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BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



VOLUME XXV 



CONTAINING LIFE SKETCHES OF LEADING CITIZENS OF 



NORFOLK COUNTY 



MASSACHUSETTS 



"Biography is tlie home aspect of history" 



BOSTON 

Biographical Review Publishing Company 

1898 



ATLANTIC STATES SERIES OF BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEWS. 



The volumes issued in this series up to date are the following: 



I. Otseijo County, New York. 

II. Madison County, New York. 

III. Broo.me County, New York. 

IV. CoLU.MBiA County, New York. 
V. Cayuoa County, New York. 

VI. Delaware County, New York. 

VII. Livingston and Wyoming Counties, 
New York. 

VIII. Clinton and Essex Counties, New York. 

IX. Hampden County, Massachusetts. 

X. Franklin County, Massachusetts. 

XI. Hampshire County, Massachusetts. 

XII. Litchfield County, Connecticut. 

XIII. York County, Maine. 

XIV. Cumberland County, Maine. 

XV. Oxford and Franklin Counties, 
Maine. 



XVI. Cumberland County, New Jersey. 
XVII. Rockingham County, New Hampshire. 
XVIII. Plymouth County, -Massachusetts. 
XIX. Camden and Burlington Counties, 
New Jersey. 
XX. Sagadahoc, Lincoln, Knox, and 
Waldo Counties, Maine. 
XXI. Strafford and Belknap Counties, 

New Hampshire. 
XXII. Sullivan and Merrimack Counties, 
New Hampshire. 

XXIII. Hillsboro and Cheshire Counties, 

New Hampshire. 

XXIV. Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 

XXV. Norfolk County, Massachusetts. 



Note. — .'Vll the biographical sketches published in this volume were submitted to their respective subjects or to the sub- 
scribers, from wliom the facts were primarily obtained, for their approval or correction before going to press ; and a reasonable 
time was allowed in each case for the return of the typewritten copies. Most of them were returned to us within the time allotted, 
or before the work was printed, after being corrected or revised ; and these may therefore be regarded as reasonably accurate. 

A few, however, were not returned to us ; and, as we have no means of knowing whether they contain errors or not, we 
cannot vouch for their accuracy. In justice to our readers, and to render this work more valuable for reference purposes, we have 
indicated all uncorrected sketches by a small asterisk (*), placed immediately after the name of the subject. They will be found 
printed on the last pages of the book. 



FeI!RUARV, 189S. 



B. R. PUB. CO. 

15 Court Square, Boston. 



F 
IZ 



PREFACE. 




UR proposition to devote a volume of tlie I^iogkai'MIcai, Rkvikw to the County 
of Norfolk, Massachusetts, having met witli favor, being cordially seconded by 
a goodly array of Norfolk worthies, we have pushed forward the work to its 
completion, with what success will appear on examination of these printed pages. 

The last quarter of the century now drawing to its close has been notably, from 
the Centennial Exhibition of 1S76 to the recent celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the Bultinch State House, an "age of retrospection," a period of com- 
memoration of the founders and the preservers of nation and Commonwealth. This 
fact, together with the concurrent rise of the historic-patriotic orders and the growing 
interest in the study of family history and genealogy, marks a taste and need of the 
times which the writer of up-to-date biographies cannot afford to ignore. Moreover, 
in view of the transmission of personal qualities from one generation to another in 
unending succession, the setting forth of long lines of ancestry, besides "extending the 
perspective of individual lives and by its revelation of kinship widening the realm 
of sympathy," has come to be recognized as having a scientific bearing of no little 
interest and value. We have, therefore, in the present number of the Review, as in 
previous issues, devoted considerable space to copious extracts from family registers 
and records, the importance of whose preservation can hardly be overestimated. 

BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW PUBLISHING CO. 
February, 189S. 



1397882 




/ 



GEORGE L. GILL. 



BIOGRAPHIGAL. 




'KORGK LKWIS GILL, for 
more than half a century one 
of the most esteemed and 
trusted citizens of Quincy, 
Norfolk County, Mass., 
noted for his strict integ- 
rity, benevolence of spirit, 
and unobtrusive deeds of 
human helpfulness, v/as a 
native of Hingham, Plym- 
outh County, this State. Born December 20, 
1823, son of Caleb Gill and the descendant of 
early settlers of that place, he died on Decem- 
ber 16, 1895, when he had nearly completed 
his seventy-second year. 

Thomas Gill, the emigrant ancestor of the 
Gill family of Hingham, was born in the 
county of Devonshire, England, probably in 
the town of Barnstable, about 1616. He 
must have been young when he crossed the 
ocean, as the early records sliovv that Thomas 
Gill received a grant of five acres of land in 
Hingham in 1635. ^'o'' several years he 
served as one of the Selectmen chosen "to 
order the prudential affairs of the new town." 
He met his death by drowning, February 
24, 1704-5, while sailing toward Boston. 
His wife, Hannah Otis, was a daughter of 
John Otis, who was born in Barnstable, 
Devonshire, England, in 1581, and was the 
founder of the family to which the noted pa- 
triot and orator, James Otis, belonged. John 
Otis died in Weymouth, May 31, 1657, leav- 
ing to his daughter, Hannah Otis Gill, "two 
feather bolsters, one rugg, a cotton blanket, 
and his biggest brass kettle"; and to his 
grandson, Thomas Gill, Jr., one of the eleven 
children of Thomas and Hannah, a musket. 

Thomas Gill, Jr., was born in Hingham, 
March 8, 1648-9, and died in that town, Sep- 
tember 3, 1725. He was Selectman for sev- 



eral years. His wife, Susanna Wilson, was 
born in Hingham, where on December 31, 
1673, they were married; and she died there 
December 2g, 1725. They had six chikhcn. 
Nathaniel, their first-born, the ne.xt in line of 
I descent, spent his entire life in Hingham, the 
j date of his birth being Dcceml^er 31, 1674, 
and that of his death, April 4, 1734. He- 
served in various ofificial capacities. On Au- 
gust 15, 1705, he marrietl Abigail, daughter 
of John and Mary (Russell) Jacobs. She was 
born in Hingham, November 13, 1683, and 
died April 30, 1749, having borne her hus- 
band five children. 

Nathaniel Gill, second son of Natlianicl 
and Abigail, born November i, 17 10, died 
February 12, 1762. He married December 
23, 1 73 1, Hannah, daughter of Caleb and 
Ruth (Hersey) Beal, and reared nine children, 
Nathaniel, third, being the fifth in this line. 
He was bm-n January 3, 1742-3, and li\-ed in 
Hingham until his demise, /Xugust 22, 1 8 1 S, 
a few weeks after the death of his wife, which 
occurred July 13, 1818. Her niaitlcn name 
was Sarah Beal. She was born A])ril 14, 
1743, a daughter of John and Deliverance 
(Porter) Beal, and was married November 26, 
1767. They had three sons and three daugh- 
ters, Caleb, their second son, being the 
grandfather of George Lewis Gill. 

Caleb Gill was born in Hingham, August 
14, 1774, and married October 21, 179S, Caty 
Beal, who was born in Hingham, October 17, 
1779, and died there May 12, 1859. Her par- 
ents were Elijah and Caty (Lewis) Beal, both 
of English origin, her father having been a 
great-great-grandson of John Beal, who came 
from the parish of Hingham, England, to 
Hingham, Mass., in 1638, and died there in 
1688, aged one hundred years: while her 
mother, Caty Lewis, was a descendant in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fourth generation of George Lewis, who emi- 
grated from East Greenwich, county of Kent, 
England, to I^lymouth, about 1633. Caleb 
Gill was a silversmith by trade, and was quite 
influential in public affairs, serving as Se- 
lectman and in other offices. He died July i, 
1855, leaving three sons, the eldest being 
Caleb, Jr., the father of George Lewis. 

Caleb Gill, Jr., was born in Hingham, Au- 
gust 23, 1799, and on December 8, 1822, mar- 
ried Charlotte Howard, who was born in West 
Cambridge, Mass., January i, 1S02, daughter 
of I^eter and Betsey (Davis) Howard. He 
held many positions of trust in his native 
town during the earlier years of his life, living 
in Hingham until 1838, when he removed to 
Ouincy, where he made his home eight years. 
In 1846 he settled in Boston; but he subse- 
quently returned to Hingham, and lived there 
until his death, July 22, 1869. His wife and 
two sons — George Lewis and Edwin Howard 
— -survived him. Mrs. Gill, whose last years 
were spent with her elder son, died in Ouincy, 
February 10, 1888. Edwin Howard Gill, the 
younger son, who was born in Hingham, July 
26, 1825, resides in Boston. He married on 
October i, 1848, Miss Sarah J. Roulston. 
They have one son, Arthur E. , of West New- 
ton. 

George Lewis Gill completed his education 
at the Derby Academy, where he was a class- 
mate of Horace B. .Spear, with whom he was 
afterward closely associated both in business 
and social life. In 1838 he cam.e with his 
parents to Ouincy, and, entering into business 
with his father, assisted him in the book- 
bindery and also in the book and stationery 
store, and the circulating library, which the 
father had established. When the father re- 
moved to Boston, the bindery, being no longer 
profitable, was abandoned; but the store was 
continued by Mr. Gill, who added quite a 
stock of merchandise, continuing the business 
until 1868. He then entered the National 
Granite Bank and the Ouincy Savings Bank as 
an assistant to Mr. Horace B. Spear, who was 
then conducting both institutions in the build- 
ing at the corner of Saville and Hancock 
Streets. In 1871 the banks were separated, 
and Mr. Gill was elected treasurer of the 
Quincy Savings Bank, a position which he 



filled most creditably to himself and to the 
satisfaction of all concerned, until his death, 
a period of nearly twenty-five years. During 
his connection with the bank it was ever in a 
prosperous condition; and its deposits were 
increased from half a million dollars to up- 
ward of two millions, a notable record. 

Mr. Gill was elected Town Clerk, March 4, 
1850, and with the exception of four years, 
from 1856 until i860, served in the same po- 
sition until the inauguration of the city gov- 
ernment in i88g, when he was urgently re- 
quested by the new Mayor to continue as City 
Clerk, but felt obliged to decline. Although 
he was a stanch Republican in his political 
affiliations, the confidence of all parties in his 
integrity and ability was such that he received 
the majority of votes of each organization in 
the annual elections for clerk of the town. 
He was a member of the School Committee in 
1855; but, finding that he had not time to at- 
tend to the duties of that office as he would 
like to do, he refused a re-election the follow- 
ing year. He was one of the managers of the 
Woodward Fund from 1869 to 1894 and of 
the public burial-places from 1874 till 1895. 
He took great interest in Mount Wollaston 
Cemetery, contributing much time and thought 
to the improvement of that beautiful resting- 
place of the dead: but his body was not in- 
terred there, he having made arrangements 
earlier in life to be buried beside his ances- 
tors in Hingham. 

Mr. Gill was a Representative to the .State 
legislature in 1856 and again in 1867. He 
was appointed Postmaster of Quincy by Presi- 
dent Lincoln in 1861, and served until re- 
moved by the succeeding President, Andrew 
Johnson, in 1866. Appointed Justice of the 
Peace in 1859 by Governor Banks, and in 
1885 made Notary Public by Governor Robin- 
son, he held both offices until his demise. 
He was likewise at the time of his death a di- 
rector of the Ouincy Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company. He was made a Mason in Rural 
Lodge, F. & A. M., in 1850, and was for a 
number of years treasurer of Mount Wollaston 
Lodge, I. O. O. F., which he joined many 
years ago, and was one of its trustees until his 
decease. 

On October 11, 1846, Mr, Gill married 



hi()(;rai'hk:al rkviI'AV 



II 



Lucretia Ann liurrcU, who was born in 
Ouincy, Mass., December ii, 1S19, a daugh- 
ter of Jo.sei)h and Lucretia (Marsli) Burreil. 
Her mother was a daughter of Wilson and 
Susanna (Savil) Marsh, and a direct descend- 
ant of Alexander Marsh, who emigrated from 
England to this country, settled in Ouincy in 
1650, and died here March 7, 1697 or 1698. 
He became an extensive land-owner, his 
large farm including what is now Hall Cem- 
etery and much of the adjoining land. 
Alexander Marsh married Mary Belcher, 
daughter of Gregory Belcher, who on Septem- 
ber 17, 1639, was one of six persons to sign 
the covenant for a church at Mount Wollaston, 
the first church of Ouincy, an organization 
with which the family of Mrs. Gill has been 
ever since connected. Mr. Gill was a con- 
stant attendant of this church and an active 
worker in the Sunday-school. The house 
now occupied by Mrs. Gill was erected by Mr. 
Gill soon after their marriage; and here were 
born their three children, two of whom died 
"while life and love were new." Walter 
George, their third child, born December 25, 
1852, died February 28, 1879. 



[^ATHANIEL SMITH, a civil engineer, 
living on Maple Place in Dedham, is 

Us V probably the oldest man in his pro- 

fession in Norfolk County, and one 
of the best known in the Commonwealth. He 
was born in Dedham, February 27, 1S27, 
being the third native of the town in continu- 
ous descent to bear this name. His paternal 
grandfather, the first of the three Nathaniels, 
although not the earliest Nathaniel Smith in 
]3edham, succeeded to the occupation in which 
he was reared, becoming one of the well-to-do 
farmers of the town. 

Nathaniel Smith, second son of the above 
named, was one of a large family of children, 
and with his brothers and sisters grew to ma- 
ture years on the old homestead. He acquired 
a good education, and in the earlier part of his 
mature life he taught school several years. 
He subsequently settled on the old family 
homestead near the village of Dedham, where 
he was engaged in tilling the soil until his 
death at the age of seventy-three years. He 



married, May 6, 182 1, Betsey Foord, a daugh- 
ter of James Foord, and one of a family of 
fourteen children. Mr. Foord was born in 
Milton, Mass., but sjjent a large part of his 
life in Dedham, where about 1800 he was 
appointed Registrar of Deeds for Norfolk 
County, being the second to hold that office. 
He held the position until his death, and was 
then succeeded by his son, luios Foord, an 
uncle of Mr. Smith, the subject of this sketch. 
Enos Foord was, in turn, succeeded at his 
death by his son, James Foord, a cousin of 
Mr. Smith; and, on the resignation of James 
Foord in 1870, John H. Burdakin, Mr. 
Smith's son-in-law, was ai)pointed to the 
office, which he still retains. Three children 
were born to Nathaniel and Betsey (Foord) 
-Smith, and two of them are still living, 
namely: Nathaniel, third; and Emily S. — 
both residents of Dedham. The father and 
mother were of the liberal type of Christians, 
affiliating with the Unitarian church. 

Nathaniel Smith, third, was reared on the 
home farm, obtaining a practical education in 
the common schools of his native town. He 
began his life work as an assistant to other 
civil engineers, being occupied in this manner 
for some years; and, when he found himself 
familiar with the profession, in 1849 he started 
in business for himself. From that time until 
the present he has been actively engaged, a 
period covering nearly a half-century, and has 
done much of the surveying in the neighboring 
towns, becoming probably better acquainted 
with the face of Norfolk County and of this 
part of the State than any other person. He 
was engaged with the late Henry F. Walling 
in State and county surveys; and he has also 
done much other work, such as the surveying 
of farms and laying out highways in this 
region. From surveys that he made in 1850, 
he published the first map of Dedham, issuing 
a large number of copies; and he has since 
assisted in the making of a large number of 
county and town maps. 

Mr. Smith was married in August, 1S49, 
to Miss Mary E. Phillips, who was born in 
Dedham, a daughter of Nathan Phillips, a 
well-known carpenter and builder. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith have four children ; namely, Ella 
Louise, Mary L., Carrie M., Frederick P. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Ella Louise, now the wife of John H. Burda- 
kin, of whom a sketch appears elsewhere in 
this volume, has two children — Leslie and 
Lillian. Mary L., wife of Francis L. Wil- 
lard, who is engaged in the pipe and plumber 
supply business in Boston, has also two chil- 
dren — Grace and Muriel. Carrie M., for- 
merly cashier in the Register of Deeds ofifice, 
married Edward S. Adams, and lives in Fall 
River, Mass., where he is well known. Fred- 
erick Phillips, who lives with his parents, is 
in the lumber business in Boston. 

Mr. Smith is a public-spirited man, devoted 
to the best interests of his town, and has done 
his part toward assisting in its advancement 
and prosperity by serving with fidelity as Se- 
lectman, Overseer of the Poor, Assessor, Road 
Commissioner, and Superintendent of the 
Streets for many years. In politics he is an 
active and stanch Republican. He is a valu- 
able member of the Unitarian church, in which 
he has been a Deacon for twenty-nine years 
and a trustee for a number of years, besides 
serving for a long time as a teacher in the 
Sunday-school. 



IDWARD RUTLEDGE EAGER, who 
has been a prominent resident of Can- 
ton for many years, is a descendant 
of one of the old New England families, as 
noted by Savage in his "Early New England 
Names." His first ancestor in this country 
was William Eager, who came to Plymouth, 
Mass., in the thirties of the seventeenth cen- 
tury. In 1654 William married Ruth Hill, of 
Maiden, Mass.; and in 1684 he removed with 
his family to Marlboro, Middlese.x County, 
Mass., where he bcame one of the proprietors 
of the Ockoocangansett plantation, purchased 
from King Philip, and which was afterward 
the homestead of the family. Zerubbabel, son 
of William and Ruth (Hill) Eager, born June 
8, 1672, married on March 23, 1698, Hannah 
Kerley. Their son Uriah, born April 4, 
1700, married Sarah Bingham, March 14, 
1727. Their son Uriah, born February 5, 
1740, married March 29, 1764, Tryphosa 
Bush. Their son Moses, born October 30, 
1772, married Sarah Stratton, December 29, 
1793, Their son Moses Edward, born No- 



vember 16, 1797, married March 25, 1827, 
Harriet Durant, and by her became the father 
of the subject of this sketch. 

Edward Rutledge Eager was born Novem- 
ber 9, 1830, in Cambridgeport, Mass., where 
the earlier years of his life were spent. In 
1850 he. came to Canton, accepting a subordi- 
nate position with the Kinsley Iron and Ma- 
chine Company. Having won the confidence 
of his employers by his trustworthiness, in 
the short space of five years he was made 
treasurer of the company, and afterward 
served the firm as manager and treasurer for 
forty consecutive years, resigning in the fall 
of 1895. He has since removed to ]5oston, 
where he is a director of the Everett Na- 
tional Bank and of the Hollingsworth & 
Whitney Paper Company, and a trustee of the 
Whitney estate. While in Canton Mr. P^ager 
took an active part in local affairs, serving as 
Selectman for a number of years, and for two 
years representing the town in the State legis- 
lature. He is a prominent member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, having taken the thirty-sec- 
ond degree, and being the oldest Past Master 
of the Blue Hill Lodge of Canton, of which 
he was the second Master. He is a member 
of the Congregational Church of Canton, in 
which he was formerly a zealous worker and 
for many years the superintendent of its Sun- 
day-school. 

Mr. Eager has been twice married. His 
first wife, in maidenhood Miss Sophia L. 
Jenkins, to whom he was united in 1856, died 
in 1857, leaving one child, Charles H. Eager, 
now of Canton, born December 28, 1856. By 
his second marriage, which was contracted Oc- 
tober 16, 1862, with Miss Mary H. Talbot, of 
East Machias, Me., there are two children, 
namely: Jones Talbot Eager, born November 
16, 1863, who is the cashier of the Everett 
National Bank of Boston; and Caroline D. , 
now the wife of William M. Chase, of Brook- 
line, Mass. Charles H. Eager applied him- 
self to his studies in the public schools of 
Brookline until sixteen years old, when he en- 
tered the crockery store of Abram French & 
Co., of Boston, with whom he remained until 
1876. He then entered the office of the 
Kinsley Iron and Machine Company, of 
which his father was the manager and treas- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



13 



urer at that time, and has since remained in 
their employment. He is a Republican in 
politics, and for some years has been Town 
Auditor. He was made a Mason in Blue Hill 
Lodge of Canton, in which he is Worshipful 
Master. He is now a member of Mount Zion 
Chapter, R. A. M., of which he is Excellent 
King; the Master of Ceremonies of Hyde 
Park Council of Royal and Select Masters for 
some time; a member of Cyprus Commandery, 
K. T. ; of Aleppo Temple, Mystic Shrine, of 
Boston; and of the Society of Sons of the 
American Revolution. 



-J^ ENJAMIN BOYDEN, for many years 
^""N one of the leading grocers of Ded- 

\r^ i ham, his place of business being lo- 
cated at Boyden Square, was born in 
W'est Dedham, February 2, 1807, son of Ben- 
jamin and Roxa Boyden, and died June 20, 
1888, at the home now occupied by his widow 
and son. 

The immigrant progenitor of the New Eng- 
land family of Boydens was Thomas Boyden, 
who came over from England in the "Francis " 
in 1634, lived for a while in Scituate, Mass., 
and finally settled in Medfield, Norfolk 
County. 

Benjamin Boyden, the subject of this sketch, 
was probably seventh in lineal descent from 
the first American ancestor. He was brought 
up on a farm until sixteen years of age, obtain- 
ing his education at the winter terms of the 
district school. He then entered the store of 
Dr. VVheaton, with whom he remained five 
years, serving a long apprenticeship, and 
having no holidajs with the exception of the 
annual Fourth of July and Thanksgiving Day. 
The first four years he received fifty cents a 
week, and during the last year of his service 
this sum was doubled. On attaining his ma- 
jority he started in business for himself, being 
obliged to borrow the capital, and beginning 
in a small way. A man of thrift and enter- 
prise, industrious and methodical, possessing 
great business ability, he met with success, 
and found his trade constantly increasing. In 
1836, being in need of more commodious quar- 
ters, he erected the building which he after- 
ward occupied, allowing five large Using 



rooms, and three commodious rooms for busi- 
ness purposes, subsequently adding to these 
as occasion demanded. Commencing with a 
small assortment of groceries, he gradually 
enlarged his stock, occasionally putting in an 
entirely new line, and long before his death 
carried the fullest and most complete stock of 
staple and fancy groceries of any merchant in 
the town. He took advantage of every new 
means and opportunity to improve his business, 
and was the first to introduce the delivery 
wagon system in this section. He was identi- 
fied with the grocery trade for sixty-four con- 
secutive years, fifty-nine years of the time 
being in business for himself, and at his 
demise was the oldest grocer in Dedham and 
without doubt the oldest in Norfolk County. 

Mr. Boyden was a typical representative of 
the self-made men of the country, the record of 
his useful life furnishing a forcible illustration 
of the success that may be attained by honest 
industry, push, and steadfastness of purpose. 
He was identified with the Whigs in his 
earlier years, but was later a sound Republi- 
can, taking an active interest in local affairs, 
although he never held any public office. 

Mr. Boyden was twice married. His first 
wife, Elizabeth Boyden, died leaving no chil- 
dren. On January 10, 1871, Mr. Boyden mar- 
ried Mrs. Lucy B. Strong Bailey. She was 
born in Orford, N. H., a daughter of Ebenezer 
N. Strong. Mr. Strong was one of the most 
prosperous farmers of that town, where he was 
a lifelong resident. His wife, Myra Bailey, 
was born in Newbury, Vt. She was a grand- 
daughter of General Jacob Bailey, of Revolu- 
tionary fame. Mr. Strong died at the age of 
eighty-six years; and Mrs. Strong, when 
seventy-three years old. Of their six chil- 
dren Mrs. Boyden is the only survivor. She 
lived with her parents until her first marriage 
in 1853, uniting her with Jerome B. Bailey. 
Mr. Bailey was born in Canada in 1810. He 
moved with his parents to F'airlee, Vt. , and 
was there engaged as a merchant during his 
years of active life, his death occurring in 
1 868. By this marriage there was one son, 
George W. Bailey. In 1871 Mrs. Bailey be- 
came Mrs. Boyden, as before mentioned. She 
is an active member of the Congregational 
church, to which Mr. Boyden also belonged. 



14 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and toward the support of which he generously 
contributed. He was well known throughout 
the whole town, and the little village of Boy- 
den Square was named in his honor. 




jLARKNCE BURGIN, a prominent and 
able young business man of Ouincy, 
Mass., and the treasurer of the 
Ouincy Savings Bank, was born 
October 27, 1865, in Rutland, Vt. He is 
the son of Mr. Thomas Burgin and Mrs. Jane 
Scudder Burgin, both of London, England. 
In 1870 the family moved from Rutland to 
Springfield, Mass. 

Clarence Burgin received an excellent edu- 
cation in the public schools of Springfield, 
Mass., and at his graduation at the high school 
of that city in the class of 1882 had the dis- 
tinction of being the youngest member 
awarded a diploma. He had fitted himself for 
a business life by taking a special course in 
engineering; and soon after his graduation he 
began work in the office of Charles Sidney, an 
architect and engineer. In October, 1883, he 
obtained a situation with John Lyman Faxon, 
a noted architect of Boston; but three months 
later, January i, 1884, he was offered the posi- 
tion of draughtsman and book-keeper for Fred- 
erick & Field, of Ouincy, and at once availed 
himself of the larger opportunity given him 
to make use of his talents. He remained with 
that firm until March i, 1889, when, in com- 
pany with R. D. Gordon, he established him- 
self in the jewelry business in Boston, becom- 
ing junior member of the firm thus formed. 
On September i, 1894, he gave up that busi- 
ness to accept the office of City Treasurer of 
Ouincy under Mayor Hodges, a position which 
he resigned the first of February, 1S96, to 
become treasurer of the Ouincy Savings Bank, 
to which he had been elected the previous 
month and which he has since ably and faith- 
fully filled. 

Mr. Burgin has also been elected to numer- 
ous other offices requiring good financial 
knowledge and administrative ability, and is 
now serving as a director of the National 
Granite Bank, of the Quincy Quarry Company, 
as director and treasurer of the Lyons Granite 
Company, as one of the directorate of the Brain- 



tree Street Railway Company, as a director of 
the Quincy Shoe Com[jany, and also as one of 
the managers of the Woodward Fund and Prop- 
erty. Fraternally, he is a member of Rural 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; of St. Stephen's Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; and of the South Shore Command- 
ery of Knight Templars. He is an Indepen- 
dent in politics, but not an office-seeker. He 
attends and supports the Episco]xil church. 



fs^OSEPH S. BIGELOW, of Cohas.set, 
president of the Atlas National l^ank of 
Boston, was born in Boston, October 
28,1848. He is a son of the late Ho- 
ratio and Annie (Smith) Bigclow. His great- 
grandfather, Abraham Biglow, Esq. (Har- 
vard College, 1782), was for many years clerk 
at Cambridge of the Supreme Judicial Court 
and Common Pleas for Middlesex County, and 
also held the office of Justice of the Peace. 
He served a number of years as Warden of 
Christ Church, Cambridge. His son, Hora- 
tio, Sr. , grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, was the first editor of the Boston Daily 
Advertiser, which dates from March, 1813. 

Horatio Bigelow, the younger, was born in 
Boston, Mass. He was a pioneer stockholder 
in the copper mines of Lake Superior, and 
held interests there for a great many years. 
PI is wife, who was a native of the State of 
Maine, was a daughter of the Hon. Albert 
Smith, Congressman in Van Buren's adminis- 
tration. Mrs. Bigelow died August 27, 1897, 
having survived her husband a number of years. 
Joseph S. Bigelow acquired his earlj- educa- 
tion in the Boston public schools, proceeding 
from the Phillips Grammar School to the 
Latin School. He was graduated at Harvard 
in 1869, and then spent about a year and a 
half travelling in Europe. On his return he 
entered his father's office in Boston, and for a 
number of years he was identified with impor- 
tant trusts of different kinds. On February 
12, 1896, he was made a director of the Atlas 
National Bank, and on January 12, 1897, he 
was elected president. Mr. Bigelow is a 
shrewd and conservative business man, and has 
the confidence and esteem of all who know 
him. 

He was married April 27, 1877, to Mary 




JOSEPH S. DIGELOW. 



1 

I 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'7 



C. , daughter of Dr. Henry Bryant of Boston 
(deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Bigclow have si.\ 
children. 

In politics Mr. Bigelow is indejiendent, 
favoring the Republican side. lie has served 
for a number of years on the School Committee 
of Cohasset, is now in his third year as Select- 
man, Assessor, and Overseer of the Poor, and 
is a member of the Board of Health. He is 
a communicant of the Episcopal Church of 
Cohasset. Mr. Bigelow is a man of the world, 
with a broad knowledge of men and things. 
He has made several trips abroad, and also has 
travelled extensively in this country. A jxirt 
of the year 1870 he spent in California. 




LONZO GOULD DURGIN, a phar- 
macist of Quincy, was born August 24, 
1854, in Natick, Mass., son of 
Hiram P. and Laura B. (Gould) 
Durgin. The father, who was born August 
28, 181 8, in New Durham, N.H., obtained 
his elementary education in the pioneer schools 
of the district, and learned the shoemaker's 
trade when but a youth. Coming then to 
Massachusetts, he worked as a journeyman in 
Natick for a few years. Subsequently, in 
company with his brother-in-law, Lyman How- 
ard, he established the first e.xpress line be- 
tween Natick and J5oston, and had carried it 
on prosperously for several years when they 
sold out to the present owners, Howe & Co. 
He next formed a partnership with a Mr. 
Hayes, becoming senior member of the firm of 
Durgin & Hayes, shoe manufacturers and 
dealers, and prior to the war did an extensive 
and lucrative business in that line. After 
giving that up he was engaged in various 
enterprises of a mercantile nature, continuing 
until his death, which occurred March 25, 
1894. A steadfast Republican in politics, he 
took much interest in local affairs, but was 
never an aspirant for official honors. He was 
a member and P. G. of the lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows in Natick. His wife, Laura, a daughter 
of Nathaniel Gould, of Natick, who was a 
native of Mont Vernon, Me., had seven chil- 
dren, six of whom grew to maturity. These 
were: Viola A., the wife of Ellery C. Cool- 
idge, of New Ha\-en, Conn. ; Ada E., who 



married William H. Jone.s, of Natick; Alonzo 
Gould, the subject of this sketch; Hiram 
Herbert, of Pittsfield, Mass. ; Charles Eugene, 
who died in 1873; and I-'rederick R., of 
Brattlebcno, Vt. The mother was for many 
years a member of the (Jrthodox Church of 
Natick. 

Alonzo G. Durgin completed his education 
in the Natick High School. At the age of 
thirteen years he began learning the drug- 
gist's business in the store of Frank E. Cum- 
mings, with whom he remained eight years. 
On F'ebruary 7, 1876, he started in business 
on his own account, locating in Quincy, on 
what is now Chestnut Street, opposite the 
Congregational church. When the Robertson 
House was finished, he became its first tenant, 
moving his stock and fixtures there October 26, 
1876. He remained in that locality until the 
completion of the Durgin & Merrill Block, 
when he removed to his present commodious 
and convenient quarters, taking possession 
April 2, 1887. He has a very large patron- 
age, being the leading druggist of the city, 
and the oldest established. Also he has large 
real estate interests, owning considerable land, 
most of it being in Quincy; and he is the 
treasurer and manager of the Quincy Real 
Estate Trust. In politics he is independent, 
voting irrespective of party prejudice. He is 
a Mason of Rural Lodge, St. Stephen's Chap- 
ter, and South Shore Commandery; and he 
belongs to the Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company, which he accompanied to 
London in 1896. 

On May 16, 1883, Mr. Durgin married 
Alice Dell, a daughter of Caldwell De Wint 
Churchill, of Fishkill, N. Y. Caldwell De 
Wint Churchill was born in December, 1836, 
in Matteawan, N.Y., and was early fitted for 
college, it having been his intention to enter 
one of the learned professions. His plans, 
however, were changed, owing to his early 
marriage; and he has since been engaged in 
book-keeping. F'or many years he was em- 
ployed thereat in the carpet works of A. T. 
Stewart. He has always taken an active part 
in i^olitics, hut has never sought office. He is 
a Mason of high rank, having taken the thirty- 
second degree, and is also a prominent member 
of the organization of Odd F'ellows. In 1856, 



i8 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ere attaining his majority, he married Mary 
II Ferguson, a daughter of Lewis B. Fergu- 
son, born in Matteavvan, N.Y., in 1840. 
They became the parents of six children, of 
whom four are now living, namely: Henry L. , 
of Brooklyn, N. V. ; Alice Dell, now Mrs. 
I^urgin ; Louise ()., the widow of Charles 
L\)uits, late of New Yori< City; and Frank T., 
of Fishkill. Mr. and Mrs. Churchill are 
members of the Dutch Reformed church. 
Mrs. Durgin's grandfather, Henry Churchill, 
was born in Matteavvan, N. Y., in 1796, where 
for many years of his life he was a prosper- 
ous agricultuiist and a wealthy land-owner. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Helen 
Mott, was born in 1799. She was a cousin of 
the celebrated Dr. Valentine Mott; and her 
father was the founder of Albany, N.Y., 
which was then called l-'ort Orange. The 
Mott family are of French descent, and many 
of its members have attained distinction since 
the settlement of its first ancestor on Ameri- 
can soil. Of Mr. Durgin's children, Ellen 
Churchill, Charles Flugcne, and Mary Gould 
are livintr. 




ILLIAM P. BARKER, a native of 
/SV Quincy, carries on an extensive 
business in Lanesville, Mass. 
Horn June 3, 1843, son of Henry Barker, he 
conies of ancestors who have been loyal and 
useful citizens of Massachusetts for many gen- 
erations. Asa Barker, Sr., his great-grand- 
father, who was born in Methuen, Mass., in 
1745, married Lydia Pierce, who was born in 
1751. .She was a sister of Governor Ben- 
jamin IMerce, the father of Franklin Pierce, 
wild was President of the United States. Asa 
Barker, Jr., also a native of Methuen, born 
August 27, 1772, was an e.xpert blacksmith 
:uid stone-cutter. His second wife, Nancy 
Jones l^arker, was the mother of Henry 
Barker. 

Henry Barker was born Sejitember 16, 181 i, 
in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Mass., and 
there received a common-school education. 
He learned the trades of blacksmith and 
stone-cutter uniler the instruction of his 
father. In early manhood he worked in Bos- 
ton as a journeyman stone-cutter, and after- 



ward pursued the same occupation in Quincy, 
whither he came about the year 1837. Later 
he beci^me a contractor, commencing in a 
small wrv. One of his first contracts of any 
importai e was for the columns in front of the 
okl cou c-house in Boston. Shortly after 
forming 1 partnership with Abel Wright, his 
brothers, Charles and George, were taken into 
the firm, the style of which then became 
Barker, Wright & Co. In 1861 Mr. Wright 
withdrew, after which the business was suc- 
cessfully conducted for several years under the 
name of H. Barker & Brothers. Subsequently 
this firm dissolved, and two new ones were 
formed, that of H. Barker & Brothers, of 
Quincy and Philadelphia, and Barker Brothers, 
of Quincy and Lanesville, Mass., H. Barker 
being at the head of both. Charles Barker as- 
sumed the management of the Philadelphia 
yard, while George Barker had charge of the 
quarry and business at Lanesville, which they 
had purchased in 185 i. For some years the 
work consisted mainly in the quarrying and 
sale of rough granite. Later, having begun 
to build, the)- furnished and set the granite 
for the new Masonic Temple in Philadelphia, 
a large contract; took one equally as large for 
the Ridgeway Library Building; and were 
awarded the contracts for several large busi- 
ness buildings in Philadelphia, including the 
Pennsylvania Railway offices and the Pennsyl- 
vania Bank. In 1867 Henry Barker, together 
with his sons — Henry F., George A., and 
William P. — formed the firm of Henry Barker 
& Sons. The eldest son died March 2, 1878; 
Henry Barker, the head of the firm, passed 
away July 1 1, i88g; and on October 16, 1889, 
George A. Barker died. When the estate was 
settled, William P. Barker, the sole survivor 
of the original firm, took the business in his 
own name, and has since carried it on with 
eminent success. The quarry in Lanesville 
yields a very fine granite; and, when business 
is good, from fifty to sixty men are there em- 
ployed in cutting pavement blocks. 

Henry Barker was a Mason of Rural Lodge. 
In politics he was a stanch Republican, and 
for several terms represented Quincy in the 
State legislature. He was also a member of 
the School Committee for a number of years, 
and one of the trustees of the Thomas Crane 



tiC. 




WILLIAM CARTER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2t 



Public Library from the time of its organiza- 
tion until the formation of the city govern- 
ment. While broad in his religious opinions, 
he and his entire family attended and sup- 
ported the Adams Temple Unitarian Church. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of Amos 
Smith, of VVaterford, Me., and became the 
father of the three sons already named. 

After completing his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Quincy, William P. Barker be- 
came a clerk in the Mount Wollaston Bank. 
Two years later he accepted a position in the 
National Exchange Bank of Boston, where he 
was employed from 1863 till 1867. Then, as 
above stated, he became a member of the firm 
of Henry Barker & Sons. Mr. Barker takes 
great interest in yachting, and is a member of 
the Ouincy Yacht Club. In imlitics he is a 
consistent Republican. 




BR AH AM H. TOWER, president of 
the Cohasset Savings Bank, was born 
in this town, April i, 1829, son of 
Abraham tL and Charlotte (Bates) 
Tower. The founder of the family in Amer- 
ica was John Tower, an Englishman, who be- 
came a resident of Hingham, Mass., in 1637, 
what is now Cohasset then being included in 
that settlement. Abraham Tower, grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, was an active 
member of the famous Boston Tea Party, De- 
cember 16, 1773, and lived to take part in 
the War of 1812. 

Abraham H. Tower, first, father of Abra- 
ham H., subject of this sketch, was a lifelong 
resident of Cohasset, and for many years was 
engaged in the mackerel fishing industry. He 
died in June, 1881. Charlotte Bates, his 
wife, was also a native of this town. Five of 
her children survive, namely: Abraham H., 
the subject of this sketch; Henry C. ; Char- 
lotte M. B., widow of the late Edward E. 
Tower; Newcomb B., a member of the present 
Board of Selectmen; and Daniel N., superin- 
tendent of the water-works, all of whom reside 
in Cohasset. 

Abraham H. Tower was educated in the 
public schools; and, entering the counting- 
room of the Revere Copper Company, Boston, 
he remained with that "concern for twelve 



years. In 1858 he established himself in gen- 
eral mercantile business at Cohasset Harbor; 
and in 1866 he aihnittcd his brother, New- 
comb B., to partnership, and added to his 
stock in trade coal, lumber, and all kinds of 
building materials. He has since continued 
at the head of the firm, which is now known 
as Tower J^rotiiers & Co., and carries on a 
large business. Mr. Tower has been a direc- 
tor of the Hingham National Bank for the 
past twenty-five years, was formerly vice- 
president and is now president of the Cohasset 
Savings Bank. He is also a director of the 
Cohasset Fire Insurance Company and local 
agent for the Hingliani I'irc Insurance 
Company. 

In politics he is a Republican, and has 
served as Town Treasurer and Collector for 
the past thirty years. He is always ready to 
aitl in the promotion of imiirovements ; and, as 
an enterprising business man and public- 
spirited citizen, he fully merits the high esti- 
mation accorded him by his fellow-townsmen. 
In his religious views he is a Unitarian, and 
for several years has performed the duties of 
clerk of that church. He is connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd ^'ellows. 

Mr. Tower married for his first wife Mary 
L. Browne, who bore him two children, 
namely: Mary H., wife of the Rev. E. O. S. 
Osgood, of Brattleboro, Vt. ; and Abraham 
H., Jr., of Stoughton, Mass. Mr. Tower's 
present wife was before marriage Frances 
Hi neks. .She is a native of York, England. 




ILLIAM CARTER, a prominent 
resident of Needham, Mass., head 
of the manufacturing firm of Will- 
iam Carter & Co., was born in Alfreton, 
Derbyshire, England, in 1830, and was edu- 
cated in the schools of his native town. 
Crossing the Atlantic in 1857, he landed in 
New York City; and coming immediately to 
Norfolk County, Massachusetts, he entered the 
employ of Samuel Sutton, of Brookiine, who 
was engaged in knitting infants' clothing. 
He remained with him three years, and then 
came to Needham to work for John and Mark 
Lee in the same line of industry. After stay- 
ing with them si.\ years, he started in business 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



for himself, forming a partnership with the 
Lee brothers, under the firm name of Lee, 
Carter & Co. Ten years later, when the firm 
failed, Mr. Carter took the business in his own 
hand.s. He is now carrying it on under the 
name of William Carter & Co., manufacturing 
knit underwear for ladies and children, 
hosiery and fancy knit goods of all kinds, and 
selling his product to jobbers of Boston, New 
York, Philadelphia, and other large cities. 
About one hundred employees are actively en- 
gasfed most of the time, and the annual value 
of the output is one hundred thousand dollars. 
Besides the knit goods he manufactures a pat- 
ent self-computing scale, of which he owns a 
half interest. Mr. Carter's fine factory, thor- 
oughly equipped with modern machinery for 
successfully carrying on the business, is val- 
ued at forty thousand dollars; and it is the 
fruit of his own, labor and economy. 

Since taking up his residence in Needham, 
Mr. Carter has been much interested in local 
public affairs. He was Selectman of the town 
for four years, and served upon the School 
Committee for twelve years. In 1895 he 
served as Representative to the General Court 
of Massachusetts, and was on the Committee 
upon Drainage. Mr. Carter has done a great 
deal to promote the growth of Highlandville, 
planting shade trees, laying out and improving 
new streets. In politics he is a Republican. 

He is a member of the Norfolk Lodge, F. 
& A. M.; of the Newton Chapter, R. A. M. ; 
of the Nehoiden Lodge, Sons of Temperance; 
and of the Home Market Club of Boston. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Highlandville, was on the Build- 
ing Committee, and has been one of the trus- 
tees since the church was built. He is very 
much interested in all church work, and has 
been superintendent of the Sunday-school for 
a number of years. Mr. Carter joined the 
Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of 
Boston in 1893, and went with the company to 
England on their famous trip in the summer 
of 1896, when he revisited the place of his 
birth. 

He has been married three times. His 
first wife, Hannah Truman, to whom he was 
married in England in 1S54, died in 1862. 
She left one son, Frarik C, who is now mar- 



rietl and at work in his father's factory. He 
was educated in the public schools and at 
Comer's Commercial College. Mr. Carter's 
second wife was Martha, a daughter of Mark 
Lee, and a sister of Mr. Carter's former part- 
ner. She died leaving four children — -Will- 
iam H., Elizabeth, John J., and Horace A. — 
of whom the oldest and youngest were edu- 
cated in the common schools, high school, 
and commercial schools, one at Comer's and 
one at Bryant & Stratton's, and are now mar- 
ried and at work in their father's factory; and 
the other son, John J., is also married, and a 
carpenter by trade. The daughter was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Needham. She 
married C. W. Jones, and is living in High- 
landville. Mr. Carter and his third wife, 
Jennie G., a daughter of Jonathan Avery, of 
Needham, have two children: Lucie Avery, 
now in VVellesley College in the class of 
1900; and Roscoe Arnold, now in the Need- 
ham High School. The present Mrs. Carter, 
who was educated in Newton, is a woman of 
literary taste and accomplishments, and an 
author of some reputation. Among her books 
maybe named "Bound Brook," "Amy Rush- 
ton's Mission," and "The Old Distillery," 
which has had an extensive sale for over 
twenty-five years. 



;^AMES TIRRELL, of South Weymouth, 
for many years a successful hide and 
leather merchant of Boston, and now 
largely interested in real estate, having 
an office at 1 5 1 Pearl Street, in that city, was 
born December 6, 1829, upon the estate in 
Weymouth first settled by Gideon Tirrell, his 
direct ancestor, who came here some two cen- 
turies ago. From the Report of the Record 
Commissioners of the city of Boston, No. 9, 
we learn that William Therrell (Tirrell) and 
Rebecca Simpkins, daughter of Captain Nich- 
olas Simpkins, were married January 29, 
1655, by Governor Bellingham, and that their 
son Gideon was born in Boston, July 16, 1664. 
William Tirrell and his family later removed 
to Weymouth. 

James Tirrell, Sr., grandfathci' of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in Weymouth, 
where he resided aM his life; and his son, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



23 



James, Jr., was long a boot and slioe manu- 
facturer of this place. Aftervvartl, until a 
short time previous to his death, which oc- 
curred in 1865, the second James Tirrell en- 
gaged in the hide and leather business. He 
married Uetsey VVhitemarsh, of East Wey- 
mouth, and had several children. The sur- 
vivors are: the son James, third of the name; 
and two daughters, as follows: Mary J., 
widow of the late Colonel James L. Bates, 
who succeeded Colonel I-^letcher Webster in 
the command of the Twelfth Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry; and Tirzah, wife 
of Moses T. Durrell, of Boston. The father was 
a Whig and afterward a Democrat in politics. 
He was for many years Overseer of the Poor 
in the town. He was a member of the Union 
Congregational Church of South Weymouth. 

James Tirrell, third, after taking his ele- 
mentary course in the public schools of South 
Weymouth, attended the Pinkerton Academy 
at Derry, N. H. At the age of eighteen years, 
in company with E. S. Wright, he opened a 
country store in Independence Square at South 
Weymouth. The firm existed six years, Mr. 
Tirrell resigning to join his father in the hide 
and leather business in Boston. He spent 
three years as clerk, and then bought a finan- 
cial interest in the business. After the death 
of his father he carried on the business for 
seven years in partnership with an uncle, Al- 
bert Tirrell, under the firm name of J. and A. 
Tirrell & Co. In 1S72 Mr. Albert Tirrell re- 
tired from the firm, and Mr. Alfred Tirrell 
took his place. Some years later Mr. James 
Tirrell sold his interest in the concern, and 
became engaged in real estate transactions. 

Mr. Tirrell married Helen Sprague, daugh- 
ter of the late Jesse H. Sprague, of South 
Weymouth. Three children were born to 
them. The two now surviving are: James, of 
South Weymouth; and Helen P., wife of 
I-'leeniing Brook, of the same place. 



/T^IIARLES H. PRATT, formerly a 
I Ky well-known manufacturer of shoe- 
^Is maker's stock in East Weymouth, 
was born here, December 26, 1830, 
son of Bela L. and Nabby (Tirrell) Pratt, who 
were also natives of We^iouth. His father, 



who was a local preacher of repute in this 
neighborhood, died when the subject of this 
sketch was in his boyhood. At an early age 
young Charles began to learn the .shoemaker's 
trade, working mornings and evenings while 
attending school. At the age of fifteen he be- 
came foreman of a force of workmen engaged 
in manufacturing shoes. Afterward he had 
charge of Canterbury & Haskell's factory for a 
considerable length of time. Early in the 
eighties he engaged in the manufacture of cut 
calf stock for fine foot-wear, and carried it on 
successfully for the rest of his life. In this 
locality he was the pioneer in that particular 
branch of the leather trade, and he was the 
first to apply steam-power to shoe manufactur- 
ing in East Weymouth. Highly esteemed by 
the shoe and leather dealers of Boston and vi- 
cinity, he was frequently called by the Massa- 
chusetts Board of Arbitration to suggest 
means and otherwise assist in the settlement 
of labor troubles; and his constant desire to 
deal justly with the contending parties was 
highly appreciated by all concerned. He was 
an upright, conscientious man and a public- 
spirited citizen, who was in sympathy with all 
measures relative to town improvements. His 
death, which occurred in East Weymouth, No- 
vember 9, 1896, when he was nearly si.\ty-si.\ 
years old, was sincerely regretted by all who 
knew him. 

On October 16, 1850, Mr. Pratt was united 
in marriage with Elzira N. Rice. She was 
born in Weymouth, daughter of Captain Will- 
iam and Margaret N. (Pratt) Rice, the former 
of whom served in the War of 1812, and was 
for many years a ship-master. Mr. Pratt left 
one son, William H., who is a resident of 
East Weymouth. In Masonry Mr. Pratt had 
reached the thirty-second degree, and was 
serving as Prelate of the Commandery in East 
Weymouth at the time of his decease. For 
fifty years he was an active member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, serving it in 
various official positions, including that of 
choir leader. His services as director, trus- 
tee, and member of the Investment Commit- 
tee of the East Weymouth Savings Bank 
covered a period of several years, and were ex- 
ceedingly beneficial to the interests of that in- 
stitution. In politics he was a Republican. 



24 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




ILLIAM H. TUCKER was a prom- 
inent business man of Avon and a 
member of the Massachusetts legis- 
lature. He was born Januar)' 1 1, 1823, in 
Milton, Mass., son of Nathan and Catherine 
Tucker, both of whom were natives of Milton, 
the father having been a prosperous farmer. 
He was educated in the common schools of 
Milton, and remained at home until he was 
eighteen years old. He then went to East 
Stoughton, Mass., where he was for a time 
employed in the shoe factory of his brother 
Ebenezer, who subsequently received him into 
partnership. The firm of Tucker Brothers 
continued in business for a number of years. 
Then William H. became associated with 
another brother, Nathan Tucker; and still 
later he was engaged in the manufacture of 
boots with George and Ephraim Littlefield. 
After his retirement from the shoe business, 
he became a broker. He was also a director 
of the Home National Bank of Brockton from 
the time of its incorporation until his death, 
which occurred August 19, i8g6, in his 
seventy-fourth year. Mr. Tucker acquired 
success through his own personal efforts, and 
by his honorable methods gained the esteem 
and confidence of his fellow-townsmen. He 
served as a Selectman in Stoughton, was espe- 
cially active upon the School Board, and he 
represented his district in the legislature dur- 
ing the session of 1859. For some years he 
acted as a trustee of the Avon cemetery, and 
was particularly interested in the Grand Army 
of the Republic, whicli he aided financially 
when needed. 

Mr. Tucker married for his first wife Eliza- 
beth Davenport, of Dorchester. By this 
union there is one daughter, Ellen E., now 
the wife of George W. Porter, of Avon. For 
his second wife he wedded Achsa B. Bur- 
gess, a daughter of Covill and Lurana (Swift) 
Burgess, of Sandwich, Mass., the former of 
whom served as a soldier in the War of 1812. 
The late Mr. Tucker was an energetic and 
public-spirited citizen, did much toward de- 
veloping the town, and took a deep interest 
in all public institutions. It was frequently 
said that his word was as good as his bond. 
He was a member of the Masonic order. Mrs. 
Tucker, who still occupies the homestead, is a 



lady of much intelligence and worth, and is 
highly esteemed. 



/TAOLONEL HENRY ANDREW 
I V^ THOMAS, Postmaster of Boston, and 
^Is one of the leading public men of 

the State of Massachusetts, is a na- 
tive and resident of South Weymouth, Norfolk 
County, the home of his ancestors for several 
generations. He was born July 29, 1856, son 
of Henry and Betsy (Chaffin) Thomas, and is 
a lineal descendant of Captain John Thomas, 
a native of Wales, who commanded the vessel 
that conveyed William of Orange to England 
in 1688, and who subsequently immigrated to 
America, settling in Braintree, Mass., where 
he died "ye 4th October, 1714." 

John Thomas, second, son of Captain 
Thomas, born in Braintree in 17 10, was the 
father of John, third, the first of the family to 
settle in South Weymouth. The latter was 
the father of Andrew, better known as Captain 
Andrew Thomas, who was an extensive land- 
owner and a lifelong resident of South Wey- 
mouth. Captain Andrew Thomas was three 
times married, and reared eleven sons and one 
daughter, among whom was Henry, father of 
the subject of this sketch. 

Henry Thomas was reared and educated in 
his native town, and, when a young man, en- 
gaged in the manufacture of shoes, which busi- 
ness he successfully conducted for many years. 
He is still a resident of South Weymouth. 
He and his wife, Betsy, reared four children. 

Henry A. Thomas was educated in the 
public schools of South Weymouth, being 
graduated from the high school in the class of 
1873. A few months after his graduation he 
entered the civil service as a messenger boy in 
the Boston post office, where he remained 
until 1893, rising through the different grades 
to the position of superintendent of mails. 
In the year mentioned he retired from the 
postal service, and took an active part in the 
State political campaign of that summer and 
autumn, which resulted in the election to the 
chief magistracy of Mr. Frederic T. Green- 
halge, who forthwith appointed him as his 
private secretary. He retained this position 
until the Governor'^fteath in February, 1895; 




HKNKV A. THOMAS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



27 



and subsequent to that event and until the 
following January he served Governor VVolcott 
in a similar capacity, being appointed during 
this period a member of the Governor's staff, 
with the title of Colonel. Colonel Thomas 
received the appointment of Postmaster of 
Boston in May, 1897; and he assumed charge 
of the office on the ist of the following June. 

He married in 1880 Miss Addie C. Tir- 
rell, daughter of Cyrus Tirrell. They have 
one daughter, Mildred. 

Colonel Thomas takes an active interest in 
the affairs of his native town, and is ever 
ready to aid in promoting any practical meas- 
ure having for its object the moral or material 
advancement of the community. He is par- 
ticularly interested in educational matters, and 
served the town for some years as a member of 
the School Board. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the Weymouth Improvement Society 
and also of the Wednesday Night Club, a de- 
bating society which flourished for a number 
of years, with practical benefit to its mem- 
bers. He also helped to organize the Norfolk 
Club, of which he is now president. He be- 
longs to the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. The Colonel is a pleasant and effective 
public speaker, and, while secretary to Gov- 
ernor Greenhalge, capably represented him on 
many occasions at public gatherings. He has 
participated in the various campaigns in this 
State since he became of age, and has rendered 
valuable party service. The high social posi- 
tion he holds is due not only to his public 
record, but also to his character as a man. 

fHADDEUS H. NEWCOMB, a retired 
business man of Quincy and its pres- 
ent Representative in the State legis- 
lature, was born in this town, March 15, 1826, 
son of the late James Newcomb. He comes of 
Revolutionary stock, his grandfather, Bryant 
Newcomb, having been a patriot of the Revo- 
lution. The latter was captured by the Brit- 
ish and confined for some time in Dartmoor 
Prison, England. He was an extensive farmer 
of Ouincy, and likewise carried on a large 
granite business. 

James Newcomb, born and educated in 
Quincy, during his early manhood was en- 



gaged in freighting granite on sloops to Bos- 
ton for some years. He was afterward en- 
gaged in quarrying granite on his own ac- 
count, being one of the leaders in that 
industry, and continuing at it until his death. 
Well informed and highly respected, and hav- 
ing the town's welfare at heart, he was chosen 
to fill many of the town offices, including that 
of -Selectman, in which he served for several 
terms. He also represented the town in the 
General Court for a time. In ])olitics he was 
a Whig; ami he was a member of the First 
Unitarian Church, which he served in the ca- 
pacity of Deacon for a number of years. He 
married Lucy Baxter, a daughter of Jonathan 
Ba.xter, of Quincy. Of their ten children, 
eight grew to maturity; namely, Lucy, James, 
Bryant B. , George, Oliver T., .Susanna, Thad- 
deus H., and Peter W. The two last named 
are the only survivors now. Susanna was the 
wife of the late John W. Shaw. 

Thaddeus H. Newcomb obtained a good 
education in the public and private schools of 
Quincy. As soon as he was capable, he 
began quarrying under his father's instruction, 
acquiring a practical knowledge of that indus- 
try. On the death of his father he formed a 
partnership with his brother, the late Oliver 
T. Newcomb, and carried on a very successful 
business under the firm name of Oliver T. 
Newcomb until the outbreak of the Rebell- 
ion. Mr. Newcomb then enlisted in Com.- 
pany G, Forty-second Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry, as a private. Later he 
was promoted to the rank of F"irst Lieutenant. 
With his regiment he was sent to the Depart- 
ment of the South-west, and at the battle of 
Galveston was taken prisoner, and was subse- 
quently held by the Confederates for nineteen 
months, suffering untold privations. In Sep- 
tember, 1864, he was released; and, his term 
of enlistment having expired, he was at once 
discharged from the Union service. Return- 
ing home after this, he accepted a position as 
quarry superintendent, in which capacity he 
had the sole charge of the quarries of Messrs. 
Churchill and Hitchcock from 1875 until 1895. 

A zealous Republican in politics, Mr. New- 
comb takes an active part in local affairs. On 
the incorporation of Ouincy as a city, he was 
elected to the Common Council, in which he 



28 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



served four consecutive years, being on the 
Committee on Streets, Drainage, and Sewer- 
age. In 1895 he was elected to the State 
legislature, and served on the Committee on 
the Liquor Law. Re-elected to the legislat- 
ure in 1896, he was made chairman of the 
same committee. Fraternally, Mr. Newcomb 
is a member of Paul Revere Post, No. 88, 
G. A. R.; is connected with the Society of 
the Union Prisoners of War; and is a member 
of Delphi Lodge, No. 15, K. of P., of which 
he is Past Commander. On December 12, 
1847, he married Eliza A., daughter of Al- 
bert Hersey, of Quincy. Mr. and Mrs. New- 
comb are members of the Washington Street 
Congregational Church, of which he has been 
Deacon the past twenty years. 



§ACOB S. DYER, a venerable resident 
of Braintree, was born here, February 
5, 181 8, son of Jacob and Mary (Deals) 
Dyer. His grandfather, Peter Dyer, 
was a soldier of the Revolution, and drove a 
baggage team during that war. Peter died in 
the ninety-fifth year of his age. Jacob, a son 
of Peter, spent his life in Braintree, where he 
dealt in meats and poultry, and owned and 
carried on a farm. He married Mary Beals, 
of Randolph, Mass., and had thirteen chil- 
dren, of whom Jacob S. is the only survivor. 

Jacob S. Dyer was educated in the public 
schools of his native place, and assisted his 
father in his business until he was twenty-one 
years of age. Then he engaged in farming, 
and began dealing in meats and poukry, 
which he sold at the Ouincy Market in Boston. 
Subsequently he manufactured boots and shoes 
in South Braintree for a number of years, after 
which he again took up farming, which he has 
since followed in South Braintree. 

On October 10, 1841, Mr. Dyer married 
Ann M. T. Holbrook, a native of Randolph, 
and a daughter of Peter and Eliza (Sawing) 
Holbrook. The Holbrooks belong to an old 
family of Randolph. Mrs. Dyer's great- 
grandfather was a Major in the Revolutionary 
army. Of her ten children, Adnniram J., 
Jacob A., .Simeon D., jabez S. , Nathan T., 
George S., ancl Brainard T. are living. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dyer are members of the South 



Congregational Church. Mr. Dyer has been 
a Deacon of the society for many years. In 
politics he is a Republican, and he has been 
Road Surveyor in the district where he lives. 
In the ante-bellum days he was a strong anti- 
slavery man. One of the two sons of his 
who fought in the war of the Rebellion died 
from the effects of the hardship and exposure 
of army life. Mr. Dyer is a public-spirited 
man, and has always aided movements for the 
benefit of the town. 



Ji 



AVIS D. RANDALL, a prominent 
resident of East Weymouth, is a na- 
tive of Braintree. He was born 
February 20, 1831, son of Dean and 
Abigail B. W. (Walker) Randall, natives re- 
spectively of Easton and Marshfield, Mass. 
Dean Randall, who came of English origin, 
and was reared in Easton, was afterward until 
his death engaged in the manufacture of 
tacks, brads, and nails in Braintree and sub- 
sequently in East Weymouth, to which he re- 
moved some time in the thirties. He was one 
of the founders and a director of the Wey- 
mouth Iron Works. Four of his children sur- 
vive him, namely: Davis D., the subject of 
this sketch; Otis H., a resident of Brockton; 
Andrew J., of East Weymouth; and Mrs. 
J. A. Welch, of Hingham. He was a self- 
made man, and at the time of his death was 
considered one of the wealthiest men in the 
town. He was an old-time Whig. Public- 
spirited to a high degree, he favored any 
movement to improve the town. He was a 
prime mover in securing the South Shore Road 
extension through Weymouth, and contributed 
of his own means to this result. 

Davis D. Randall, who came to Weymouth 
with his parents when a child, grew up in the 
town. His general education was received in 
the common schools and in the academies at 
South Braintree and Bridgewater. Subse- 
quently he graduated from Comer's Commer- 
cial College at Boston. Upon the death of 
his father he began business life for himself, 
taking charge of the tack factory, and running 
that for a time in order to close out the busi- 
ness. He has been twice married, and is the 
father of three children — Davis D., Jr., 



•.v">. 



^^ ^ 




THOMAS J. XASH. 



BIOGRA PI I ICAI, R KVIf;W 



3' 



Lottie E., and Bessie S. The son is a clerk 
in an insurance business in Boston. For a 
number of years Mr. Randall, Sr. , has been a 
trustee of East Weymouth Savings Hank. In 
political principles he is a Republican. An 
esteemed Mason, he is a member of the Royal 
Arch Chapter and of South Shore Com- 
mandery. 



6 1 HOMAS J. NASH, an esteemed resi- 
' I dent of Nash's Corner, Weymouth, was 
born there, November 22, 1820, son of 
Thomas and Phoebe (Binney) Nash. The 
father, a son of Joshua Nash, served as Select- 
man and Town Treasurer of Weymouth for 
twenty years, and died February 6, 1S82. 
His uncle. Captain Thomas Nash, was a 
soldier of the Revolution. Jacob Nash, who 
was an officer in the Revolutionary army, and 
Solomon Nash, who also fought in that 
struggle, were family connections. Of the 
children of Thomas, Thomas J., Mrs. Eliza- 
beth V. White, and Clinton are living. 
Nash's Corner was so named in honor of the 
Nash family, its earliest settlers; and the 
post-office is now known as Nash. 

Thomas J. Nash resides on the old Nash 
homestead, which has been owned and occu- 
pied by his ancestors for two hundred and fifty 
years. On this estate stands the original 
"Vinson" pear-tree, more than two hundred 
years old, under the branches of which nine 
generations have gathered and eaten of its 
fruit. On October 9, 1804, the main part of 
the top of the tree was blown off during a 
hurricane. The tree still stands and bears 
fruit, and is one of the landmarks of Wey- 
mouth. Near it is a spring of clear water 
which for many years supplied the families in 
the vicinity, and to this day is used by the 
Nash descendants for drinking purposes. 
Close by, for many years, stood the wigwam 
of an Indian. Here the subject ot this sketch 
passed his boyhood, attending the district 
schools, and occupying his leisure time by 
working on the farm. He married August 21, 
1877, Alice A. Ager, the widow of Wilbur F. 
Ager, of Weymouth, Mass., and a daughter of 
Samuel and Helen (McKay) Hollis. Her 
father was a native of Randolph, Born of the 



union were nine children; namely, Joshua L., 
Thomas V., Harold 11 (deceased), Helen !■;. 
(deceased), A. Mildred, H. Reginald, Ken- 
neth L., Arthur li., and Clayton VV. Mr. 
Nash is a member of the Union Congrega- 
tional Church at South Weymouth. He and 
Joseph Dyer are the only surviving incorpora- 
tors of the South Weymouth Savings Bank, 
and he was a trustee of the institution until 
recently. In politics he is a Republican, has 
been much interested in the welfare of the 
town, and has filled many of its responsible 
public offices. Throughout his life he has 
kept well informed on the topics of the day. 



DWARD B. SOUTHER, of Quincy, a 
dealer in newspapers, periodicals, fancy 
articles and cutlery, was born in this 
town, January 29, 1827. A son of John 
Souther, he is a lineal descendant in the 
seventh generation of Joseph Souther (first), 
a cooper by occupation, who was married in 
Boston, October 22, 1657, by Governor Endi- 
cott, to Elizabeth Fairfielde. She was a 
daughter of Daniel Fairfielde, who was a 
member of Pastor John Robinson's church 
in Lcyden. Born in Boston in 1640, she died 
in that city, October 14, 1730. Joseph 
Souther (second), born in Hingham, Mass., 
August 20, 1658, married Hannah, daughter of 
Christopher and Ann Holland, and, as appears 
from his father's will, died before December 
14, 1696. Joseph Souther (third), who was 
born February 27, 1685, spent his active years 
occupied in the calling of a shipwright. On 
April 22, 1708, he married Content Tower, 
who died December 17, 1730. Joseph 
Souther (fourth), a native of Cohasset, born 
November 20, 1721, married Abigail Kent, 
October 10, 1744; and both died in 180S. 
Their son, John Souther, the grandfather of 
Edward B., born in Hingham, Mass., Febru- 
ary 15, 1755, married on December 21, 1780, 
Deborah Leavitt. 

John Souther (second), the father of Ed- 
ward B., was born September 13, 1781, in the 
part of Cohasset that was then known as 
Beechwood Swamp. When he was a lad he 
removed with his parents to Hingham, where 
he attended the district school and then the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Derby Academy. Afterward he worked at 
ship-building with his father, whom he suc- 
ceeded in business, carrying it on alone from 
the time of his father's death until 1815. 
Coming then to Norfolk- County, he bought a 
large tract of land situated about half-way be- 
tween Ouincy and Ouincy Point, and which 
was afterward known as Souther's Hill. Here 
he had carried on ship-building for some years 
when, in 1835, he retired in favor of his eldest 
son, John I.. Souther. For some years he was 
a stockholder of the Mount Wollaston Bank. 
He was a Whig in politics; and, besides serv- 
ing as Selectman for a long period, he repre- 
sented the town in the State legislature several 
terms. He was quite prominent in local 
matters, taking great interest in all beneficial 
enterprises, and was one of the building com- 
mittee of the town hall and of Adams 
Temple, the Unitarian church. On January 
20, 1805, he married Lydia Lincoln, a daugh- 
ter of Jonathan and I.ydia (Nichols) Lincoln, 
of Hingham, and by her became the father of 
ten children. These were: John, born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1806, who died October 18, i8gi ; 
William, born March 7, 1808, who died July 8, 
1867; Henry, born May 6, 18 10, who died 
May 9, 1892; George, born March 21, 1813, 
who died October 19, 1837; Frederick, born 
April II, 181 5, who resides in Quincy; Lydia 
L., born March 6, 181 7, who on August 30, 
1838, married the late T. W. Averill, and 
died March i, 1891 ; Charles Nichols, born 
May II, 1 8 19, who is a resident of Napa City, 
Cal. ; Hannah Lincoln, born July 27, 1821, 
who is the wife of Emery Souther; Catherine 
C. , born January 20, 1824, who married 
William Appleton, now of Westboro, Mass. ; 
and Edward B. , the subject of this biography. 
Both parents were active members of the Uni- 
tarian church. The father's death occurred in 
March, 1878. 

Edward B. Souther attended the public 
schools of Ouincy and a private school in 
Northboro. He afterward became a clerk in 
the grain store of his brother Henry. Later 
he bought out his brother, and carried on 
the business alone for the ensuing tv/o years. 
In 1850 he went across the Isthmus to Feather 
River, California, where he met a family party, 
consisting of his brothers, Henry and Fred- 



erick, Henry's son Henry, and his brother-in- 
law, William Appleton, who had made the 
journey by way of the Cape. They all went 
directly to the mines; but Mr. .Souther stayed 
but a year, preferring life in Massachusetts. 
On October 21, 1851, .shortly after his return 
home, he went on a gunning excursion, and 
was so unfortunate as to shoot off his right 
hand while loading his gun. In the following 
January he took charge of the grist-mill on the 
property his father had purchased when he first 
came to this town, and operated it until 1858. 
On March 29, 1869, he bought his present 
business, which was then very small, handling 
but one edition of one paper each day. He 
has since greatly enlarged his operations, re- 
ceiving four editions of the Boston Globe and 
three of the other daily papers. He has also 
a large trade in the leading magazines, and in 
fancy articles, tobacco, and cutlery, carrying 
the best line of the latter to be found outside 
of Boston. 

Mr. .Souther is a Past Grand of Mount Wol- 
laston Lodge, and treasurer of Manet Encamp- 
ment, I. O. O. F. , and a member of Shawmut 
Canton, Patriarchs Militant. On February 
26, 1846, he was first married to Sarah H., 
daughter of Josiah Adams, of Quincy. Of 
his six children, four are now living, namely: 
Sarah Adelaide, the wife of Tilson A. Mead, 
who is the principal of the Chapman School, 
I'2ast Boston, Mass. ; Edward W. and Henrj' 
Lincoln, both of Boston; and Elizabeth 
Adams, the wife of Dr. Frederick Illsley, of 
Chelsea, Mass. The mother, who was an 
active member of the Unitarian church, to 
which Mr. Souther also belongs, died October 
29, 1868. Since then he married Mary E. , 
daughter of Perez Chubbuck, of Ouincy. Of 
the two children of this marriage, Mary Adams 
is living. 



OHN HENRY DINEGAN, a real es- 
tate dealer and note broker, is a well- 
known business man of Ouincy and 
one of its most active citizens, and 
was born in Ouincy, September 3, 1856, son 
of the late Daniel and Mary Ann (Ward) 
Dinegan. The father, who was a native of 
County Longford, Ireland, went to England 




J. VARNUM ABBOTT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



.^5 



when a small boy, and resided there until a 
short time after his marriage. Coming then 
to the United States, he settled in Quincy, 
where he followed the trade of a boot-maker, 
which he had learned in the old country, 
until the breaking out of the Rebellion. He 
then enlisted for service in the war with a 
company of nine months' men. At the end ot 
that time he re-enlisted in Company G, Forty- 
second Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer In- 
fantry, in which he served until taken prisoner 
by the Confederates. After spending several 
months in the rebel prison at Galveston, he 
was released; and, his term of enlistment hav- 
ing expired, he was honorably discharged from 
the Union army. Returning to Uuincy then, 
he was engaged in the work of a tanner and 
currier until he received a stroke of apople.xy, 
from which he never fully recovered. Two 
years later he suffered a third stroke, causing 
his death in iSSi. His wife, Mary Ann, a 
daughter of John Ward, of Staffordshire, Eng- 
land, had nine chiklren born, of whom si.x are 
now living. Her daughter Alice married 
Maurice Keohan, of Weymouth, Mass. ; Mar- 
garet is the wife of Andrew McPherson, of 
Quincy; and Emily married John O. McDon- 
nell. The others are: Mary Ellen, Daniel 
Wanl, and John Henry. 

John Henry Dinegan received his education 
in Quincy, being graduated from the Quincy 
High School with the class of 1872. At once 
he began life for himself, entering a grocery 
store as a clerk, a capacit)- in which he con- 
tinued five years. Then he purchased his em- 
ployer's interest in the store, and afterward 
profitably conducted it until 1891. In that 
year he made a change in his occupation, be- 
coming an operator in realty and notes. His 
executive and financial ability is acknowl- 
edged, and he often fills offices requiring expe- 
rience and shrewdness. He is also one of the 
directors of the Quincy Co-operative Bank. 

On October 5, 1882, Mr. Dinegan married 
Hannah M., daughter of William and Hannah 
Webb, of Quincy. They have had six chil- 
dren, of whom Mary Webb, Alice, and Emily 
are living. Mr. Dinegan is a member and 
the sexton of St. John's Catholic Church. In 
politics he takes an independent course, vot- 
ing for the best men and measures regardless 



of parly. l'"or a time he was the chairman of 
the Board of Health, and he has served lor 
three years on the Board of Assessors. He is 
the Treasurer of the Royal Society of Good 
Fellows; has membership in Monticello 
Lodge, No. 13, A. O. U. W., of Charles- 
town, Mass.; and is Chief Ranger of the Mas- 
sachusetts Catholic Order of P'oresters. 



VARNUM ABBOTT, president of the 
J. V. Abbott Manufacturing Company 
of I'2ast Dedham, Mass., manufacturers 
of loom pickers, strappings, and other 
leather goods, was born June 7, 1836, in An- 
dover, Mass., a son of Moody B. Abbott. 

The Abbot, or Abbott, family is one of the 
oldest in Andover. The founder of the 
branch to which the subject of this sketch be- 
longs was "George Abbot, of Rowley," so 
called to distinguish him from others of the 
name who came from England to Massachu- 
setts more than two hundred and fifty years 
ago, and died at his home in Rowley in 1647. 
His son, George,- who came with him, settled 
in Andover in 1655, and there married, in 
1658, Sarah Farnum. The line is thus con- 
tinued: Nehemiah,' born in 1667, who was 
Deacon of the .South Church in Andover 
thirty years; his son, Nehemiah,-* who settled 
in Lexington, and was Town Treasurer; Will- 
iam,' a farmer who lived in Andover; and 
Jeduthan,'" of Andover, who was the father of 
Jeduthan,' grandfather of i\Ir. Abbott, of Ded- 
ham. (An interesting account of descendants 
of George Abbot, of Rowley, is contained in 
the Essex Antiquariaji for July, 1897 (edited 
by Sidney Perley, and published in Salem), to 
which we are indebted for some of the facts 
here given.) 

Jeduthan Abbott, second of the name, was 
a prosperous farmer in Andover. He was 
exceedingly fond of horses, always keeping 
fine stock, and was prominent in military cir- 
cles, in the War of 181 2 serving as Captain 
of a company of .State militia. He married 
Betsy Bridges, of Andover, also the descend- 
ant of an old Colonial family; and they 
reared two children, Moody B. being the 
younger. Both he and his wife lived to be 
seventy-four years old. 



36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Moody B. Abbott was born and reared on 
the homestead in Andover, and in that beauti- 
ful hill town spent his sixty-nine years of 
life, engaged the larger part of the time in 
agricultural pursuits. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Hannah V. Noyes, was also 
born in Andover, a daughter of Frederick 
Noyes, a well-to-do farmer, who reared a fam- 
ily of ten children. She was a bright and 
active woman of eighty-five years, when she 
died April 9, 1897. Of her seven children 
four survive, namely: Charles M,, of Califor- 
nia; J. Varnum; Sarah M. ; and M. Elizabeth, 
wife of Richard A. Ward. Both parents united 
with the West Congregational Church in their 
younger days. The father was a man of some 
prominence, and took an active part in local 
affairs, serving in many of the town offices. 

J. Varnum Abbott completed his education 
at Phillips Academy in Andover, pursuing his 
studies there three years. He began his busi- 
ness life as clerk in a country store, where he 
had an experience in selling various kinds of 
merchandise, including grain, groceries, light 
and heavy hardware, and dry goods. After 
three years in that position he went to Boston, 
and was employed eighteen months as clerk in 
a large wholesale and retail dry-goods house. 
In 1857 he began learning the trade of a ma- 
chinist at North Andover, entering the ma- 
chine shops of Davis & Furber, manufacturers 
of woollen machinery, staying there until after 
the breaking out of the late Civil War. 

In May, 1861, Mr. Abbott was made First 
Sergeant of a company of Volunteer Infantry 
that was formed in North Andover to aid in 
putting down the Rebellion; but, before the 
company could be mustered into the United 
States service, word came from the office of 
the Adjutant-general that no more troops were 
then needed by the government. The com- 
pany was accordingly disbanded, and Mr. Ab- 
bott resumed his former occupation. In 1862 
Mr. Abbott again offered his services to his 
country, enlisting in Company A, Thirty-third 
Massachusetts Regiment, as a private. A 
short time after his enlistment he was seri- 
ously injured, and, not being able to do active 
duty, was placed in the office of the military 
governor. General Slough, of Ohio, at Alex- 
andria, Va., as a clerk, a position which he 



filled until receiving his honorable discharge 
in December, 1862. 

Returning at once to North Andover, he re- 
sumed his former work in the machine shop, 
continuing there until 1864. From that time 
until 1874 he was employed in the shops of 
the Grover &• Baker Sewing Machine Com- 
pany. Coming then to Dedham to establish 
himself in business on his own account, he 
began the manufacture of his present line of 
goods on a modest scale, being the pioneer of 
this industry. His trade rapidly increased; 
and he was making fine progress when, in 
1883, his buildings and tools were completely 
destroyed by fire. At this time he had a large 
force of men at work, Charles E. Luce, his 
son-in-law, being a partner. The plant was 
rebuilt and newly equipped, and in 1885 the 
company was formed and incorporated under 
its present name. The business has steadily 
increased, new orders constantly coming in 
from all parts of the country, so that even in 
the recent time of financial depression new 
hands had to be hired to complete the work, 
and the buildings have had to be enlarged 
from twenty-two feet by thirty feet, to twenty 
two feet by seventy-five feet. One secret of the 
great success of this enterprising firm is that 
none but the best material and tools are used. 

Previous to Mr. Abbott's engaging in the 
manufacture of loom pickers, the work was 
done wholly by hand. Machines invented by 
Mr. Abbott and his son-in-law, Mr. Luce, 
when introduced completely revolutionized 
the business, their labor-saving qualities 
enabling the company to produce better goods 
at less cost than the hand-made. All the 
goods placed on the market by this company 
are now made by machinery of Mr. Abbott's 
and Mr. Luce's invention. Some of these 
machines have been patented, and rights to use 
them have been sold to other manufacturers at 
remunerative prices. 

Mr. Abbott has been thrice married. In 
1857 he married Mary F. Frye, a daughter of 
Stephen Frye, of Andover. She died at the 
age of twenty years of consumption, a disease 
which carried off many of her family. Mr. 
Abbott's second wife was Mary J. Sutcliffe. 
She was the mother of one child, a daughter, 
Jennie E. The maiden name of the present 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVFKW 



37 



Mrs. Abbott was Lucy J. Rogers. She was 
born in Danvers, Mass., a daughter of L. C. 
Rogers. The two children born of the third 
marriage are: Helen F. and Florence R. 
Jennie E., the eldest daughter, is the wife of 
Charles E. Luce, D. M.D. , who was engaged 
in business with Mr. Abbott until 1890. In 
that year he was graduated from the Harvard 
Dental College, and then went to Frankfort- 
on-the-Main, Germany, and later to .Stuttgart, 
where he is successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession, being the only Ameri- 
can dentist in the place. Mr. and Mrs. Luce 
have two children — Elmer V. and Marguerite. 
Helen F. Abbott, Mr. Abbott's second daugh- 
ter, is an accomplished musician, having stud- 
ied two years in Germany, completing her ed- 
ucation at the Boston Conservatory of Music. 
She is now supervisor of music in the schools 
of Bristol, R.I. Her sister, Florence R. Ab- 
bott, a graduate of the Bridgewater Normal 
School and of the Cambridge Kindergarten, 
is a teacher in the Endicott School. 

Mr. Abbott is an unswerving Republican in 
politics, and has been a member of the Re- 
publican Town Committee. He has been re- 
peatedly urged to accept public office, but has 
persistently declined. He is prominent in 
the order of Odd Fellows, being a charter 
member of Samuel Dexter Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
and a member of Monterey Encampment, No. 
60, Hyde Park; he is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum and R. S. G. F., in which he 
has filled all the chairs; he i.s also a mem- 
ber of the Home Circle, of which he has 
been Grand Vice-Leader two years and Grand 
Leader the same length of time; and is now 
an instructor in the Supreme Council. He is 
an active member of the Charles W. Carroll 
Post, No. 144, G. A. R., of which he has 
been Commander; and he belongs to the 
Fisher Ames Club of Dedham. He is a regu- 
lar attendant of the Episcopal church, of 
which his wife and children are members. 



TgTENRY A. BELCHER, of Randolph, 
j-^-l the present Representative of the 
Jjs I Seventh Norfolk District in the 
General Court, was born in Ran- 
dolph on August 6, 1844. A son of Henry 



and Harriet Belcher, both natives of this 
town, he comes of ICnglish origin, and traces 
his ancestry back to a Belcher who settled in 
Braintree, Mass., in 1639. ^^ grew to man- 
hood in his native town, attending the public 
schools and later the Stetson High -School. 
When thirteen years old he entered the cm- 
ploy of Francis Townseml, who kept a general 
merchandise store in Randolph, and remained 
with him for several years. In his twentieth 
year he went to Boston, where he became a 
salesman in the great dry-goods establishnTcnt 
of Jordan, Marsh & Co. In 1873 he became a 
buyer, and the manager of their dress-goods 
department. Three years later he entered the 
firm of R. H. White & Co, a connection that 
lasted until January i, i8g6, when he with- 
drew. In that period of twenty years he 
shared and, in a large degree, was instrumen- 
tal in securing the business success which the 
firm of R. H. White & Co. is known to have 
achieved. Mr. Belcher is a financier of un- 
usual ability, and his judgment and. advice 
have been earnestly sought by numerous so- 
cieties and corporations having large financial 
interests. He is now a director of the Boyls- 
ton National Bank of Boston, and is a trustee 
in the Turner Library at Randolph. He is a 
member and Past Master of Norfolk Union 
Lodge, F. & A. M.; and he is Deputy Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of the State of 
Massachusetts. 

Mr. Belcher married Hannah 15. Nye. a 
daughter of Stephen and Mary A. Nye, of 
Sandwich, Mass. He is a Republican in ])ol- 
itics, and he was elected to his present office 
as Representative on the Republican ticket. 
He is identified with the LJnitarian church, 
and is a liberal supporter of its various enter- 
prises. Mr. Belcher is the owner of one of 
the most beautiful and attractive homes to be 
found in Norfolk Comity. The spacious and 
elegant mansion is surrounded by lawns and 
shrubbery in harmony with its architecture. 
Mr. Belcher's career as a business man needs 
no eulogy. To his marked natural abilities 
as a business manager, his good judgment 
and sound sense, he united push, honesty, and 
a determination to succeed; and as a result he 
rose from the position of clerk to that of 
partner in one of the foremost mercantile con- 



38 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



cerns in the United States, the possessor of a 
handsome fortune. His life stands forth as a 
brilliant example for younger men, and will 
undoubtedly be an inspiration for many years 
to the youth of his native town. 



r3RGE F. HUSSEY, the well-known 
superintendent of the Jenkins Manu- 
facturing Company's works at East 
Braintree, is a native of Albion, Me. Born 
in June, 1846, he is a son of Benjamin and 
Elizabeth E. Hussey, both also natives of the 
State of Maine. He remained at home until 
si.xteen years of age, attending the public 
schools. When President Lincoln issued the 
first call for nine-months troops, Mr, Hussey, 
then a mere lad, responded by enlisting in 
Company G of the Twenty-sixth Maine Regi- 
ment. He served for nearly a year, doing duty 
around Fort Hudson, La., sharing in General 
Banks's Red River campaign, and fighting in 
the siege of Fort Hudson, at Irish Bend, and 
in other minor engagements. He subsequently 
enlisted in Company H of the Second Maine 
Cavalry, which was attached to the Ninteenth 
Army Corps, and took part in sundry cavalry 
raids, principally made in Louisiana and 
Florida. Having spent more than two years 
in the cavalry service, he was discharged. 
Then he returned to Maine, and for a short 
time attended the academy at Freedom. 
Afterward he learned the trade of machinist, 
and worked for several years as journeyman. 
In 1880 he came to East Braintree for the pur- 
pose of building some special machinery for 
the plant of which he is now the superintend- 
ent. He had worked here as machinist for 
about a year when he was made foreman, or as- 
sistant superintendent. This position he held 
until May i, 1889, when he was appointed to 
the post of superintendent left vacant by the 
death of S. F. Jenkins, the former superin- 
tendent. The Jenkins Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of which he is the official representa- 
tive, manufactures boot and shoe laces, wetting 
cords, and braids. The plant is located on 
the Monatiquot River at East Braintree, and 
is run by water-power and by steam. It em- 
ploys on an average forty operatives, and is 
carrying on a highly successful business, 



Mr. Hussey is a self-made man, and enjoys 
universal confidence and esteem. In politics 
he is a Republican, and he favors every move- 
ment for the public good. He is a member of 
General Sylvanus Thayer Post, No. 87, 
G. A. R., at South Braintree; and of Ncpon- 
set Lodge, No. 84, I. O. O. F., at Neponset. 
Mr. Hussey's wife was formerly Mary M. 
Dike, of Sebago, Me. 




ENRY F. BICKNELL, one of the 
prominent merchants of East Wey- 
mouth, was born in this town, 
March 26, 1824, son of James and 
Nancy (Wilder) Bicknell. His father was a 
native of Weymouth; and his mother was born 
in Hingham, Mass. The Bicknell family is 
one of the best known in this locality. (A 
more extended account of its ancestry will be 
found in the biography of Zachariah L. Bick- 
nell.) James Bicknell, who was a shoemaker, 
and followed that trade in Weymouth and 
Hingham, died in 185 i. He was an industri- 
ous man and an esteemed member of the com- 
munity. Of the several children reared by 
him, Henry F. is the only survivor. 

Henry F. Bicknell was reared and educated 
in East Weymouth. At the age of ten years 
he began to learn the shoemaker's trade, and 
he followed it afterward as a journeyman for 
about twenty -seven years. Then he engaged 
in manufacturing, in company with Q. L. 
Bicknell and E. G. Gardner, under the firm 
name of Bicknell, Gardner & Co. A year 
later he became the sole proprietor of the 
business, and thereafter carried it on alone 
until 1885, when he relinquished it to enter 
the grocery business, which he has since fol- 
lowed. His prosperity began at the start; 
and his ability and regularity have gained the 
confidence of his business associates and the 
public generally, who give him a liberal share 
of their patronage. In politics he is a Re- 
publican, and is in favor of all movements 
relative to increasing the prosperity of the 
town. He was one of the incorporators of the 
East Weymouth Savings Bank, which he 
serves in the capacities of trustee and a mem- 
ber of its Investment Committee. He is a 
Master Mason, a member of South Shore 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



39 



Commandery, Knights Teni])lar, antl an Odd 
I'Y'llow. 

Mr. liickncdl married Iktscy C. Our, of 
Hingliam, and lias liad tliree children. Of 
these the only one living is Clara K., the 
wife of Peter W. French, of this town. IVIr. 
and Mrs. Bicknell attend the Congregational 
church. 




RANK WALLACE BRETT, M.D., a 
representative physician of South 
Braintree, was born in Hingham, 
Mass., May 14, 1S61, eldest son of Mersena 
and Ann S. (Loring) Brett. His father, a na- 
tive of Duxbury, a mason by trade, is now re- 
tired from active business, and resides in Bos- 
ton. The Doctor's mother was a descendant 
of Thomas Loring, one of the earliest settlers 
of Hingham, where he drew a house lot in 
September, 1635. 

Frank W. Brett was educated in the public 
schools of Hingham, graduating from the high 
school ; and from his thirteenth to his eigh- 
teenth year he worked more or less at his 
father's trade. Entering the Bridgewater 
State Normal School at the age of eighteen to 
prepare for teaching, he was graduated in 
1880, and first taught school in Norwell, 
Mass. Two years later he became preceptor 
of the Hanover Academy at Hanover, Mass., 
where he remained six years, resigning to 
become the principal of a grammar school in 
Needham, Mass. In 1891 he came to Brain- 
tree as principal of the Monatiquot School, 
and he remained in that capacity here for 
four years. He had developed a strong taste 
for chemistry and kindred branches of sci- 
ence, and he frequently lectured upon these 
subjects. During his years of teaching in 
Braintree he attended lectures at the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons in Boston; 
and in 1894, immediately after receiving his 
degree, he was appointed professor of bacte- 
riology there. In the fall of 1895 Dr. Brett 
began the active practice of his profession in 
South Braintree. He now commands the pa- 
tronage of a steadily increasing number of the 
residents of the town, and enjoys the confi- 
dence and esteem of the public at large. 

Dr. Brett married August 2, 18S5, Annie J. 



Cuming, of Hingham. They have two sons 
— Afley L. and Roy C. The Doctor is a 
valued member of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society and of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. He is also well known in the best 
fraternities of the vicinity, being identified 
with Rural Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at 
Ouincy, with the I. O. O. F. at South 
Braintree, and the United Order of the 
Golden Cross at Hanover, Mass., being one of 
the charter members of Fraternal Command- 
ery, No. 260. He holds a prominent position 
in the town, and is serving at the present time 
on the School Board of Braintree. 




RKDERICK BARNICOAT, a skilful 
granite sculptor of Ouincy, was born 
in Penryn, Cornwall, England, April 
7, 1857, son of Thomas P. and Emma (Cur- 
dew) Barnicoat. The father, also a native of 
Penryn, was there for many years a contracting 
mason, having a large business and employ- 
ing many men. His wife, Emma, likewise a 
native of Penryn, bore him nine children. 
These are: Elizabeth, the wife of James 
Coles, of Leeds, Yorkshire, England; Emma, 
the wife of James Hogg, also of Leeds; Mary 
Hannah, the wife of Henry Worsdell, of 
Ouincy, Mass. ; Charlotte, a school teacher in 
Birmingham, England; John, of Providence, 
R.I.; lidwin, of Mylor, Cornwall, England; 
Frederick, the subject of this sketch; S. 
Henry, of Ouincy, Mass.; and Charles, of 
Providence, R.I. 

Frederick Barnicoat was educated, and 
learned the trade of a granite cutter in 
Penryn, England, living there until twenty- 
four years old. Emigrating then to America, 
he settled in Westerly, R.L Here he fol- 
lowed his trade for five years, and subse- 
quently in Boston for six months. After com- 
ing to Ouincy in 1886, he had been employed 
as a carver and statue cutter for two years, 
when he started in business for himself, 
being the only person in the city making a 
specialty of statue cutting. Since then, by re- 
markably artistic work, he has achieved a 
wide reputation, and now receives orders from 
all parts of the Union. He has done much 
work for soldiers' monuments. In the last 



4° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



year he cut and shipped thirty -three figures, 
employing as assistants about twenty-two men. 
He tai<e.s great interest in anything connected 
with the development of the granite industry, 
and is one of the directors of the T. W. 
Smith & Co. Granite Turning Company. 

Mr. Barnicoat is a member of the Sons of 
St. George. He married Mary M. Lawry, 
who was born in Penryn, England, daughter of 
Ale.xantler Lawry. They have seven children 
living; namely, Charles, Gertrude, Stanley, 
Nelson, Minnie, lunnia, and Frederick, Jr. 




LISHA HAVVES, a retired contractor 
and builder of North Stoughton, was 
born in this town, April ig, 1814, 
son of John and Eunice (Worthington) Hawes. 
His father was born in Stoughton in 1785, 
and his mcjthcr in Canton, Mass., in 1790. 
His paternal grandparents, Elisha and Sarah 
(Wentworth) Hawes, of Canton, had a family 
of six children; namely, Samuel, Elijah, 
l{nos, John, Ruth, and Rebecca. Grand- 
father Hawes followed agricultural pursuits 
until his death, which occurred in 1796, and 
was caused by an accident. 

John Hawes, son of the elder Elisha, was 
engaged in farming and teaming during his ac- 
tive period, and was an able and industrious 
man. He died December 10, 1877, at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-two years; and his wife, 
who lived to the age of ninety years, died 
December 14, 1880. Both were members of 
the Baptist church. They reared seven chil- 
dren, as follows: Alpheus, William, Elisha, 
Mather !■;., Abigail, Elijah, and Emery. 
Alpheus Hawes, who is no longer living, mar- 
ried for his first wife Lucy J. Stephenson, of 
Ohio, and for his second, Jane Tucker, of 
Canton, Mass. William, who was a shoe man- 
ufacturer, married Charlotte Hawes, of .Stough- 
ton, the two being now deceased. Mather E., 
who married Laura Bond, of Vermont, was 
originally a shoe manufacturer, was afterward a 
schoolmaster, still later a Universalist min- 
ister, and for a time was engaged in the real 
estate business in I'ioston. For several years 
he was connected with the Boston post-office, 
and he is now residing in that city. Abigail 
is the widow of Charles Upham, late of Can- 



ton, and is now residing in Los Angeles, Cal. 
Elijah, who married Jane Wadsworth, of Ver- 
mont, was formerly a shoe manufacturer, 
and went to California. Emery, who was in 
early life engaged in shoe manufacturing, is 
now a merchant and Postmaster at North 
Stoughton. His first wife was Lucy A. 
Wentworth, of Canton ; and his present wife 
was formerly Mrs. Emeline Packard Snell, of 
Brockton. 

Elisha Hawes was educated in the common 
schools of Stoughton; and at the age of eigh- 
teen he went lo Roxbury, where he learned the 
carpenter's trade. Four years later he re- 
turned to his native town, and, starting upon 
his own account as a contractor and builder, 
was actively engaged in that business for sixty 
years, during which time he erected many 
dwelling-houses and other buildings in this 
village. He retired in 1896, but is still a 
strong and active man, possessing the agility 
of a much younger person. 

Mr. Hawes has been three times married. 
His first wife, with whom he was united on 
January 24, 1837, was Hannah A. Tucker, of 
Roxbury, who died December 25, 1853. His 
second wife, Mrs. Eunice P. Glover, widow of 
Elijah Glover, of Stoughton, died March 26, 
1891 ; and on November 12 of the same year 
he married Mrs. Susan H. Bailey, a daughter 
of Daniel and Susan (Fowler) Herring. Her 
father was born in Dedham ; and her mother 
was born in Dorchester, Mass. Daniel Her- 
ring resided in Dedham, and followed the 
trade of mason in connection with farming. 
His wife died in 1851, and he died in 1S53. 
Mrs. Hawes's first husband, Calvin C. Bailey, 
a native of Vermont, who was engaged in the 
express business, died February 15, 1876. 

By his first marriage Mr. Hawes became 
the father of seven children; namely, Lucy 
Ann, Marsena B., Ellen Mary, Alvah T., 
Hannah A., Allah, and Elisha S. Lucy Ann 
Hawes married John T. Farrington, of Mil- 
ton, and is now residing in Iowa, where her 
husband is a prosperous farmer. She has six 
children — John M., Lucy E^lla, Lizzie Lee, 
Marsena, Elisha, and Charles H. Marsena B. 
Hawes died July 7, 1864, while serving in 
the Civil War. Ellen Mary is the wife of 
Charles W. Cook, formerly of Milton, and 



.'^ 




ELISHA HAWES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



43 



now a farmer in Berkley, Mass. Her chil- 
dren are: Arthur B., Charles, Beulah, Lizzie 
A., and Samuel H. Alvah T. is a carpenter 
in Boston. He married Alice Davenport, and 
she died leaving two children — Silas G. and 
Jennie. Hannah A. married J. Henry Far- 
rington, a farmer of Milton, and her children 
are: Emily, Fred M., Mary A., Frank H., 
Lucy A., Ellen R., Dora, and Evelyn. Allah 
Hawes died November i, 1852. Elisha S., 
who is following the carpenter's trade in 
North Stoughton, married Hattie Lothrop, of 
Avon, Mass., and has four children — George 
M., Mildred, Bertha, and an infant deceased. 
By his second union Mr. Hawes had one child, 
Alia, who married H. Addison, of Nova 
Scotia, and died November 20, 1884. 

Politically, Mr. Hawes is a Republican, 
but has never sought for or held office. He is 
connected with Rising Star Lodge, F". & 
A. M., and the Sons of Temperance. He is 
a member of the Universalist church, and 
served upon the Parish Committee for several 
years. 



6Thoi 



HOMAS LADNER WILLIAMS, a 
^1 jeweller, optician, and engraver, of 
Quincy, was born at Penzance, County 
Cornwall, England, December 8, 1850, son of 
William James Williams. The great-grand- 
father, James Williams, Sr. , was a lifelong 
resident of England and for many years a 
blacksmith at one of the mines in Devonshire. 
The following incident related of him shows 
the high regard in which he was held by his 
workmen. During the progress of some war, 
probably that of the American Revolution, 
when there was a great demand for men, he 
was forcibly seized by the press gang, and 
taken to Plymouth. The miners became so 
incensed at this outrage that they marched in 
a body to that town, and, arriving at the phy- 
sician's office just as James Williams was 
undergoing an examination, walked in unan- 
nounced, their leader saying, "There is a 
little man here we want." Without further 
formalities, they picked up the said James 
Williams, and, placing him upon their shoul- 
ders, carried him home, a distance of fifteen 
miles. 



William James Williams, a son of James 
Williams, Jr., who was also a well-known 
blacksmith of Devonshire, was born in Tavi- 
stock, Devonshire, England, April i, 1825, 
and was there educated. He learned the 
stone-cutter's trade, which he followed 
throughout a large part of his life. In 1872 
he came to America, and, after working as a 
stone-cutter in Maine for two years, returned 
to his native land. Subsequently, in the ca- 
pacity of contractor under the English govern- 
ment, he was engaged in building bridges and 
a railroad in Central Africa for about two and 
one-half years. He married Mary Hosking, 
who had four children. These are: Sarah 
Ann, the widow of William Berryman, late of 
Penzance, England; Elizabeth, the wife of 
Professor James Hicks, a teacher of swim- 
ming in Penzance; William James, a resident 
of Wales; and Thomas L., the subject of this 
sketch. The father died in 1884. Both par- 
ents were attendants of the Protestant Meth- 
odist church. 

Thomas L. Williams left school when 
eleven years old. Three years later he began 
working at the stone-cutter's trade, which he 
followed for about twelve years. On reaching 
man's estate he emigrated to the United 
States, and settled first at Dix Island, Me., 
where he assisted in cutting the granite for 
the New York post-office. In 1873 he went 
to Hurricane Island in Kno.x County, Maine, 
and there worked on the granite destined for 
use in the erection of the St. Louis post- 
office. During the four years he spent here, 
his evenings and the rest of his leisure time 
were employed in watch repairing. That he 
had a propensity for this occupation from his 
early years is easily recalled to him by his 
vivid recollection of a thrashing he received in 
that period for fooling with an American clock 
that his father had just brought home. In 
1877 he removed to Tenant's Harbor, in the 
same county, and established himself as a 
jeweller and country merchant, later deal- 
ing in gentlemen's furnishing goods. With 
characteristic enterprise, in order to advertise 
the business, he started a small sheet called 
Toivn Talk, the only paper in the town, and 
soon had a list of five hundred subscribers in 
the place, the population of which was three 



44 



JilOGkAl'HlCAL REVIEW 



thousand souls. In 1887 Mr. Williams dis- 
posed of this store, and came to West Quincy. 
Here he embarked in the jewelry business, 
and also started a paper known as the West 
Quincy Enterprise, which he had conducted 
for about six months, when he sold out. His 
present jewelry store, which he opened in 
i8g6 in the city proper, is one of the largest 
establishments of the kind in Norfolk County. 
I'ersistent study during the last few years, 
supplemented by practical lessons obtained in 
lioston, has made him a skilful optician. 

While in politics he is a sound Republican, 
he is popular with both parties. In West 
Ouincy, which usually goes Democratic by 
three to one, he came within twenty votes of 
election to the Council, without any effort on 
his part. He is a member of the Sons of St. 
George. The first of his three marriages was 
contracted with Annie Cook, of St. George, 
Me., who died leaving one child, Annie. His 
second marriage was made with Mary J. Rich- 
ards, a native of England, who became a resi- 
dent of Hurricane Island. Of his children by 
her, Lauretta E. is living. His present wife, 
born in Burlington, Vt., whose maiden name 
was I'2va B. Sullivan, has borne him one 
child, Thomas Lindall. 



LISHA THAYER, a prominent business 
man of 15raintree, was born November 
5, 1825, in East Randolph (now 
Holbrook). A son of Elisha and Annie 
(Reed) Thayer, he is descended from John 
Thayer, a pioneer settler of l^raintree. His 
father, who was an agriculturist by occupa- 
tion, in early life kept the toll-gate at East 
Hraintree for a time. Of his parents" other 
chiUlren, two survive, namely: Charles, who 
lives in South Braintree; and I{!liza A. Capen, 
of Stoughton, Mass. 

Mr. Thayer spent his early youth in Hol- 
brook, Mass. At the age of si.xteen years he 
was apprenticed to L. G. Horton, of Ouincy, 
to learn the baker's trade. Subsequently, for 
a time, he followed this calling in Milton and 
South Weymouth, and then engaged in the ex- 
press and grocery business at South Braintree, 
under the firm name of Cook & Thayer. Sub- 
sequently the partial loss of health induced 



him to remove to Wentworth, N.H., where he 
was engaged in farming and the lumber busi- 
ness for two years. At the end of that time, 
his health being improved, he resumed the 
grocery business at the old stand. His next 
venture was in the manufacture of carpet 
slippers; anil for several years, in partnership 
with Edward Potter, he carried on the Boston 
Carpet Slipper Company, afterward establish- 
ing the same business alone in Boston. He 
was for three years the president of the Hing- 
ham Steamboat Company. When the inter- 
ests of this company were sold to another con- 
cern, Mr. Thayer engaged more or less in 
real estate. During the administration of 
President Buchanan he was Postmaster of 
South Braintree, and for the past fourteen 
years he has served as Justice of the Peace. 
He married Celia A. M. Bates, of Hanover, 
Mass., whose children by him are: Mrs. S. A. 
Willis, of Worcester, Mass; and Mrs. Charles 
H. Sprague, of Braintree. Mr. and Mrs. 
S. A. Willis have four children — Mabel, 
Nettie, Lila, and Samuel T. Mr. and Mrs. 
Sprague have one daughter, PZthel B. 

Mr. Thayer is identified with the Knights 
of Honor at South Braintree, Mass. He has 
spent two winters in Florida. Several years 
ago, with one of the well-known Raymond 
parties, he spent four weeks in Mexico, going 
as far South as the tropics, and making a two 
weeks' stay in the city of Mexico, where he 
was an interested spectator of a genuine bull 
fight. On the same excursion he visited San 
Francisco and other parts of California, be- 
sides spending some time at Salt Lake City. 



r^ATHAN TUCKER, one of the promi- 
nent business men of Avon, was born 




in Milton, Mass., April 2, 1820, 
son of Nathan and Kate (Tucker) 
Tucker. The Tuckers, who come of English 
origin, are one of the old families of Milton. 
Amariah Tucker, Mr. Tucker's grandfather, 
resided here for a number of years. Nathan 
Tucker, Sr., who was a farmer, and his wife 
were born in Milton. 

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood 
on his father's farm, receiving his education 
in the public schools and at the Milton Acad- 




KLISHA THAYER 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



47 



cmy. He remained under the parental roof- 
. tree until he was eighteen years old. After 
attaining his majority, he was engaged for six 
years in the retail shoe business in Cincin- 
nati. Returning to the East, he then came to 
Avon, and engaged in the manufacture of 
boots and shoes. Two of iiis brothers were at 
first associated with him, under the firm name 
of E. Tucker & Co. He was afterward in 
business with one brother, the firm name 
being Tucker & Brother. Later he retired 
from the shoe business, and was afterward for 
a number of years in the retail coal trade in 
East Stoughton. He is now the sole proiirie- 
tor of a large retail ice business in ]5rockton. 

On December 27, 1853, Mr. Tucker was 
married to Miss Almira Brett, a native of 
Rochester, Mass., who died in 1S91. She 
left one daughter, Ilattie L. , who is now the 
wife of Elmer C. Packard, of Brockton, Mass., 
and has two children, Nathan E. and Emerson 
H. In politics Mr. Tucker is a Republican. 
He was a member of the first committee 
called to promote the project of building the 
Avon Water Works, and of the first Board of 
Commissioners. He is still a member of the 
latter body, and he has served as its treasurer 
and superintendent since its organization. 
Mr. Tucker represented this district in the 
legislature in 1865, when Avon was still a 
part of the town of Stoughton. For two years 
he served as Selectman of the original town 
of Stoughton. Mr. Tucker is a member of 
the Boston branch of the American Legion of 
Honor. 



"irA ANH^L N. TOWER, a civil en- 

I 1 gineer and superintendent of the 

^_ X^y Gohasset Water Works, was born in 
Cohasset, Mass., February 28, 
1846, son of Abraham H. and Charlotte 
(Bates) Tower. His parents were natives of 
this town ; and a more complete account of his 
ancestry may be found in a sketch of his 
brother, Abraham H. Tower, which appears 
upon another page of the Revif.w. The sub- 
ject of this sketch was educated in the public 
schools, and also made a special study of civil 
engineering. He remained at home for some 
time, assisting his father, who carried on a 



large dairy farm. After the death of the elder 
Tower he went to National City, Southern 
California, where for two years he was en- 
gaged in mercantile business with Martin 
Sanders, under the firm name of .Sanders & 
Tower. Subsequently, selling out his inter- 
est in the concern, he returned to Cohasset, 
and in 1886 was appointed superintendent of 
the water-works. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. He is connected by membership with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Tower married Miss Almatia Josephine 
.Smith, daughter of Captain Joseph Smith, late 
of this town, and has two children — Bessie 
L. and (iilbert S. 




.AI'OLblON B. FURNALD, a Con- 
stable and Justice of the Peace of 
Oiiincy, was born in this town, 
August 24, 1828, son of Lemuel 
1^'urnald. The grandfather, Thomas Furnald, 
was a farmer in Nottingham, N.H., his native 
town. 

Lemuel Furnald, who was born and reared 
in Nottingham, assisted in the management of 
the parental homestead until after his mar- 
riage. Then, coming to Massachusetts, he 
was engaged in farming during the period of 
the War of 18 12 on Thompson's Island in 
Boston Harbor. Subsequently he removed to 
Hough's Neck, and there continued his chosen 
occupation for some years. In 1837 he gave 
u]j farming, and was thereafter engaged in the 
trade of stone-mason, making his home in 
Ouincy. He attended the Unitarian church, 
and, considering his means, was a liberal con- 
tributor toward its support. His wife, in 
maidenhood Mary Wiggin Evans, a native of 
Lee, N. H., and a daughter of Edmund Evans, 
had ten children, of whom two died young. 
The others were: Mary W. , born October 10, 
1806, who is the widow of Benjamin Freeman, 
late of Sumner, Me.; Caroline W., born Oc- 
tober 18, 1S08, who is the widow of Jonathan 
Merritt, late of Ouincy, Mass. : Eliza W., 
born December 6, 18 10, who was the wife of 
Joshua Fisher, of Dedham, Mass., and died 
March 8, 1S96; Harriet W., who married 
Aaron Ouimby, of Lyndon, Vt. ; Dolly E., 
born June 29, 1815, who died at the age of fif- 



48 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



teen years; Ann M., living in Ouincy, who 
successively married William T. Meade and 
the late William Everson ; Bryant N., born 
May 27, 1823, who died in 1894; and Napo- 
leon B., the subject of this biography. The 
father died June 4, 1850. 

Withdrawn from school at the age of twelve, 
Napoleon B. Furnald worked at various em- 
ployments until 1854. Beginning in that 
year, he dealt in and repaired furniture for 
nearly a score of years. On July 5, 1872, he 
was appointed by the Governor to the State 
constabulary force, on which he served until 
1875, when that branch of service was abol- 
ished. For many years thereafter he was en- 
gaged in detective work, also serving as Con- 
stable of Quincy. In the capacity of detec- 
tive he had charge of many notable cases. 
One of the more important was the Langmaid 
case, in which he discovered and arrested the 
murderer, and subsequently, by finding the 
knife with which the miscreant had severed 
his victim's head from her body, and procur- 
ing other evidence, had him convicted. He 
was the leader in the capture and conviction of 
James Henry Costley for the murder of Julia 
Hawk, a case which Judge Devens pronounced 
one of the most interesting murder cases in 
the history of the country. It was also en- 
tirely through his efforts that James MacKen- 
ney was convicted and sentenced for life, for 
the murder of William McCormick at Brain- 
tree. The State officers had given up this 
case, the medical examiner had given alcohol- 
ism as the cause of death, and the body had 
been buried a week when Mr. Furnald began 
his labors, with the result stated above. He 
has been in the detective business more or less 
for the past quarter of a century, and for more 
than a score of years he has held the commis- 
sion of Justice of the Peace. In addition, he 
does an extensive collecting business, giving 
a good deal of attention to delinquent tax- 
payers. 

Mr. I-'"urnald belongs to Mount Wollaston 
Lodge and Manet P^ncampment of the 
I. O. O. F. ; to Amana Lodge, Daughters of 
Rebecca; to Mahantom Tribe, I. O. R. M. ; 
to the Knights of Honor; and to the Knights 
and Ladies of Honor. In 1850 he married 
Elizabeth Fowles Dodge, a daughter of Ben- 



jamin Dodge, of Beverly, Mass. They have 
three children — Thomas E. , Mary Lizzie, 
and Henry Plumer. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fur- 
nald are members of the First Unitarian 
Church of Ouincy. 



/^STeORGE E. REED, treasurer of the 
y [5 I South Weymouth Savings Bank, was 
^ — born in this town, August 2, 1852, 
son of George and Maria H. (Vinal) Reed. 
The Reed family has long been identified 
with the town of Weymouth, which was the 
birthplace of George E. Reed's father, his 
mother being a native of Scituate. Several 
members of the family have been able and suc- 
cessful businessmen here; and Josiah Reed, 
an uncle of the subject of this sketch, was for 
several years president of the Savings Bank. 

George E. Reed was educated in his native 
town, and in his youth learned the art of 
telegraphy. For some time he was employed 
by the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Rail- 
road Company as a station operator in Michi- 
gan, Ohio, and Indiana, successively; and he 
was later employed by the Eastern Railway 
Company in the same capacity at Amesbury, 
Mass., and at Saco, Me. Returning to South 
Weymouth in 1887, he became book-keeper 
for H. B. Reed & Co., shoe manufacturers, 
with whom he remained until July i, 1895, 
when he was appointed to his present position 
of treasurer of the Savings Bank. He is also 
a member of the Board of Trustees. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and is now serving as 
Town Auditor. 

Mr. Reed married Clara A. Lowell, of Ken- 
nebunk. Me. ; and he and his wife are the par- 
ents of two daughters — Mary G. and Clara L. 
Mr. Reed is a Deacon of the Union Congrega- 
tional Church and treasurer of that society. 
He joined the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows in Saco, Me., and is still a member of 
the lodge in that city. 



-OHN PRESCOTT BIGELOW, of 

Ouincy, the secretary of Park County 
Gold Mining Company, with an office 
in Boston, was born June 17, 1848, in 
the house he now occupies. A son of Captain 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



49 



Jabez Bigelow, the fifth in the line of succes- 
sion bearing the name of Jabez, he is a de- 
scendant of an old Colonial family. His 
grandfather, Jabez Bigelow (fourth), was a 
farmer and shoemaker by occupation, and at 
one time was the proprietor of a hotel in 
Westminster, Mass., where he took a promi- 
nent part in town affairs, and served in the 
more important public offices. 

Captain Bigelow was born in Charlestown, 
Sullivan County, N.H., in 1801. He learned 
the boot-maker's trade, which he followed in 
Charlestown until 1830. In that year he 
came to Quincy, where he established himself 
as a manufacturer of shoes, and for many years 
after carried on a flourishing business, being 
one of the foremost manufacturers of his time. 
He was a strong Whig in his political affilia- 
tions, and he served on the Quincy School 
Board for a number of terms. For years he 
was Captain of the Quincy Light Infantry; and 
he was a member of Mount Wollaston Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. By his wife, Eliza, who was a 
daughter of Ebenezer Green, of Quincy, he be- 
came the father of ten children, si.\ of whom 
attained maturity. The latter were : Amanda, 
who married Dr. William G. Dawes, of Mai- 
den, Mass. ; Adelaide, who married Augustus 
Peabody, of Danvers, Mass. ; Josephine, the 
wife of Ira P. Goodale, also of Danvers; Lor- 
ing, who served in the Civil War, and was 
killed at the second battle of Bull Run; John 
Prescott, the subject of this biography; and 
Annie Maria, the wife of William Mason, of 
Binghamton, N.Y. The Captain and his wife 
were both members of the Adams Temple 
Unitarian Church. 

John P. Bigelow obtained his early educa- 
tion in the Quincy schools. Afterward he 
became the private secretary of Stephen Morse, 
a broker, who in former years had been his 
teacher. In 1868 he accepted the position of 
head book-keeper in the establishment of John 
H. Pray, Sons & Co., remaining with that 
firm ten years. From 1878 until 1884 he was 
employed as an expert accountant, and in the 
ensuing ten years he was an accountant in the 
Internal Revenue Department. In 1894 he 
started in business as an accountant and broker 
at 13 Exchange Street, Boston. Also, since 
then, he has been the secretary of the Park 



County Gold Mining Company, and he has be- 
come a director and the vice-president of the 
Alpha Tunnel Gold Mining Company. 

Mr. Bigelow is a member of Merry Mount 
Lodge, Knights of Honor. An ardent Repub- 
lican in i^olitics, he is the vice-chairman of the 
Republican City Committee. He was a mem- 
ber of the City Council two years, but he re- 
fused a nomination for Representative to the 
State legislature. In July, 1867, he was mar- 
ried to Sarah Gill Osborne, a daughter of 
Henry Osborne, of Hingham, Mass. Three 
of the children born to him have since died. 
The others are: Grace Green, the wife of 
Otis A. Edgarton, of Boston, Mass. ; John P. 
Bigelow, Jr.; Martin S. ; Loring; Jabez; and 
Celia Elizabeth. Both parents are members 
of the Adams Temple Unitarian Church. 




HARLES SIMMONS, the well-known 
contractor and builder of East Wey- 
mouth, was born September 3, 
1832, in the part of Scituate now 
called Norwell, son of Peleg and Lucy 
(Damon) Simmons, both also natives of Scit- 
uate. The Simmonses, like so many of the 
old-families in this section, can trace their an- 
cestry back to good old Pilgrim stock and to 
the earliest settlers. The founder, Moses 
Simmons, came to America on the ship "Fort- 
une," and landed at Plymouth Rock in 1621. 
One of the family's ancestors was a soldier of 
the Revolution. Mr. Simmons's father was a 
farmer by occupation and a lifelong resident 
of Norwell, where he was much respected. 

Beginning when he was eight years of age, 
Charles Simmons worked out on farms for 
eight years during the summer, and attended 
the three months" term of school in the 
winter. Living about a mile away from the 
school-house, he was obliged to walk the dis- 
tance even in the severe winter weather. At 
the age of sixteen he went to Boston, and 
began to learn the trade of carpenter and 
joiner. After two yeais spent there, he came 
in 1850 to East Weymouth, where he served 
another year as an apprentice. Then he 
worked as a journeyman until 1856, since 
which time he has followed the business of 
contractor and builder. He has built the 



s^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



^£ 






Masonic Hall in J<]a.st Weymouth, the Odd 
Fellows Hall in South Weymouth, and a 
number of public buildings, as well as many 
residences, in Weymouth town. He has also 
remodelled the Masonic Hall at Abington, 
built a school-house in Hingham, and a num- 
ber of summer cottages at Nantasket Beach. 

Mr. Simmons married Esther M. Stoddard, 
of Hingham, and has one daughter, Edith, 
now the wife of Wallace Bicknell, of Wey- 
mouth. He takes an earnest interest in the 
affairs of the town, and is a loyal supporter of 
the Republican party. He attends the Con- 
gregational church, and is a member of the 
Masons" and Odd Fellows' Lodges of East 
Weymouth, both of which organizations he 
has served in various capacities. 




MOS CHURCHILL, a venerable and 
honored citizen of Ouincy, Mass., 
who, by persistent toil, frugality, 
and judicious investments, acquired 
a handsome property, is now spending the de- 
clining years of his long and useful life in re- 
tirement. He was born at West Bolton, 
Canada West, December 31, 1816. A son of 
Amos Churchill, Sr., he comes of the English 
Churchills, one of the oldest families in Eng- 
land, who stood high in royal favor, and many 
of whom were knighted for deeds of valor 
and other meritorious conduct. The Ameri- 
can family began with Josiah Churchill, born 
in England, probably about the year 1612, 
who settled in Wethersfield, Conn., in i6ti6. 
In 1638 he married l-llizabeth, daughter of 
Nathaniel Foot. The children of this mar- 
riage were: Elizabeth, born January 15, 1642, 
who married Richard Buck; Hannah, born 
July I, i''>44; Anne, born in 1647; Joseph, 
the ne.xt in line of descent; Benjamin, born 
February 16, 1652; and Sarah, born Decem- 
ber 1 1, 1657. 

Joseph Churchill, born February 3, 1649, 
married Mary (surname unknown) on May 13, 
1674. Their children were: Mary, born 
April 6, 1675, who married David Edv/ards ; 
Nathaniel, born July 9, 1677, who married 
Mary Hulbert; Elizabeth, born in 1679, who 
married Thomas Butler; Dinah, born in 
1682, who became the wife of Thomas Wick- 



ham; Samuel, born in 1688, who married 
Martha Boardman ; Joseph, born in 1690, who 
married Lydia Dickerman ; David and Jona- 
than, twins, born in 1692; and Hannah, born 
in 1696. The line was continued through 
Jonathan, who was married, and reared three 
children, namely: Jonathan and Dorcas, 
twins, born in 1724; and William, born in 
1727. The second Jonathan married Lydia 
Smith, and they had ten children, namely: 
Oliver, who died in infancy; Jonathan, born 
November 25, 1749; Hezekiah, born Febru- 
^•■y 5> 1752; Josiah, born February 25, 1754; 
Lydia, born July 5, 1756; Moses, born De- 
cember I, 1759, who married Mary Crosby; 
Oliver, born April 15, 1762, who married 
Eunice Barnes; Rebecca, born July 20, 1764, 
who married Solomon Ranney; Abigail, born 
December 2, 1766, who died at the age of four 
years; and Amos, the father of the subject of 
this sketch. 

Amos Churchill, Sr., was born October 19, 
1770, in Connecticut, where he learned the 
trade of a tanner. He subsequently went to 
Fairfax, Vt., and thence to Canada, where he 
was for several years engaged as a shoe manu- 
facturer and farmer in the town of West Bol- 
ton. Eventually he returned to his former 
home in Fairfax, Vt., where he spent the re- 
mainder of his life, and died at the advanced 
age of eighty-six years, a worthy and respected 
citizen. On October 25, 1795, he married 
Deborah Thornton, who was born in Rhode 
Island, December 26, 1776. They became 
the parents of ten children, born as follows: 
Electa, December 14, 1796; Leman, May 6, 
1798; Hiram, December 5, 1800; Constant, 
November 2, 1802; Oliver, January 28, 1804; 
Harriet, March 6, 1808; Otis, May 28, 1810; 
Deborah, May 6, 1812; Harlow, August 12, 
1814; and Amos, the subject of this biog- 
raphy. 

The early years of Amos Churchill were 
chiefly employed in working on the home farm 
and attending the district school during the 
winter terms. After attaining his majority% 
he came to Massachusetts, and learned stone- 
cutting in Medford. Here he afterv.'ard 
worked as a journeyman for three years. He 
settled in Westford, Vt., after his marriage, 
and was there engaged in general farming for 




FREDERICK TOWER. 



IMOCRAI'IIICAI, KF.VIKW 



S3 



two or more years. In 1845, desirous of re- 
suming his trade, he came to Quincy, Mass., 
where for twenty years he was employed in 
stone-cuttin<;- for other people. During the 
latter part of tiiis period he hail charge of the 
granite works of Williams & Spellman. In 
1865, having by this time saved some money, 
he formed a partnership with Charles R. 
Mitchell, and under the name of the Mitchell 
Granite Works began to quarry and cut and 
polish gi-anite. Four years later Mr. Church- 
ill purchased his partner's interest, and there- 
after conducted a very lucrative business until 
his retirement from active work in April, 
1892. The product of his establishment was 
widely reputed for superior quality and finish, 
and met with a ready sale in all parts of the 
Union. 

Mr. Churchill is a stanch Republican in 
politics. Public-spirited and liberal, he takes 
a deep interest in the welfare of the city. An 
esteemed Mason, he belongs to Rural Lodge 
of Ouincy and to the South Shore Command- 
ery of East Weymouth. On September 27, 
1842, he married Lucretia, the seventh child 
and youngest daughter of Alexander Rowe, of 
Campton, N.H. Mr. Rowe, who was born 
in Moultonboro, N.H., February 17, 1780, 
lived to the age of fourscore years. In 1805 
he married Sally Bean, who was born at 
Sandwich, N.H., April 9, 1787, and died at 
Campton, July 28, 1840. Their daughter Lu- 
cretia was born in Campton, N.H., January 4, 
1824. Mr. and Mrs. Churchill have one 
child, Ellen B., who married J. H. Emery, of 
Quincy, Mass., and has two children — Alice 
J. and Florence B. 




DONIRAM J. WHITE, the well-known 
wholesale and retail milk dealer of 
Braintree, was born here, October 
23, 1834, son of Livingston and 
Maria (Capen) White. He is a direct de- 
scendant of Captain Thomas White, who was 
a Selectman and a prominent resident of Wey- 
mouth in 1640. Michael White, his grand- 
father, was First Lieutenant of a company in 
the Revolutionary War; and an uncle, Captain 
Calvin White, was a soldier in the War of 
1812. 



Livingston White, who was a native of 
Randolph, early in life came to Braintree, 
where he carried on the manufacture of boots 
and shoes, and was also engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits. In the latter part of his life 
his entire attention was given to the milk busi- 
ness. During the forties he served as Se- 
lectman of I^raintree. While an enterprising 
business man, he was a member of the Baptist 
church and a consistent Christian. Two of 
his children survive — Adaline and Adoniram, 
both residing in this town. 

Adoniram J. White received a common- 
school education in his native place. From 
his youth he has been engaged in the milk 
business, in which line he has been very suc- 
cessful. Ill politics he is a Republican, and 
he takes much interest in the welfare of the 
town. Though often solicited to run for office, 
he has never permitted the use of his name, 
preferring the quietude of his home life. He 
married Emma 1'. Chi Ids, a daughter of the 
late Rev. Mr. Childs, of Gilmanton, N.H. 
Mr. White is a member of the Baptist church, 
and is familiarly known as Deacon White, 
from his office in that church. 



/^APTAIN FREDERICK TOWER, of 
I Vj-^ Cohasset, superintendent in the 

\^U^^ United States light-house .Service, 
was born in Cohasset, October 31, 
1820. His parents were Captain Nichols and 
Anna (Bates) Tower. 

Captain Nichols Tower was a seafaring man 
and a vessel-owner, engaged for years in mack- 
erel fishing. He was also for a long period 
in the insurance business, acting as agent for 
several companies. Active, capable, and ju- 
dicious, he was highly respected, and was 
elected to various public offices. He served 
as Selectman and Overseer of the Poor in Co- 
hasset, and for a number of terms represented 
the town in the General Court. He had com- 
mand of a company of militia, and served in 
the War of 181 2. 

Frederick Tower was reared and educated in 
Cohasset. He naturally took to the sea, and 
in 1 84 1, when he was twenty-one years old, 
began to assist in putting down buoys. He 
was occupied in this way also during a part of 



54 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the following year. A few years later, char- 
tering his vessel, he assisted in building the 
first light-house on Minot's Ledge. This 
work kept him employed during a part of 
1847, 1848, and 1849. In 1850 he signed a 
contract with the government, agreeing to take 
care of buoys and beacons for two years in 
Ipswich, Boston, and Cape Cod Bays, the 
north-eastern part of what is now the Second 
Light-house District; and he gave bonds to 
paint the buoys in accordance with the act of 
Congress requiring red on the starboard and 
black on the port side. His work was so sat- 
isfactory to the collector of the port of Boston 
that when his contract expired in 1852, just 
after the Light-house Board had been estab- 
lished, that gentleman gave him a letter 
to Commodore Downs, United States Navy, 
the first Light-house Inspector. Commodore 
Downs hired Captain Tower to put down 
buoys by the piece, the Captain furnishing 
everything required. In March, 1853, the In- 
spector bought the buoys, sinkers, etc., which 
Captain Tower then had on hand, chartered 
his vessel for a buoy tender, and engaged the 
Captain to command her. Commodore Downs 
was an old man, and shortly resigned his posi- 
tion as Inspector; and Lieutenant Knox of the 
United States Navy was appointed in his 
place. In June, 1853, the new Inspector 
bought at New Bedford a vessel of forty -seven 
tons, which was taken to the navy-yard at 
Charlestown, and fitted for a light-house 
tender. She was the first government light- 
house tender in the district. The name first 
given her was "The Elizabeth," but on ac- 
count of her speed she was afterward called 
the "Active." In July, 1853, Captain Tower 
was placed in charge of this vessel, and dur- 
ing the war he was instructed to keep on the 
lookout for strange vessels, and when he 
sighted one to run for the nearest port, and 
telegraph to Boston. In 1870 Inspector Com- 
modore Blake, United States Navy, transferred 
him to the district then in charge of General 
James C. Duane, United States Army; and 
the Captain went to Portland with his vessel 
in July. In December of the same year he 
was given a position in the light-house en- 
gineer's office in Boston. He has now been 
identified with the light-house service for 



over half a century, and is one of the most 
valued and trusted employees of the govern- 
ment. From the establishment of the Light- 
house Board in 1852 until the present time 
(the fall of 1897), forty-five years, he has 
had but one week's vacation. His services 
are confined to the First and Second Light- 
house Districts. With the exception of his 
failing sight, CajUain Tower is still active 
and in good health, though seventy - seven 
years old. 

In February, 1844, he was married to Eliz- 
abeth P. Bates, who bore him four children, 
of whom two are now living — Anna B. and 
David B. Captain Tower was originally a 
Whig, and has been affiliated with the Repub- 
lican party since its birth. He belongs to 
Mount Lebanon Lodge, F. & A. M., of Bos- 
ton; the Consistory in the same city; and has 
taken all but the last degree of the Scottish 
Rites. He has a large circle of acquaint- 
ances, and is highly esteemed wherever he is 
known. 



1849, 
sided 



OHN H. STETSON, cashier of the 
First National Bank of South Wey- 
mouth and Treasurer of the town, was 
born in East Sumner, Me., October 28, 
son of Solomon M. Stetson. He re- 
in his native town until fourteen years 
old, when he moved with his parents to Hart- 
ford, Me., and his education was acquired in 
the public schools, both common and high. 
After teaching several terms of school in his 
native State, in 1872 he came to Massachu- 
setts, and settled in South Weymouth. He 
was appointed assistant cashier of the First 
National Bank in 1874, and since 1880 has 
ably filled the position of cashier. He is 
also a director and a member of the Invest- 
ment Committee. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, and has served as Town Treasurer since 
1885. He is a member of the Board of 
Water Commissioners and a trustee of the 
John S. Fogg Fund. He is connected with 
Orphans' Hope Lodge, F. & A. M. ; South 
Shore Commandery, K. T. ; and is a charter 
member of Wildey Lodge, I. O. O. F. Mr. 
Stetson married Emily T. White, by whom he 
has one daughter, Anna M. He is deeply in- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



55 



terested in the general welfare of the town 
and the development of its business resources, 
and is much esteemed for his persona! worth 
and public spirit. 



T^HARLES MONROE JENNESS, of 
I v-^ Ouincy, a dealer in hardware and 
^^Hs artists' materials, was born March 

2g, 1867, at North Hampton, Rock- 
ingham County, N.H., a son of Richard Jen- 
ness. Of English origin, this family for sev- 
eral generations gave leading citizens to the 
maritime part of New Hampshire, and at one 
time owned a large portion of the town of 
Rye. John Bean Jenness, the great-grand- 
father of Charles M., died August 21, 1S40, 
aged seventy-seven years. His son, Richard 
Jenness, Sr., the next in line of descent, who 
was a farmer in New Hampshire, died at Rye 
Beach, February 28, 1S68, aged eighty-three 
years. 

Richard Jenness, Jr., born at Rye Beach in 
1825, died in that place December 6, 1885. 
He learned the carpenter's trade in early man- 
hood, and, coming to Boston, worked as car- 
penter and builder for some years, being known 
as a superior workman. When his parents be- 
came advanced in years, he returned to the 
old homestead in Rye, and was thereafter en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits on the ances- 
tral farm until his demise. A sound Demo- 
crat in politics, he was very active in local 
affairs, took a deep interest in educational 
matters, and filled various town offices. He 
married Sarah B., daughter of Stacy Page, of 
North Hampton, N.H., and reared with her 
two children — Charles Monroe and Ivan 
Douglas. In religious belief he was a Uni- 
versalist, and his wife was an Adventist. 

Having received his elementary education 
in the common schools, Charles Monroe Jen- 
ness completed his studies at Comer's Com- 
mercial College in Boston. Subsequently he 
learned the carpenter's trade from his father, 
and followed it for about three years, being 
at Fort Meade, Fla., for one year. In 1889 
he located in Ouincy, and for nearly a year 
worked at carpentering in this town. Then 
he purchased his present hardware store of 
Samuel Spear. By systematic and progres- 



sive methods he has since acquired a large 
business, and made his establishment the 
headquarters of the surrounding district for 
the line of goods that he carries. 

Mr. Jenness is one of the leading Republi- 
cans of this section of the county, and has 
been a delegate to both county and State con- 
ventions of his party. He is a member of 
Mount Wollaston Lodge and Manet Encamp- 
ment, I. O. O. F. ; of Carrie E. Ruggles 
Lodge, Rebecca Degree; of Grand Canton 
Shawmut, of Boston; of Maple Lodge, 
Knights and Ladies of Honor; of the Knights 
of Malta, Boston Commandery; of the Phile- 
dian Senate, K. A. E. O., of which he is Ex- 
cellent Senator; and of the Princes of Kem, 
of which he is Illustrious Khedive. 



OHN A. RAYMOND, clerk and treas- 
urer of the East Weymouth Savings 
Bank and Town Clerk of Weymouth, 
was born here, January 9, 1848, son of 
Robert B. and Lavina P. (Nash) Raymond, 
both parents natives of this town. 

The Raymond family came from Middle- 
boro, the first in Weymouth being Alvah, a 
shoe manufacturer, grandfather of Mr. John 
A. He fought as a soldier in the War of 
1 812, and was very influential as a citizen, 
taking an active part in all public affairs, 
holding the offices of Selectman and Overseer 
of the Poor, and serving also as Representa- 
tive to the legislature. A great-grandfather 
of Mr. John A. Raymond, Robert Bates, was 
a soldier of the Revolution. Robert B. Ray- 
mond, above named, was a shoe cutter by trade 
and a man of decided musical ability. He was 
a prominent citizen, and universally esteemed. 

Mr. John A. Raymond passed his boyhood 
in his native town, and was educated in the 
common schools. At the age of fifteen he 
began his working life as clerk in the mercan- 
tile business of Henry Loud, of East Wey- 
mouth; and he remained in this business for a 
quarter of a century. His trustworthiness 
was fully demonstrated here, his painstaking 
and exact business methods were recognized, 
and in 1888 he was chosen clerk and treasurer 
of the East Weymouth Savings Bank. This 
responsible position he has filled to the present 



S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



time, commanding the entire confidence of the 
public, and looked up to as a man of unques- 
tioned honor. Mr. Raymond is likewise treas- 
urer of the Congregational Society of East 
Weymouth. In 1879 h<^ was elected Town 
Clerk of Weymouth; and he has been re- 
elected every year since, his long term of 
office bearing testimony to the efficiency of 
his service. 

Mr. Raymond married Alberta Waldron, of 
Augusta, Me., and is the father of si.x chil- 
dren—Fred W., Emma VV., Alberta W., 
Robert 11, Walter L. , and Marion. He is a 
member of Orphans' Hope Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of East Weymouth; of Crescent Lodge, 
L O. O. F., of East Weymouth ; and trustee 
of Pilgrim Lodge, K. of H. He is a qualified 
Notary Public and Justice of the Peace, and 
is one of the most progressive and energetic 
citizens of the town. 



/^2rK()RGH 11. HITCHCOCK, a wcU- 
\ '•) I known dealer in granite, carrying on 
an extensive business in Quincy, was 
born in Boston, Mass., April 7, 1846, a son of 
Jesse Hitchcock. He is a representative of 
one of the earliest families of New England 
and a direct descendant of one of the founders 
of New Haven, Conn. It is supposed that the 
Hitchcock family originated in Wiltshire, Eng- 
land, where land was held in their name from 
the time of William the Conqueror. Its 
founder in this country, Matthias Hitchcock, 
who was born in 1610, came from London, 
England, to Boston on the bark "Sarah and 
Ellen," in the spring of 1635. He was a res- 
ident of Watertown, Mass., in 1636, receiving 
in that year twenty-three acres of land in the 
"Great Dividends." His name appears in 
the records of New Haven, Conn., as one of 
the original signers of the "foundamental 
agreement made on the 4th of the fowereth 
moneth, called June, 1639." He was also one 
of the five purchasers of the "South End 
Neck," now Flast Haven, Conn., where he, 
with the other four owners, resided after 1651. 
Nathaniel Hitchcock, son of Matthias, and 
a native of New Haven, Conn., was there 
married January 18, 1670, to Elizabeth Moss, 
who was born in the town, October 3, 1652, 



daughter of John Moss. The next in line of 
descent was their son, John Hitchcock, first, 
who was born in East Haven, January 28, 
1685, and died there, October 14, 1753. He 
was a member of the legislature during seven- 
teen sessions, from 1739 until 1747, and was 
a Deacon of the First Church of New Haven 
from 1742 until his death. His first wife, 
Mary, was a daughter of Stephen Thompson. 
She was married to him March 4 of either 
1707 or 1708, and died in the following year, 
on February 27. His second wife was Abiah 
Bassett Hitchcock. His only child by the 
first wife, John Hitchcock (second), who was 
born on January i of either 1708 or 1709, 
married on March i, 1732 or 1733, Esther 
Ford, a daughter of Matthew Ford. She died 
in New Haven, Conn., July 11, 1749. The 
second wife of John Hitchcock (second) was 
the mother of John Hitchcock (third), and, 
surviving her husband, who died in July, 
1764, was married again. The third John 
Hitchcock, born in New Haven, Conn., mar- 
ried on May 2, 1774, Phebe Tyler, who was 
born May 21, 1756, in Wallingford, Conn., 
daughter of Colonel Ben Tyler. On May 16, 
1768, he became one of the original settlers of 
Claremont, N. H., where both he and his wife 
spent their last years. Her death occurred 
January 30, 1820, and his, July 19, 1835. 
Their son, Jesse Hitchcock, the grandfather 
of George H., was born in Claremont, January 
7, 1794. He had worked at the trade of mill- 
wright in Claremont for some time when, in 
1842, he became a resident of Drewsville, in 
the town of Walpole, N.H., where he re- 
mained until his demise, March 26, 1865. 
On July 9, 181 7, he married Chloe Grandy, 
who was born September 7, 1796, daughter of 
Colonel Benjamin Grandy, and who died 
April 6, i860. 

Jesse Hitchcock, Jr., who was born in 
Claremont, N.H., February 13, 1818, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools 
and at an academy of his native town. On 
attaining his majority, he located in Boston, 
Mass., where he lived for some years. Then 
he established himself in the mercantile busi- 
ness in Vermont. Afterward he returned to 
Boston, and kept a hotel and had a restaurant 
business for some time. He retired from ac- 




CEORGE H. HITCHCOCK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



59 



tive pursuits several years prior to liis death, 
which occurred October 4, 1896. In 1843 he 
married Susan K., daughter of Joseph Storey 
Foster, of Essex, Mass. She died January 
15, 1858, leaving these children, namely: 
Charles E., born June 27, 1844, who lives in 
Washington, D.C. ; George H., the special 
subject of this sketch; Fanny V., born No- 
vember 15, 1847, who died October 16, 1870; 
Susan v., born December 2, 1849, who is the 
wife of Albion C. Colby, now of Brockton, 
Mass.; Lucy F., born October 2, 1852, who 
married Samuel Williams, of Boston; and 
Hiram A., born May 13, 1857, who at the 
time of his death, January 27, 1895, was pro- 
fessor of civil engineering at Dartmouth Col- 
lege. Both parents were liberal in their re- 
ligious beliefs, and attended the Universalist 
church. 

Having completed his education in the Bos- 
ton public schools, George H. Hitchcock went 
to work in a wholesale leather store of that 
city, and was there employed until after the 
Boston fire in November, 1872. Coming then 
to Ouincy, he established his ]iresent busi- 
ness. He does monumental work as well as 
building, and has been ciuite successful. He 
has one of the finest quarries in the State, the 
]iroduct of which is favorably known in New 
York and New luigland. Among many large 
and costly buildings for which he has fur- 
nished the material may be mentioned the 
Tribune Building and the Central Park Mu- 
seum of Natural History in New York. He 
is now serving as one of the directors of the 
National Granite Bank of Quincy. 

Mr. Hitchcock was married April 18, 1872, 
to Ellen E., daughter of Thomas Baker, of 
Marshfield, Mass. They have three children, 
namely: Fanny V., the wife of J. Percival 
Sears, of this city; Fay M. ; and Foster. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hitchcock attend the Congrega- 
tional church. In politics Mr. Hitchcock is a 
consistent Republican. 



RADFORD HAWES, clerk of the 
Board of Selectmen of Weymouth 
IN-' J and a well-known citizen of Norfolk 
County, was born in Weymouth, De- 
cember 20, 1843, son of Captain Joseph and 




Sarah (Pratt) Hawes, both natives of this 
town, where his paternal grandfather, Joseph 
Hawes, Sr., was a lifelong resident. Joseph 
Hawes, the younger, better known as Cajitain 
Joseph Hawes, was engaged in the fishery 
business, trading principally in mackerel for 
about forty years. He was master of different 
schooners during that time, and sailed from 
the port of Hingham, Mass. He served as a 
Highway Surveyor of Weymouth, and took an 
interest in building and repairing the roads of 
the town. He was Republican in |)olitics. 

Bradford Hawes was educated in the schools 
in Weymouth. In November, 1861, at the 
age of eighteen years, he enlisted in Company 
K, First Massachusetts Cavalry, and was 
attached to the army operating on the coast of 
South Carolina and Florida, and at a later 
period to the Army of the James. He was in 
the battle of Olustee, Fla. , and when with 
the cavalry along the James was more or less 
under fire a great deal of the time. Much of 
the last year of his service he was in the hos- 
pital department of the Fourth Massachusetts 
Cavalry as nurse and steward. Receiving his 
honorable discharge, November 10, 1864, he 
returned to Weymouth, and was employed in 
the shoe business until the spring of 1893. 
In that year he was elected a Selectman of the 
town, and each succeeding year he has been 
unanimously re-elected. During his first 
year as .Selectman he was chairman of the 
board. He is now clerk of the board, and is 
also now serving his tenth year on the .School 
Board, his entire time for the past four years 
having been devoted to town business. In 
politics he is a stanch Republican. 

Mr. Hawes married Jeannette Fairbanks, 
daughter of George Fairbanks, of Weymouth. 
They have had seven children, as follows: Jo- 
seph H., instructor in drawing in the New 
Hampshire College of Agriculture and Indus- 
trial Arts; Wilton L. ; Susan H.; Rachel 
L. ; Catherine J.; Helen W. ; and Harold A. 
Mr. Bradford Hawes is a man who has risen 
by his own unaided efforts. He is public- 
spirited, devoted to the best interests of the 
town, and has served for many years on the 
Republican Town Committee. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church at Weymouth. He 
is a Grand Army man, belonging to Reynolds 



6o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Post, No. 58, and is now officiating as Chap- 
lain of the post, having previously served as 
Adjutant. 




lALPH HOUGHTON, a well-known 
and esteemed citizen of Randolph, 
was born in New York City, No- 
vember 14, 1819. His father 
Ralph Houghton, son of Jason, was a native 
of Milton, Mass.; and his mother, Mary 
Marsh Houghton, was a native of Boston. 
Mr. Houghton is a lineal descendant of an 
English-born Ralph Houghton, who came to 
this country in 1647, first settling in Lancas- 
ter, Mass., and later removing to Milton, 
where he spent the rest of his life. One of 
Mr. Houghton's great-grandfathers was Jo- 
seph Wild, who was a commissioned officer in 
the Continental army during the Revolution- 
ary War. 

Jason Houghton, the paternal grandfather 
above named, was a lifelong resident of Mil- 
ton. Jason's son Ralph, when a young man, 
learned the trade of a baker in Hingham, 
Mass. ; and during the War of 181 2 he and his 
next older brother were stationed at one of 
the forts in Boston Harbor. Some time after- 
ward he engaged in business for himself in 
New York City. He eventually returned to 
Milton, and died there in 1822. 

Ralph Houghton, the subject of this sketch, 
resided with his grandfather Houghton in Mil- 
ton from the time of his father's death till he 
reached his fourteenth year. He then went 
to New York City, where he attended school, 
and was later employed in driving a baker's 
wagon for his uncle, George W. Houghton, 
who had succeeded to the business formerly 
carried on by his father. In 1837 he returned 
to Milton; and in 1843, after learning the 
cabinet-maker's trade, he established himself 
in business in Randolph. For a long time 
Mr. Houghton made a specialty of manufactur- 
ing coffins, but for several years past he has 
given his entire attention to the business of 
an undertaker and director of funerals. He 
stands high in the estimation of his fellow- 
townsmen, has served as Constable, and was at 
one time a Coroner. In politics he is inde- 
pendent. He has occupied important chairs 



in Norfolk Union Lodge, F. & A. M.; and 
Rising Star Lodge, No. ^6, I. O. O. F. 

In 1842 Mr. Houghton was joined in mar- 
riage with Martha M. Bennett, a native of 
Bridgton, Me. She became the mother of 
five children, three of whom are living, 
namely: Mary F. ; Martha R., now Mrs. Cart- 
wright, a widow; and Helen M. Houghton. 
Mrs. Houghton died in June, 1887. 



LBERT J. NEWELL, an enterprising 
farmer of South Franklin, Mass., and 



/j|^\ a son of Arnold J. and Eliza (Frost) 
^■^ Newell, was born in Franklin, May 
'7. 1839. His grandfather was Dexter New- 
ell, of Cumberland, R.I., who married Syl- 
vania Brown, of Cumberland. Their son Ar- 
nold moved to Franklin about the year 1837, 
and there worked at his trade of boat-builder 
for many years, besides carrying on his farm. 
In his later years he devoted himself wholly 
to farming. He died in 1887, and his wife is 
now living in Franklin with her son Allen. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Newell had twelve chil- 
dren, namely: Amelia, who married Frank 
Boyden, of East Walpole, Mass.; Allen, who 
is a carpenter; Miranda, who married Harry 
Bryant, a show man in Boston ; Sarah and 
Harriet, both deceased; Albert, the subject 
of this sketch; Mary, the widow .of William 
Green, of Vermont ; Evelyn, deceased, who 
was the wife of Alfred Clarke, of Franklin; 
Henry, also dead; Anna, who married Daniel 
Corbin, of Franklin; Shady, deceased; and 
Reed, who married Marion Watson, of Frank- 
lin. 

Albert J. Newell was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Franklin and at Walpole. He 
left home when he was but thirteen years old, 
and went to work for Colonel P. B. Clark, of 
Franklin, with whom he remained for about 
fifteen years, working on the farm. Then he 
worked in a straw shop for twenty years. In 
1862 he enlisted in Company K of the 
Twenty-third Massachusetts Volunteer Infan- 
try, under Captain Hart, and subsequently in 
the Civil War took part in the engagements 
at Newbury, White Hall, Hilton Head, and 
Spottsylvania, besides many skirmishes, com- 
ing out of all without a wound. When his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



term of enlistment expired, he returned to 
Franklin, and there worked on a farm for the 
ensuing five years. Then he was employed in 
a straw shop again for two years. After that 
he went to Lawrence, Mass., and engaged in 
the shoe business for a while. In 1882 he 
settled on the old Colonel P. B. Clark place 
in South Franklin, where he has lived since, 
occupied in general farming, but making a 
specialty of the milk business. Besides the 
one hundred acres of land in his farm proper, 
he owns several lots elsewhere. The measure 
of prosperity he now enjoys has been well 
earned by hard work. He is a member of the 
G. A. R. of Franklin, and he attends the Con- 
gregational church. 

Mr. Newell was married December 28, 
1864, to Betsey W. Clark, of Franklin. Her 
father, Colonel Paul B. Clark, was a school- 
master for twenty years, teaching in Frank- 
lin, Medway, VVrentham, Canton, Randoljih, 
Bellingham, Braintree, Walpole, and Frank- 
lin. He was on the School Committee of 
Franklin for a number of years; and he was 
Overseer of the Poor, Tax Collector, and Rep- 
resentative to the State legislature in 1849. 
Colonel Clark was a member of the Congrega- 
tional churches in Franklin and South Frank- 
lin for over sixty years, and he was one of the 
Jiiost efficient church workers. His death oc- 
curred August I, 1894, and that of his wife, 
\n maidenhood Abigail Ann Wheeler, of 
Millis, Mass., on March 13, 1882. They had 
four children, of whom Mrs. Newell and Mercy 
are living. The latter is the wife of Henry 
Clarke, of Franklin. Mr. and Mrs. Newell 
have had six children: Abbie Ella and Eliza 
Harding, living at home; Henry C, dead; 
Arthur John, living at home; and two who 
died in infancy. 



LIAS ANDREWS PERKINS, who is 
living in retirement in Quincy, this 
county, enjoying the fruits of his 
early years of industry, was born July 28, 
1822, in Alexandria, N.H., son of Elias Per- 
kins. He is a lineal descendant of John 
Perkins, who was born in Newentj Gloucester 
shire, England, in 1590. This ancestor, on 
December 1, 1630, came to America with his 



wife and five children. He left England in the 
ship "Lion," on which Roger Williams was 
also a passenger. For two years after his 
arrival he lived in Boston. Then he removed 
to Ipswich, where he was engaged in farming 
until his death, in 1654. He was a De])uty 
to the General Court held in Bostcm, May 25, 
1636, and served on the (jrand Jury in 1648 
and 1652. 

John Perkins, Jr., born in England in 1614, 
came to Massachusetts with his parents in 
163 1. He went to Ipswich in 1633, and 
there resided until his death, December 14, 
1686. He opened the first public house in 
that town, was (Juartermaster of the first mil- 
itary organization of the territory and one of 
the largest landholders of that part of Essex 
County. His wife, Elizabeth, whose last 
name is unknown, and whom he married in 
1635, died September 27, 1684. Their son 
Isaac, who was born in Ipswich in 1650, mar- 
ried in 1669 Hannah, daughter of Alexander 
Knight. Isaac Perkins, Jr., born in Ipswich, 
May 23, 1676, was master of a ship for man)' 
years, and was well known as Captain Isaac 
Perkins in Boston, where he resided for some 
time. The first of his two marriages was con- 
tracted June 3, 1703, with Mary Pike, or 
Picket, who died in 1720. The second, on 
October 10, 1723, united him to Mrs. Lydia 
Vifian, the widow of John Vifian. He died 
June 14, 1725. His children were all born of 
his first marriage. 

Jacob Perkins, son of Captain Perkins and 
great-grandfather of Elias A., was born in 
Chebacco parish, Ipswich, in 1717. In his 
early years he worked at shoemaking. Later 
in life he was engaged in farming. On Au- 
gust 30, 1743, he married Elizabeth Strong. 
Jacob Perkins, Jr., born in Chebacco parish, 
Ipswich, June 27, 1748, was there reared to 
agricultural pursuits. In 1783 he purchased 
wild land in Hebron, N.H. From this he 
cleared a farm, which he made his home for 
the remainder of his life, and died May 21, 
1S23. He was an honest, God-fearing man, 
eminently devout and strict in all things. On 
July 28, 1774, he married Hannah Andrews, 
who was born April 26, 1753, and died De- 
cember 21, 1845. 

Elia-s Perkins, son of Jacob Perkins, Jr., was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



born on the homestead in Hebron, N. H., 
March i8, 1794- He received such education 
as the limited opportunities of those days 
afforded. When a young man he spent a few 
years engaged in farming near Boston, Mass. 
Subsequently he returned to New Hampshire, 
and, buying a farm in the town of Alexandria, 
was afterward engaged in its management 
until his death in 1863. He was among the 
leading agriculturists of the county in which 
he resided, making the raising of cattle his 
especial business. Prominent in local affairs, 
he represented the town in the State legislat- 
ure, was Selectman for several years, and a 
Justice of the Peace for a long period. In 
connection with the last-named office he had 
the guardianship of a number of children at 
different times, and transacted a good deal of 
probate business. He was known and re- 
spected as a just and honest man. He en- 
listed for service in the War of 1812, but did 
not go beyond Portsmouth, as hostilities had 
ended before he reached there. With his 
wife, Rhoda, who was a daughter of Gideon 
Simonds, of Burlington, Mass., he reared 
four children, namely: Louisa Adams, who 
married Luke Gale, of Alexandria; Elias 
Andrews, the subject of this biography; Han- 
nah A., the wife of David Rollins, formerly 
of Alexandria, but now of Groton, Mass. ; and 
Holbrook S. , of Alexandria. Both parents 
attended the Baptist church. 

Elias A. Perkins was reared and educated 
in his native town, remaining on the home 
farm until he was twenty-two years old. 
Coming then to this county, he worked at the 
carpenter's trade in Ouincy. Having already 
learned the use of tools while a boy, he was 
paid journeyman's wages at the end of a year. 
After nine years' experience as a journeyman, 
he started in business for himself, locating in 
Dorchester as a carpenter and builder, remain- 
ing there imtil 1865, when he settled perma- 
nently in Ouincy. He carried on a very 
extensive business, erecting many houses, 
public buildings, and churches in towns near 
Boston, and at times employing from twenty 
to twenty-five men. For the past twelve or 
fourteen years he has been a trustee of the 
Quincy Savings Bank and a member of its 
Board of Investment. He is also a director of 



the Dorchester Mutual Insurance Company 
and of the Quincy Co-operative Bank. 

Mr. Perkins has been identified with the 
Republican party since its formation, and has 
always taken an active part in politics. He 
was a member of the Ouincy Board of Select- 
men for four successive years. After the city 
charter was adopted, he served on the Board 
of Assessors for some time, being principal 
assessor for one year. He is a life member of 
the Mechanics' Charitable Association, which 
he joined in 1874. In 1863 he was married 
to. Miss Mary Frances Hills, a daughter of 
Alden Hills, of Hudson, N. H. He attends 
the Unitarian church, and is very broad and 
liberal in his religious beliefs. 




ILLIAM H. H. HANCOCK, a 

well-known and reliable jeweller of 
Cohasset, was born in this town, 
October 16, 1840, son of Horace and Susan 
(Stoddard) Hancock. The Hancocks are of 
English extraction. Horace Hancock was 
born in Winchendon, Mass., in i8co. He lo- 
cated in Cohasset when a young man, and for 
some time was engaged in shoemaking. His 
later years were devoted to the pursuit of agri- 
culture. He died in 1881. Mrs. Hancock, 
who was born in Cohasset in 1802, and died 
in 1879, was of Scotch descent. Her father, 
Major James Stoddard, was a member of the 
famous Boston Tea Party, and served as an 
artificer in the Continental army. He was 
among the sufferers at Valley Forge during 
the terrible winter of 1777-78. 

William H. H. Hancock was educated in 
the public schools "of Cohasset. He left 
school at the age of thirteen; but by reading 
and observation he has amply made up the de- 
ficiencies in his early training, and he is well 
informed on all matters of practical impor- 
tance. Engaging in the manufacture of boots 
and shoes in Cohasset in 1871, he was so oc- 
cupied something over two years. In 1874 
he opened a shop for making and repairing 
watches, and some time later he added miscel- 
laneous jewelry to his stock in trade. He 
now has a prosperous business. Mr. Hancock 
is a Republican, politically. Actively inter- 
ested in the welfare of the town, he has been 




. »: 




AMORY FISHER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



6S 



solicited to accept public office, but has uiod- 
estly refused. He is widely known and highly 
respected. 




FISHER, for many years a 
lent business man of Dedham, 

born November 4, 18 18, in 
Bolton, Mass., and died at his 
home on Church Street, Dedham, March 20, 
1894. His father, Jacob Fisher, was a farmer 
in Bolton, where he was a lifelong resident. 

Amory Fisher learned the trade of a chair- 
maker in his younger days; but, after coming 
to Dedham in 1S37, he worked for Joel Rich- 
ards in the bobbin factory a number of years, 
then engaged in the barber's business, having 
his office in his dwelling-house, and later 
opened a market near by. He finally em- 
barked in the coal and ice trade, which he 
carried on successfully for half a century, 
being at the time of his death one of the old- 
est merchants in this locality. Energetic, ca- 
pable, and strictly honest in his dealings, a 
useful citizen, he was held in high respect, 
and, departing, was greatly missed throughout 
the community. He was a member of the 
Orthodo.x Congregational church, to which 
Mrs. Fisher also belongs. 

On April 6, 1841, Amory Fisher married 
Miss Elizabeth Dexter Everett, who was born' 
in Dedham, near the Hyde Park line, Novem- 
ber 10, 1818. Her father, Nathan Everett, 
who was one of a family of four children, was 
a native of Dedham, where his parents spent 
the later years of their lives. He was a stone- 
cutter by trade, and was also a contractor, and 
as such did much general work about the 
neighborhood. He moved to the village of 
Dedham when Mrs. Fisher was a young child, 
and there lived until his death, at the age of 
fifty-five years. The maiden name of the wife 
of Mr. Everett was Hepzibah Colburn. She 
was born in West Dedham in 1797, being the 
descendant of a pioneer family of that local- 
ity, and the daughter of Isaac Colburn, a me- 
chanic, who was twice married, and who reared 
fifteen children. Of the three children born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Everett, Elizabeth D., Mrs. 
Fisher, is the only survivor. Mrs. Everett 
lived a widow many years, always making her 



home with Mrs. P'isher, dying here at the ven- 
erable age of ninety-six. Her twin sister, 
Mrs. Sally Cole, it may be mentioned, lived 
to be ninety-three years old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fisher became the parents of 
two sons, Edward P^verett and P'rank Amory, 
botli of whom died in childhood. In 1891 
Mr. and Mrs. P"isher celebrated the golden 
anniversary of their marriage, the occasion 
being a very happy one to the numerous 
friends who participated in the festivities. 
The comely and convenient dwelling now oc- 
cupied by Mrs. Fisher was built by her hus- 
band in 1846, and has well withstood the 
winds and weather for fifty years. Other 
buildings on the place are comparatively new, 
having been constructed shortly after the fire 
of 1 891, by which Mr. Fisher lost his barns, 
grain store, carriages, and six horses. Mrs. 
Fisher is a woman of superior intelligence, of 
a kind and generous disposition, doing much 
to relieve the wants of the poor, and is held 
in high respect by all who have the pleasure 
of her acquaintance. 



T^HARLES \V. LINCOLN, the popular 
I Vr^ and efficient Postmaster of Holbrook, 
^U^^ was born here, December 31, 1849, 
son of Ephraim and Lucy A. 
(French) Lincoln. Both parents are also na- 
tives of Plolbrook, and still reside here. The 
father, who is one of the most prosperous men 
of the town, was formerly the Postmaster, and 
filled the position with credit to himself and 
to the full satisfaction of the townspeople. 

Charles W. Lincoln obtained his early edu- 
cation in the common schools, finishing at the 
high school of Holbrook, which was then 
known as East Randolph. Upon reaching his 
majority, he engaged in the manufacture of 
boots and shoes. After spending several 
years as the sole proprietor of a shop, he 
formed a partnership with N. P. Sprague, 
with whom, under the firm name of Lincoln & 
Sprague, the business was continued for a 
number of years. Then Mr. Lincoln retired 
from the firm in order to become a salesman 
for a produce concern doing business in Bos- 
ton. He had been in this position for two 
years, when, in 1885, he was appointed Post- 



66 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



master at Holbrook. The satisfaction he has 
given as Postmaster is evidenced by the fact 
that he has held the position under the suc- 
ceeding administrations, and that he is more 
popular to-day than he has ever been. In pol- 
itics Mr. Lincoln is a Republican, and he has 
served as a Registrar of Votes. 

Mr. Lincoln is a member of the Masonic 
order at Randolph. Me married Marietta H. 
Wilde, of Holbrook, daughter of the late 
L. F. Wilde, who was a shoe manufacturer of 
East Randolph, now Holbrook. .Mr. and 
Mrs. Lincoln have two children — Walter W. 
and Henry F. 




HOMAS McDonnell, the senior 
member of the firm of McDonnell & 
Cook, who execute cemetery and monu- 
mental work of all kinds at South Quincy, was 
born P'ebruary 8, 185 1, in Athlone, County 
Roscommon, Ireland, which was also the 
birthplace of his parents, Patrick and Bridget 
(Cunniff) McDonnell. The father was en- 
gaged in farming in his native county until 
1873, when he emigrated to America. He lo- 
cated in Quincy, Mass., where he has since 
lived retired from active pursuits. With his 
wife, Bridget, who was a daughter of John 
Cunniff, of the County Roscommon, he reared 
a family of nine children, namely: Mary, who 
is the wife of Hugh Whoriskey, of Cambridge, 
Mass.; John A., of Quincy; Timothy, de- 
ceased; Thomas, the subject of this sketch; 
the Rev. Matthew F. McDonnell, of whom 
there is no special record; Rose A., who mar- 
ried James F. Kelley, of the firm of McDon- 
nell & Kelley, of Quincy; Patrick and Mar- 
garet, both deceased ; and Theresa, a school 
teacher in West Quincy. 

Thomas McDonnell was educated in the na- 
tional schools of Athlone, Ireland. After- 
ward he assisted in the labors of the home 
farm until 1871, when, with the purpose of 
bettering his condition, he came to the United 
States. Taking up his residence in Quincy, 
he here learned the stone-cutter's trade. 
After following that calling for four years, he 
formed a partnership with his brothers John 
and Timothy, under the firm name of McDon- 
nell Brothers, continuing with them until 



1878, when he sold his interest to the other 
members of the firm. Entering then into 
company with his present partner, Martin H. 
Cook, under the name by which the firm has 
since been known, he has carried on a thriv- 
ing trade in monuments and general cemetery 
work, employing about twenty-five men. He 
is also a director of the Blue Hill Granite 
Company. 

Mr. McDonnell was married June 11, 1879, 
to Miss Mary A., daughter of Thomas Dolan, 
of this city. They have had nine children, 
of whom six are living. These are: Mary E., 
Matthew F., Thomas C, John J., Lauretta, 
and Emily. Mr. McDonnell is a member of 
Monticello Lodge, A. O. U. W., of Charles- 
town, Mass. ; of the Workmen's Benefit Asso- 
ciation; of the Royal Arcanum, John Adams 
Council, No. 12 10, of Wollaston. 




FNRY VAN NESS, an industrious 
fruit grower of Medway, was born in 
Caldwell, N.J., February 25, 1833, 
son of Peter and Sally Ann (Van 
Houton) Van Ness. The grandfather, Henry 
I. Van Ness, was a native of Caldwell. Peter 
Van Ness, also a native of Caldwell, was a 
shoemaker, and followed that trade and farm- 
ing in his native town throughout his active 
period. His wife, who was born in Orange, 
N.J., died in 1863. She was the mother of 
nine children, as follows: Henry, the subject 
of this sketch ; Hettie, who resides in Caroline 
County, Virginia, and is the widow of Peter 
Ryerson ; Martha Jane, who is no longer living; 
Harriet, who married Ezra Bush, of Caldwell, 
and died leaving two children — P'red and Ida; 
Phoebe, who married the Rev. Henry Steel - 
man, and resides at the homestead in Cald- 
well; Josephine, the wife of James Wardell, 
a machinist of Newark, N.J. ; Charlotte, the 
wife of Samuel Wardwell, a cigar-maker in 
Caldwell; James A., who married Carrie 
Tompkins, and resides in Newark; and Ed- 
ward, who is no longer living. 

Henry Van Ness was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native town. At the age 
of twenty-one he engaged in the cigar busi- 
ness in Lynnfield, Mass. Three years later 
he established himself in a general merchan- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



67 



dise business, which he subsequently carried 
on for seventeen years. He was also con- 
nected with the wholesale woodenware busi- 
ness in Worcester, Mass., for a time; and he 
was the proprietor of a general store in Ash- 
burnham, Mass., until 1876, when he came to 
Medway, and bought his present farm, lie 
now owns about forty-five acres, which he has 
brought to a high state of cultivation, and de- 
votes to general farming, dairying, garden- 
ing, and fruit-growing. 

Mr. Van Ness married for his first wife 
Sarah E. Norwood, of Lynnfield, who died in 
1874. She was a daughter of the late James 
and Betsey Norwood. In October, 1875, Mr. 
Van Ness was again married to Sarah S. 
Brooks, who was born in Ashburnham, May 
30, 1830, daughter of Elijah and Rebecca 
(Sanderson) Brooks. Elijah Brooks was a 
prosperous farmer of Ashburnham, his native 
town; and his wife was born in Littleton, 
Mass. Both are now deceased. The children 
of Mr. Van Ness by his first union were: 
Nellie, now the wife of Frank \V. Whiting, 
of Southboro, Mass.; Charles H., a conductor 
by occupation, who married Gertrude Morse, 
and resides in Somerville, Mass. ; Emma E., 
the wife of Frank W. Reynolds, a cream 
dealer in Albany, N.Y.; Susie S. who mar- 
ried Earl A. Adams, a machinist, and resides 
in Norwood, R.I. ; and Ernest, who died 
young. 

Politically, Mr. Van Ness is a Republican; 
and, though not an office-seeker, he takes a 
deep interest in public affairs. He is widely 
and favorably known as an industrious farmer 
and a worthy, upright citizen, and is highly 
esteemed by the entire community in which 
he lives. Mr. and Mrs. Van Ness are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. 




'ON. WILLIAM NEWCOMB EATON 
was born December 29, 1845, in 
|l9 1 Quincy, where he is now a leading 

ice dealer. His grandparents, John 
and Dorothy (Fox) Eaton, were lifelong resi- 
dents of Meredith, N.H. 

Jacob F. Eaton, father of William N., born 
in Meredith, N.H., in 1814, there attended 
school until he reached the age of fourteen 



years. Starting then in life on his own ac- 
count with but a dollar and a half in his 
pockets, he went to Boston in search of em- 
ployment. Here he met a man who offered 
him one hundred and twenty dollars a year to 
work on his farm. This proposal he accepted 
gladly; and at the end of twelve months he 
went home, taking to his mother one hundred 
dollars. Afterward for several years he con- 
tinued as a farm hand, each season prudently 
saving a large proportion of his earnings. 
Subsequently he hired Mount Wollaston farm, 
and conducted it for thirteen years, raising 
considerable produce for the market, establish- 
ing a successful milk business, and employing 
about ten men to assist him in his labors. 
He then purchased the farm now owned and 
occupied by his son, William N. Having, 
while in Boston, become somewhat familiar 
with the ice business as the driver of a team 
for a dealer in that commodity, he now deter- 
mined to establish a like industry in this 
town. For this purpose he fiooded about 
twelve acres of his forty-acre farm, making an 
artificial pond. In the course of time he suc- 
ceeded in building up a flourishing trade in 
ice, and was for many years the only dealer in 
Quincy and in that part of Milton through 
which his route extended. He was a strong 
advocate of the principles of the Democratic 
party, and for a number of years served as 
Selectman. He was a Mason of Rural Lodge 
in Quincy, and belonged to St. Stephen's 
Chapter and to the Boston Consistory. He 
married Ann Jerusha, daughter of William 
Nevvcomb, of this town; and they had seven 
children. Of these six grew to maturity, 
namely: Lucy Annie, now the widow of 
Charles F. Pierce, late of Quincy; Edward J., 
of Milton; William Newcomb, the subject 
of this sketch; Emma Jerusha, the wife of 
Walter L. Wellington, of Cambridge, Mass.; 
'Henry Warren, of Boston; and Carrie New- 
comb, the wife of Eugene H. Sprague, of 
Wollaston. Both parents were members of 
the Adams Temple Unitarian Church. The 
father's death occurred in 1871. 

William N. Eaton was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Quincy. For about two years 
after leaving school, he was employed in a 
wholesale flour house in Boston. Returning 



68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



then to Quincy, he embarked in the milk busi- 
ness on his own account, and in time acquired 
a profitable patronage. Since the death of his 
father, having sold his milk route, he has de- 
voted himself to the ice business, in which he 
is meeting with a deserved success, being the 
principal dealer in this city and in a portion 
of Milton. He iiandles eight thousand tons 
of ice annually, anil in the summer season em- 
ploys fifteen men, together with six double 
and two single teams; while on his farm he 
cuts from fifty to sixty tons of hay each year. 

In politics Mr. Eaton is an unswerving 
Democrat, and he has rendered his native 
town efificient service in v:irious official posi- 
tions. For seven years he was .Selectman and 
Paymaster of Quincy. In 1883 and 1884 he 
was a Representative to the lower branch of 
the State legislature, serving during both 
terms on the Insurance and Prisons Commit- 
tees. In 1 89 1 and 1892 he was Senator for 
the First Norfolk District; and while in that 
body was on the Public Works Committee. 
He was made a Mason in Rural Lodge, 
Quincy, of which he is now Past Master. 
He is also a member of St. Stephen's Chapter 
of the -South Shore Commandery; of the Jo- 
seph Cerneau Consistory of Boston ; and of the 
Granite City Club. On December 29, 1869, 
he married Mar}' Francesca, daughter of 
Flisha and Lucy (Newcomb) Packard, of 
Quincy. (An account of Mrs. Eaton's pater- 
nal ancestors may be found in the biography 
of her uncle. Colonel A. B. Packard.) Mr. 
and Mrs. Eaton have five children — Minnie 
Francesca, Lula, Annie Jerusha, Edith Eliza- 
beth, and Grace. Lula is now the wife of 
Arthur Hall Doble, of whose father, Enoch 
Hall Doble, a biography is given elsewhere in 
this work. 



-^ENJAMIN JOHNSON, of Quincy, 
who deals extensively in lumber, was 
born April 11, 1823, in St. Albans,. 
Me., son of Charles Johnson. 
Charles Johnson, who was born, bred, and ed- 
ucated in Jackson, Me., was afterward engaged 
in the lumber business in Orono, and built 
some of the first mills erected on the Penob- 
scot River, being at the time one of the 



most prominent lumber men in that section of 
the State. In 1837, when about to return 
from Galveston, Tex., then Mexican territory, 
to which he had gone with shipments of lum- 
ber, he was murdered. He was a man of su- 
peri(n- business qualifications and a strong 
member of the old Whig party. He married 
Elizabeth Wiggins, a daughter of Asa Wig- 
gins, of St. Albans, and with her reared five 
children. These were: Benjamin, the subject 
of this sketch; Augusta Scott, deceased; Le 
Baron H., of Fort Wrangel, Alaska; Mel- 
ville, of Macwahoc plantation, Aroostook 
County, Me. ; and Mary Ann. Both parents 
attended the Congregational church. 

At the age of fourteen Benjamin Johnson 
ceased to attend the public schools, and on 
account of the death of his father assumed the 
responsibility of providing for the family, he 
being the eldest child. He went to work at 
lumbering, being principally employed on the 
river, and remaining in a subordinate position 
until he had become familiar with that branch 
of industry. In 1848 he embarked in enter- 
prises on his own account, buying large tracts 
of standing timber, and converting it into 
lumber in mills hired for the purpose. He 
formed a partnership with Mr. Palmer, becom- 
ing junior member of the firm thus estab- 
lished; and for many years Palmer & Johnson 
cut from twenty to thirty million feet of lum- 
ber annually, employing sometimes more than 
three hundred men. On the 1st of May, 
1879, he came to Quincy, and bought the 
lumber-yard of a man who had been one of his 
best customers in the preceding seven years. 
Here he has since carried on a very prosper- 
ous business, handling between four and five 
million feet of lumber each year. On his 
wharf is a finish-mill, from which all kinds of 
dressed lumber are sold to both the wholesale 
and retail trade. 

Mr. Johnson married Maria, daughter of 
Samuel J. Foster, of Weston, Aroostook 
County, Me. The latter was born in Tops- 
ham, Me., April 21, 1809, and there grew to 
manhood. Following the lumber business on 
a large scale, he kept sixty oxen at work in 
the woods during the winter season, and had 
four or five six-horse teams constantly em- 
ployed. He was also an extensive stock-raiser, 




BENJAMIN JOHNSON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



7« 



having the largest farm of the kind in Maine, 
and keeping from eighty to one hundred horses 
and colts. In politics he was a prominent 
Whig, and, having served on Governor Kent's 
staff, was afterward known by all as Colonel 
Foster. He married Julia A. Brown, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Brown, of Vassalboro, Me., 
who at one time was the president of a bank 
in Hallowell, and was considered the richest 
man in the State. He was descended from 
one of two brothers, I^hilip and William Mc- 
Clellan, who came from Scotland to Portland, 
Me., at an early day. The entire history of 
this family is preserved in "Good Old Times,'" 
written by Elijah Kellogg. 

Of Mr. Johnson's three children two are liv- 
ing. These are: Lillian M., the wife of 
Frank K. Damon, of Ouincy; and Ik-njamin 
Johnson, Jr. The latter was elected Ijy the 
Republican party to the City Council in 1S96, 
and is serving on the P'inance and Legis- 
lation Committees. He is engaged in the 
lumber business with his father, with which 
he has been familiar from his youth. An es- 
teemed Odd Fellow, he belongs to Mount 
WoUaston Lodge of Ouincy and to Manet 
Encampment. He is also a member of 
Hodenesonee Tribe, Improved Order of Red 
Men, of Wollaston; of the Granite City Club; 
of the Ouincy Yacht Club, to which his father 
likewise belongs; and to the Boston Lodge of 
the Concatenated Order of Hoo Hoc, a social 
organization of lumber dealers. He married 
Sarah T. Burke, of this city, and has four 
children — Marian E., Sarah, Edith, and Ben- 
jamin (third). Mr. Johnson, Sr., belongs to 
St. Andrew's Lodge, F. & A. M., of Ban- 
gor, Me. 



UGENE SNELL, the president of the 
Holbrook Co-operative Bank of Hol- 
brook, Mass., was born in this town, 
February 7, 1847, son of Alvin and Annie B. 
(Holbrook) Snell. His paternal grandfather, 
who came from Ireland, and settled in what is 
now Brockton, had two sons. Of these, 
Alvin, born in Brockton in 1805, settled in 
1832 where his son Eugene now resides, and 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He also did 
considerable shoemaking, which was the prin- 



cipal industry of the vicinity at that time. 
His wife, Annie B., was born in East Ran- 
dolpli, now Holbrook. 

luigene Snell grew up in this town, and his 
early education was received in the common 
schools. When only fourteen years of age he 
became a regular employee in the shoe factory 
of A. C. Chandler, for whom he worked dur- 
ing the ne.\t four years. He was subsequently 
employed in different manufacturing concerns 
and finally in the well-known establishment 
of Thomas White & Co. After working for 
four years in Mr. White's shop, he became 
foreman and superintendent. He had held 
that position for twenty years when he re- 
signed in January, 1894. For five years Mr. 
Snell was vice-president of the Co-operative 
Bank. In 1894 he was elected president, 
which office he holds at the present time. 
Mr. Snell's position is one of great responsi- 
bility; and his election to it was a tribute, not 
only to his ability as a financier and an ad- 
ministrative officer, but to the integrity of 
his personal character. As vice-president he 
showed in an unusual degree his financial and 
e.xecutive ability, and it was a natural conse- 
quence that he should be chosen president. 

Mr. Snell married Olive A. Poor, of Bos- 
ton, Mass. She has been the mother of three 
children — Hattie A., Elmer A., and Annie 
L. Hattie is a teacher in one of the public 
schools of Arlington. Mr. Snell and his fam- 
ily attend the Congregational church at Hol- 
brook, and they are active in the social and 
benevolent work of the society. In politics 
Mr. Snell is a Republican. Public-spirited 
to a high degree, he is devoted to the inter- 
ests of his native town. He is a member of 
the Masonic bodies at Brockton. A well- 
informed man, Mr. Snell has clear and defi- 
nite views regarding questions of social and 
political importance. 




ANFORD P. BOWDISH, a car- 
penter and builder of Foxboro, was 
born July 21, 1817. in Burrillville, 
R.I., which was likewise the birth- 
place of his father, Asa Bowdish. The fam- 
ily in Rhode Island originated with an ances- 
tor who located in Gloucester, Providence 



72 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



County. Here David Bowdish, the grand- 
father of Sanford P., was born and bred. 
David afterward removed to Burrillville, set- 
tling in the midst of a dense forest, from 
which he reclaimed a farm. At first he lived 
in a log cabin erected by his own hands; but 
before many years he had a substantial frame 
house, in which he spent his declining days, 
passing away at the age of eighty years. He 
married Lois Pierce, and of their children 
Asa was the only son. 

Asa Bowdish inherited the parental home- 
stead, and managed it for several years. Sub- 
sequently he sold the property, that he might 
give his exclusive attention to his trade of a 
cooper. This occupation he followed in 
Wrentham, Norfolk County, foraiime. Then 
he removed to Uxbridge, where he bought 
land, and carried on mixed husbandry in con- 
nection with coopering until his demise, in 
the seventy-fifth year of his age. His wife. 
Patience, who was a daughter of Timothy 
Perry, had seven children, as follows: San- 
ford P., the subject of this biography; Lois, 
who died some time ago; Crawford, of North- 
bridge; Rachel, a resident of West Town- 
send, Mass.; Caroline, of Foxboro; Mary, 
who lives with her eldest brother; and Asa 
VV., also of this town. Having enlisted in 
1862, Asa W. served for nine months in the 
Civil VV'ar, participating with Company K, 
Forty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infan- 
try, in the engagements at Goldsboro and 
White Hall, N.C. At the expiration of his 
term he was mustered out of the service at 
Readville, Mass., and is now a comrade of the 
G. A. R. post at Canton. 

Having acquired his education in the dis- 
trict schools of Burrillville, R.I., Sanford P. 
Bowdish worked for the neighboring farmers 
by the month. After the removal of the fam- 
ily to Uxbridge he learned the carpenter's 
trade, becoming one of the most skilful work- 
men in the vicinity. This craft has been his 
regular occupation since 1844. At one time 
he was Surveyor of Wood and Lumber in Ux- 
bridge. In 1886 Mr. Bowdish purchased the 
James Daniels estate in Foxboro. Here he 
has since lived somewhat retired from active 
occupation. In i860 he was unfortunate 
enough to lose the sight of his left eye. Well 



preserved in body and mind, he looks young 
in spite of his years, and is regarded as a man 
of sterling integrity. 

Mr. Bowdish was married to I\Iiss Mary A. 
Smith, a daughter of Chauncey Smith, of 
Macedon, N.Y. She died in 1882, leaving 
no children. Mr. Bowdish has been an Odd 
Fellow since he joined the lodge of Uxbridge 
in 1847. He cast his first Presidential vote 
in 1840 for Martin Van Buren, and since the 
formation of the Republican party has been 
one of its stanchest supporters. Both he and 
his brother Asa are living witnesses of the 
strange outbreak in Rhode Island known as 
"Dorr's Rebellion." 




EMUEL W. STANDISH, the editor 
of the Stoughton Sentinel, was born 
in North Easton, Mass., December 
13, 1858, son of David B. and 
Hannah G. (Ellis) Standish. His grand- 
father, Lemuel Standish, who was a ship- 
builder of Bath, Me., was accidentally killed 
when about sixty years old. 

David B. Standish, born in Bath, was a 
resident of Stoughton during the last fifteen 
years of his life. He was an engineer on the 
Boston & Providence Railroad; and in this 
capacity he had travelled constantly between 
the two cities for thirty-seven years, when he 
retired on a pension in 1880. At his death, 
which occurred in 1880, he was the oldest en- 
gineer in point of service on the road or in 
the country. By his wife, Hannah, who is a 
native of Dedham, Mass., and is now living 
in Stoughton with a daughter, he became the 
father of seven children. These were: Al- 
bert E., now an engineer on the N.Y., N. H. 
& H. Railroad; Henry A., now a conductor 
on the same road; David H., who is a whole- 
sale dry -goods dealer in New York City; 
George E., in the dry-goods business in Bos- 
ton ; Lemuel W., the subject of this sketch; 
Ella L., who resides with her mother in 
Stoughton; and Elmer W., deceased. Albert 
married Miss Rebecca Capen, of Stoughton, 
and has four children — -Miles, Ellis, Lucy, 
and Ethel; Henry married Miss Nellie Kins- 
ley, of Stoughton, and has one child, Edward 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



73 



K. ; David married Miss Anna Ellis, of 
Stoughton ; George married Miss Jennie 
Graves, of Lynn, Mass., and has one child, 
Jennie. 

Lemuel W. Standish graduated from the 
Stoughton High School in 1876. On leaving 
school he learned the printing business, serv- 
ing an apprenticeship in Wakefield, Mass., 
and working for four years in Boston. Then, 
returning to Stoughton, he went to work in 
the Sentinel office. In 1883 he bought the 
paper, which since that time has been under 
his management. The Sentinel, which was 
established in 1861 by William A. and W. H. 
Wood, of Stoughton, under Mr. Standish's 
management has been a bright, progressive, 
and newsy weekly. In the well-equipped 
office all kinds of job printing are also done. 

Mr. Standish was married in 1885 to Nettie 
A. Briggs, of Stoughton, and has four chil- 
dren — Rose, Karl, Clement, and Walker. 
An active Republican, he has been a member 
of the Republican Town Committee as secre- 
tary for the past ten years, is now serving his 
second term on the Republican State Commit- 
tee, and is a member of that body's E.\ecutive 
Committee. He was the party candidate for 
Representative in the General Court in 1891, 
when he carried his own town in the face of 
an adverse party vote, and came within eighty 
votes of being elected in a district which 
gave four hundred Democratic majority. A 
Mason in good standing, he is Senior Warden 
of Rising Star Lodge; and he belongs to La- 
fayette Commandery, U. O. G. C. He is a 
member of the Stoughton Musical Society, 
and he has sung in the Congregational church 
choir for ten years. Mr. Standish is one of 
the leading young men of Stoughton, and has 
many friends. 



-OSEPH WARREN HAYDEN, the 
Chief of Police in Ouincy, was born 
here in December, 1841, son of George 
W. Hayden. The father, born in 
Braintree, Mass., in 18 13, grew to man's es- 
tate in his native town, and learned the trade 
of shoemaker. After his marriage he re- 
moved to Ouincy, where he followed his trade 
until his ~death in 1865, while yet in the 



prime of life. His wife, in maidenhood Eliza 
M. Whiting, who was a native of this town, 
bore him four children. These were: George 
L., who died November 29, 1896; Joseph 
Warren, the subject of this sketch; Albert 
A. and William A., both of Braintree, this 
county. Both parents were members of the 
Congregational Church of Ouincy. 

Joseph Warren Hayden was educated in the 
common schools of Ouincy. When old 
enough to select an occupation, he chose that 
of stone-cutter, and thereupon began learning 
the trade. While the late Civil War was in 
progress, he ran away from his employer to 
enlist in the service of the Union. Joining 
Company M, First Massachusetts Heavy Ar- 
tillery, he was sent to Washington, D.C., 
where he remained on guard for two years. 
He was then sent with his regiment to the 
Army of the Potomac, and on June 22, 1864, 
was taken prisoner in front of Petersburg. 
He was held by the Confederates for more 
than si.\ months, during which lime he was an 
unwilling visitor at Libby Prison, Belle Isle, 
Salisbury, Andersonville, Savannah, Flor- 
ence, Mellen, Charleston, and St. John's Col- 
lege Hospital. He was discharged from the 
hospital, July 2, 1865, a mere anatomy, hav- 
ing been reduced in weight while in Southern 
prisons from one hundred and ninety-nine 
pounds to ninety -si.x pounds. After his re- 
turn home, when his health permitted, Mr. 
Hayden resumed his trade, and followed it for 
a number of years. He was then appointed 
Inspector by the Board of Health, a position 
which he held for si.x or seven years. Then 
he became a permanent patrolman on the po- 
lice force. Two years later, in 1893, he was 
appointed Chief of Police, a capacity in which 
he has since served most satisfactorily to the 
city and with credit to himself. 

For several years Chief Hayden was cap- 
tain of the old "Tiger Fire Company," and he 
was engineer of the fire department for five 
years. He is a member of Mount Wollaston 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; of Delphi Lodge, K. of 
P., of Weymouth; of Philedian Senate, 
K. A. E. O. ; and of Paul Revere Post, 
G. A. R. In November, 1 866, he married 
Miss Lavina H. Thayer, a daughter of John 
H. Thayer, of Braintree, Mass. 



u 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



OSEPH DYER, a leading business man 
of South Weymouth, president of the 
South Weymouth Savings Bank, and 
formerly a member of the Massachu- 
setts legislature, was born in this town, No- 
vember 9, 1830, son of Joseph and Betsey 
(White) Dyer. His parents were both na- 
tives of Weymouth; and his grandfather, John 
Dyer, was in his day one of its wealthy and 
prominent citizens. The family has long 
been a reputable one in this locality. 

Joseph Dyer grew to manhood in his native 
town, and acquired a common-school educa- 
tion. At the age of twenty-one he engaged 
in stamping and gilding boots, a business 
which he followed successfully for fifteen 
years. In 1866 he established himself in the 
grocery business in Independence Square, 
where he has since continued to maintain a 
large patronage. He was one of the organ- 
izers of the -South Weymouth Savings Bank, 
of which he is now president and a trustee; 
and he is a director of the First National 
Bank, of which also he was an incorporator. 
He is a member of the Weymouth Grocers' 
Association, and as a live business man is ac- 
tively interested in the prosperity of the town. 
In politics a Republican, he was elected to 
the legislature in 1873; and for a number of 
years he served the town as Auditor. 

Mr. Dyer has been twice married. The 
maiden name of his first wife was Caroline 
Blackinton. His present wife, who was in 
maidenhood Florence Deane, is a native of 
.South Weymouth. Mr. Dyer is widely and 
favorably known among the business men of 
this section, and possesses the esteem and con- 
fidence of his fellow-townsmen. 




LIVER CAPEN, born in Dedham, 
October 14, 1804, son of Nathaniel 
and Submit (Bullard) Capen, was 
prominent in business circles, both in 
Dedham and Boston, and is well remembered 
by the older residents of Dedham. His first 
American ancestor, who came from England, 
was an early settler in Dorchester, Mass. 
Nathaniel Capcn, born in Sharon, Mass., 
spent his last years in Dedham. His first 
marriage was contracted with Submit Bullard, 



the mother of Oliver Capen. For his second 
wife he married Olive, a sister of his first 
wife. 

Oliver Capen at first engaged in farming. 
.Shortly after he embarked in a mercantile 
business here in Dedham. When the Read- 
ville branch railroad was extended to Dedham, 
he took the road on a lease, and was for some 
time its sole manager. He subsequently 
went into the wood and coal business at Pack- 
ard's Wharf, Boston, afterward adding the 
sale of brick, lime, and cement. For several 
years after his marriage he occupied his 
father's old homestead on Westfield Street, 
Dedham. Later he removed to the Whiting 
homestead on High Street, where he after- 
ward lived. 

Mr. Capen married Sarah Ann Whiting, 
who was born in Dedham, daughter of Calvin 
and Pllizabeth (Fuller) Whiting. Her 
grandfather, Isaac Whiting, was a farmer and 
large land-owner here, and influential in town 
affairs. Calvin Whiting, who was a man of 
much inventive genius, was engaged in the 
cotton manufacturing business for a time, but 
was better known as a manufacturer of tin- 
ware. His inventive ability served him well 
in both these lines, for use in which he 
invented and improved numerous pieces of 
machinery. Soon after his marriage he built 
the house now occupied by his grandchildren, 
the son and daughter of Oliver and Sarah Ann 
Capen, and where his last days were spent. 
Mrs. Whiting was born in Dedham, daughter 
of Hezekiah and Anna (Draper) Fuller. Mr. 
Capen died October 23, 1865, and his wife 
on March 27, 1888. A son and daughter 
survive them — Calvin Whiting Capen and 
Elizabeth Fuller Capen. The son, who was 
in business for some years, of late has lived 
retired, only looking after his private inter- 
ests. The daughter received a high-school 
education. Since the death of her mother she 
has resided with her brotber. 



ENRY WHITE, turnkey at the Nor- 
folk County jail and house of cor- 
rection, located in Dedham, Mass., 
has held this position since 1859, 
making a service, with the exception of a brief 











JOSEPH DYER. 



BiOGRAi'iiicAi. ki<:vip:vv 



77 



term of absence in war time, of nearly four 
decades. He was born April 20, 1824, in the 
neighboring town of Weymouth, where his 
great-grandfather White liad settled early in 
life, and where his father, George W. White, 
and his grandfather, whose name was Jona- 
than, were both born and reared. Jonathan 
White was engaged in agricultural pursuits in 
Weymouth, and also worked at the shoe- 
maker's trade more or less during his long 
life of eighty years. 

George W. White was a noted musician in 
his day, and for some years in addition to his 
other labors he kept a livery stable in Wey- 
mouth. He was progressive in his views, 
highly respected for his intelligence and in- 
tegrity. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Betsey Burrell, was a native of Weymouth, 
being one of a large family of children born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Burrell. Her 
father, who lived to the age of fourscore years, 
was a shoemaker and farmer throughout his 
active life. Mrs. Betsey B. White bore her 
husband twelve children, all of whom grew to 
mature years, the following being yet alive, 
namely: Elizabeth, a teacher in San F"ran- 
cisco, Cal. ; George W. , Deputy Sheriff of 
Norfolk County; William; Henry, the spe- 
cial subject of this brief biographical record; 
Francis E. ; and Melvina, who married 
Francis Bush. The mother, who was con- 
nected with the Orthodo.x church, died at the 
age of seventy-three years. 

Henry White grew to man's estate on the 
home farm, attending the district schools in 
his boyhood and youth, and learning the shoe- 
maker's trade from his father. On attaining 
his majority, he embarked in business for him- 
self, engaging in the manufacture of shoes at 
Weymouth I.anding, where he continued until 
his appointment to his present office in 1859. 
In this position Mr. White has served most 
faithfully and satisfactorily, discharging his 
official duties in a manner worthy of the 
highest commendation, and has the entire con- 
fidence and respect of those above and below 
him. The number of prisoners under his 
charge averages about ninety, although it has 
at times been as high as one hundred and 
fifty, but not often. In 1862 Mr. White, 
shortly after the hanging of Hersey at the 



jail, left his position in order to serve in de- 
fence of his country, enlisting from Wey- 
mouth in Company A, Forty-second Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry, in which he 
served nine months, being with General 
Banks's expedition at various points along 
the coast. At the expiration of his term of 
enlistment he returned to Dedham, and re- 
sumed his duties as turnkey. 

Mr. White was married in May, 1849, to 
Miss Mary Wales, who was born in Weymouth, 
a daughter of Asa B. Wales, for forty years a 
well-known and popular tavern-keeper of that 
town. Mr. and Mrs. White reared one child, 
a son, Frank W., who is in the insurance 
business in Boston. He married Delia Star- 
rett, and has two children — Winnifred and 
Starrett. Mrs. White passed to the life be- 
yond in May, 1893, aged sixty-two years. 
She was a woman of great strength and purity 
of character, highly esteemed by all who knew 
her, and a regular attendant of the Univer.sal- 
ist church, as is Mr. White. He is a stead- 
fast Republican in his political affiliations, 
and, fraternally, belongs to Constellation 
Lodge, F. & A. M., which he joined soon 
after its orrranization. 



ORING G. LITTLEFIELD, a shoe 
manufacturer of Avon, is a native of 

Randolph, born October 24, 1848. 

He is a son of Aaron and Emily 
(Wales) Littlefield. The father is a native of 
the Pine Tree State: and the mother was born 
in Randolph, Mass. They had a family of 
fourteen children, of whom Loring G. was 
the seventh child. He acquired his primary 
education in the public schools of East 
Stoughton, to which place his parents moved 
when he was three years old. Subsequently 
he attended school for one term in Middle- 
boro, Mass. When about fourteen years of 
age he went to work in the boot manufactory 
of E. Tucker & Co. in East Stoughton (now 
Avon), where for a short time he was em- 
ployed in the stitching department. After- 
ward for a number of years he worked in the 
stitching department of E. W. & G. W. 
Littlefield's factory. Entering into partner- 
ship with E. W. and G. F.^ Littlefield in 



78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1872, he was engaged in the manufacture of 
boots and shoes at East Stoughton, under the 
firm name of E. W. Littlefield & Co., for 
four years. Then for six years Mr. Little- 
field was in the livery business in East 
Stoughton, and bought and sold all kinds of 
live stock. During the ensuing five years he 
was associated with G. F. Littlefield in the 
manufacture of boots and shoes in East 
Stoughton and Brockton, the firm being G. F. 
& L. G. Littlefield. Since 1888 he has man- 
aged an independent business, manufacturing 
a medium grade of men's, boys', and youth's 
shoes. He has erected a large plant, and 
when business is good employs about one hun- 
dred and eighty hands. 

Li 1882 he was married to Miss Celia 
Lynch, of F]ast Stoughton, and has a promis- 
ing family of five children — Loring, George 
h1, Frank W., Annie G., and Celia V. Mr. 
Littlefield, who is a Republican, served for 
three years as Selectman of Avon. He is ac- 
tively interested in local politics. 




:ECHARIAH L. BICKNELL, an ex- 
Representative to the General Court 
from Weymouth, and the president of 
the East Weymouth Savings Bank, 
was born in Weymouth, June 28, 1820, son of 
Lovell and Rebecca (Dyer) Bicknell, who 
were also natives of Weymouth. The family 
is an old and honored one in the town. Its 
first representative came here about the year 
1635. Mr. Bicknell's maternal grandfather, 
Asa Dyer, v;as a soldier of the Revolution. 
His paternal grandfather was Zechariah. 
Lovell Bicknell, the father, was a stanch 
Democrat, and for a time the Town Treasurer 
of Weymouth. In his youth he was a sea- 
man. Later he was employed by the govern- 
ment in building stone piers and walls, and 
did considerable work of that kind at New- 
port, R.I. He kept his residence in Wey- 
mouth, and died in 1872. Of his children, 
Zechariah L. is the only survivor. 

Zechariah L. Bicknell received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Weymouth and 
in a private academy at Hingham. When 
about seventeen years of age he began to 
learn the carpenter's trade in Boston. Hav- 



ing served an apprenticeship of four years, 
he worked as a journeyman for some time. In 
1850 he engaged as clerk in a store of East 
Weymouth; and in 1865 he started a general 
merchandise business for himself, and con- 
ducted it afterward for fifteen years. He sub- 
sequently became an insurance broker, which 
business he still carries on, representing the 
Hingham Mutual Fire Insurance Company in 
Weymouth. One of the organizers of the 
East Weymouth Savings Bank, he is now a 
member of its Board of Trustees and its presi- 
dent. He was a Representative to General 
Court for the sessions of 1856, 1857, and 
1 89 1. P"or fifteen years he served as Select- 
man of Weymouth, being for much of the 
time chairman of the board. He was a mem- 
ber of what has since been known as the War 
Board. He has also been a member of the 
Board of Assessors. In jjolitics he is a Dem- 
ocrat. 

Mr. Bicknell married Abbie L. Perry, who 
bore him three children. These were: Mary 
L. , now deceased, who was the wife of George 
Miles, of Weymouth; Ruth L., the wife of 
Charles Harrington, of Weymouth ; and Ma- 
rinda, the wife of Samuel C. Denton. Mr. 
Bicknell's present wife was previously Mrs. 
Sarah C. Barker, the widow of the late Warren 
W. Barker, of Marshfield. Mr. Bicknell is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and one of the trustees of the society. He is 
also a member of Orphans' Hope Lodge, F. & 
A. M., of 'East Weymouth, and was the first 
Master after the return of its charter. He be- 
longs to Crescent Lodge of the I. O. O. F. 
of East Weymouth, is one of its trustees, and 
takes an active interest in its welfare. He 
has done considerable business in settling es- 
tates, having been administrator in a number 
of instances. He has also been a Justice of 
the Peace. A self-made man of high integ- 
rity and sterling character, he has the respect 
of his townsmen. 



UGUSTUS L. CHASE, M.D., of 
Randolph, physician and surgeon, was 
born in Somerset, Vt., March 9, 
1849. A son of Abraham and 
Catherine (Reed) Chase, he comes of an old 




^ 




ZECHARIAH L. BICKNKLL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



8i 



New England family. Three brothers, 
Thomas, William, and Aquila Chase, came 
to this country from England some time after 
the arrival of the "Mayflower," and settled in 
New England. Dr. Chase is a descendant in 
the seventh generation from Aquila. His 
great-great-grandfather Chase was a Revolu- 
tionary soldier. Abraham Chase was a farmer 
and a native and lifelong resident of Whiting- 
ham, Vt. His wife also was of Elnglish de- 
scent and a native of Whitingham. Her 
father, Calvin Reed, was a soldier in the War 
of 1 812. 

Augustus T-. Chase was reared on his 
futher's farm in Whitingham, and attended 
the public schools of that town, including the 
high school. When he was twenty years of 
age he began to study medicine with Dr. C. 
Edwin Miles, of Boston, under whose direc- 
tion mainly he studied three years, in the 
meanwhile taking the regular course of lect- 
ures at the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. Having graduated from this 
institution on February 7, 1872, in the 
month of March following he entered upon 
his profession in Randolph, which has been 
his field of labor ever since. He worked hard 
to qualify himself for his calling, and earned 
money by teaching school in Whitingham dur- 
ing the winter season. Dr. Chase has a large 
general practice, and is highly esteemed by 
his fellows. An editorial in the Massac/at- 
sctts Medical Joiiriial oi August, 1894, says he 
"is painstaking in his methods; bases his 
views and efforts only upon the most careful 
investigations; and, his conclusions once 
formed, is prompt to act, firm in his convic- 
tions, and fearless in the discharge of duty." 
He was the recording secretary of the Massa- 
chusetts Eclectic Medical Society for years, 
and was the president in 1885, doing much to 
promote the growth and prosperity of the 
organization. He is a member of the Boston 
District Eclectic Medical Society and the Bos- 
ton Eclectic Gynaecological and Obstetrical 
Society. In 1894 he was appointed a member 
of the Massachusetts State Board of Registra- 
tion in Medicine for six years; and from Au- 
gust, 1891, to September, 1893, during Presi- 
dent Harrison's administration, he was a 
member of the Pension Examining Board of 



Brockton. His practice includes his duties 
as the medical examiner for a number of fra- 
ternal organizations and insurance companies. 
In 1873 Dr. Chase was married to Mary L. , 
daughter of Ephraiin Mann, of Randolph, 
Mass. His children are: Ella L. , a graduate 
of the department of liberal arts in Boston 
University; Herbert M., a student at Harvard 
College; and Oilman L., a graduate of the 
Randolph High School. Dr. Chase has 
served as chairman of the Randolph Republi- 
can Committee, and he takes an active inter- 
est in the welfare of his party and the prog- 
ress of his town. He is a member of the 
New England Order of Protection; of the 
Knights of Honor; of Rising Star Lodge, No. 
76, I. O. O. E. , of Randolph; and of Golden 
Star Lodge, No. 6g, Daughters of Rebecca, of 
the same place. 




HARLES HENRY BELCHER, a 
, retired merchant of Holbrook, is a 
Is , native of East Randolph (now Hol- 
brook), born June 4, 1830. His 
parents were Jeremiah and Hannah (Brooks) 
Belcher. The father also, who was a farmer, 
was a native of East Randolph. The mother 
was born in Hanover, Mass. 

The subject of this sketch was reared on a 
farm in East Randolph, and educated in the 
public schools of this town. When about six- 
teen years of age he began to work at shoe- 
making, and when he became of age he en- 
gaged in the shoe business on his own account 
in East Randolph. His business prospered, 
and in course of time he adiled the manufact- 
ure of boots. He had a large factory, and 
did a prosperous business, employing from 
forty to fifty hands. In 1883 his factory was 
burned, and he did not attempt to rebuild. 
He subsequently opened a general store in 
Holbrook, which he conducted luitil 1894, 
when he retired. 

Mr. Belcher has been twice married. His 
first wife, who was before marriage Miss Eliz- 
abeth A. Gurney, of Abington, Mass., died 
March 16, 1867, leaving one daughter, Clara 
F., who is now the wife of J. Elliott Chand- 
ler, of Brockton, Mass. The present .Mrs. 
Belcher was in maidenhood Miss Eliza J. 



82 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Thayer, daughter of Otis Thayer (now de- 
ceased), of Holbrook. By her also he has one 
living daughter, Fannie E., wife of Lester 
S. Holbrook, of Holbrook, Mass. Mr. 
Belcher is a Republican, politically. He 
was on the Holbrook Board of Selectmen for 
a number of years. He is a public-spirited 
citizen, in favor of all projects for the ad- 
vancement of the town, and has aided materi- 
ally in improving it. Belcher Street is 
named in his honor. Mr. Belcher is Assistant 
Dictator of the Knights of Honor of Holbrook. 
He is a member of the Winthrop Congrega- 
tional Church. A well-known citizen, he has 
the confidence of his townsmen, and is univer- 
sally respected. He has a pleasant home at 
the corner of IMymouth and Weymouth 
Streets. 




iRS. LOUISA MARSH, of Ded- 
ham, the widow of the late George 
Marsh, is a native of this town 
and a daughter of Ezra W. and 
Lendamine (Guild) Taft. Her paternal 
grandfather, Frederick Taft, who was a life- 
long resident of U.tbridge, Mass., and was for 
many years prominently identified with the 
public affairs of that town, died at the age of 
eighty. Ezra W. Taft was a native of L^x- 
bridge. He settled in Dedhani, and became 
one of the best known cotton manufacturers of 
this locality in his day. He built a cotton- 
mill in Readville, and carried it on for some 
years. He then constructed the dam at East 
Uedham ; and, erecting a large stone cotton 
factory, he continued to manufacture goods ex- 
tensively until his retirement from business, 
which took place in 1861. He was prominent 
in financial circles and the president of the 
Dedhain National Bank. In politics he acted 
with the Republican party. He was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen for many years, 
and a Representative in the State legislature 
for four terms. At his death he was eighty- 
four years old. His wife, Lendamine, was 
born in Dedham. Her father, Calvin Guild, 
descended from one of the earliest settlers in 
this town. She died October 24, 1897, aged 
ninety-four years. Of the si.\ children reared 
by her, five are living, namely: Josephus, 



who resides in Boston; Cornelius, who resides 
in Dedham; Minerva, of whom there is no 
special record; Louisa, the subject of this 
sketch; and Ezra F., a resident of Cambridge, 
Mass. Both parents were united with the 
Congregational church. 

On June 19, 1869, Louisa Taft was joined 
in marriage with George Marsh. He was 
born in Dedham, June 24, 1838, son of Daniel 
Marsh. His father, who was a native of 
Hingham, Mass., learned the mason's trade in 
Dedham, and followed it during the active 
period of his life. He died here at an ad- 
vanced age. George Marsh was educated in 
the graded and high schools of this town. 
After completing his studies, he entered 
Tower's drug store as an apprentice. He re- 
mained with Mr. Tower for some time, and 
then went to Boston, where he was employed 
as a drug clerk for four years. When twenty- 
one years old he returned to Dedham, and, 
purchasing his former employer's store, he en- 
gaged in business upon his own account. For 
over thirty years he conducted one of the best 
pharmaceutical establishments in Dedham, 
and enjoyed a liberal patronage. He took a 
lively interest in all matters relative to the 
progress and improvement of the town, was 
highly esteemed for his many commendable 
qualities, and was a regular attendant of the 
Congregational church. He died December 
25, 1890, aged fifty-two years. Mrs. Marsh 
and he were the parents of three children, 
namely: Theodore T. , who resides in Ded- 
ham, and is in the insurance business in Bos- 
ton ; Alice, who is employed at the Dedham 
Public Library; and Louise, a kindergarten 
teacher in Dedham. 

Mrs. Marsh and her children are members 
of the Congregational church, and take an 
earnest interest in Sunday-school work. The 
family occupy a pleasantly located residence, 
which was built by the late Mr. Marsh in 
1870. 



HARLES WILSON, a prosperous 
granite dealer of Duincy, was born 
here, March 18, 1833, son of Will- 
iam Wilson. The father, who was 
born and bred in Cambridge, Mass., after 




BIOGRAl'llR-AL REVIKVV 



83 



learning the trade of a blacksmith, followed 
that occupation in his native town tor a few 
years. Then he removed to Oiiincy, thinking 
this town a better location for one in his busi- 
ness, and thereafter remained a resident until 
his death in 1862, at the age of seventy-six 
years. A man of much enterprise, he not 
only followed blacksmithing after coming 
here, but added materially to his income by 
his dealings in granite, for some years operat- 
ing a quarry from which he obtained a valu- 
able building stone. In politics he was an old 
Jacksonian Democrat. He married Louisa, 
daughter of Micaiah Adams, of Ouincy, and 
became the father of nine children, namely: 
George Frederick, now deceased; I'lmeline, 
who married William Parker, of this city; 
Ann, also deceased, who was the wife of Al- 
bert Thayer, of Ouincy; Francis, likewise de- 
ceased; William, now of San Francisco, Cal. ; 
Charles, the subject of this sketch; John, of 
Ouincy; Adeline, the wife of Edward Nutter, 
of South Lancaster, Mass. ; and Lydia 
Amanda, the wife of Wallace Manuel, of 
North Weymouth, Mass. In religion both 
parents were of the liberal type of believers, 
and were active members of the Universalist 
church. 

In his boyhood Charles Wilson attended the 
public schools of Ouincy. He began earning 
his living by working in a quarry. At the age 
of nineteen he embarked in business for him- 
self as a manufacturer of paving stone for the 
New Orleans and Philadelphia markets. Now 
he has what is claimed to be the most extensive 
trade in his line of any dealer of the locality. 
At the outset he employed about twenty men 
in cutting the granite, and did a good deal of 
teaming, keeping six of the largest and sleek- 
est oxen in Ouincy. Since then, on occasions 
when business was at its prime, he kept as 
many as one hundred men busy in preparing 
the paving blocks, of which he shipped from 
seventy-five to one hundred thousand in a day. 
He is likewise somewhat interested in real es- 
tate, his sales in realty being considerable. 
In politics he affiliates with the Republican 
party, but has never been an aspirant for 
official honors. 

On January i, 1872, Mr. Wilson married 
Mary B., daughter of William H. Harris, of 



East Stoughton, Mass. She passed away on 
February 26, 1897, leaving one son. Charles 
Henry. Two other children born of the union 
died at an early age. Mr. Wilson is liberal 
in his religious beliefs, and an attendant of 
the Universalist church. He is held in high 
respect as a man of good business capacity, 
upright and honorable in all his dealings, and 
a most useful citizen. 



RANCIS AMBLER, of Weymouth, an 
ex-member of the State legislature for 
Weymouth and Ouincy, and a dealer in 
flour and grain at East Braintree, was born 
here in June, 1833. He is a son of Nelson 
and Emily (Nash) Ambler, both natives of 
Weymouth. The family is an old one here, 
and is well and favorably known. Mr. 
Ambler's great-uncle on his mother's side 
was a soldier of the War of 18 12. His uncle, 
William G. Nash, though now eighty-four 
years old, is still actively engaged in the 
grocery business in Weymouth. 

When Francis was in his fourth year his 
father died; and his mother subsequently mar- 
ried Silas Binney, who for twenty years was a 
Deputy Sheriff of Norfolk County. Owing to 
an injury of a leg, received from the stroke of 
a hammer when in his fifth year, he could not 
go about much until eleven years of age, and 
in the interval received special instruction at 
home, and later attended a private school. 
When able to do so, he went to the Weymouth 
public schools, working mornings and even- 
ings in the drug store of Amos S. White at 
Weymouth. When about thirty years of age, 
having acquired a thorough knowledge of the 
drug business, he bought out Mr. White, and 
afterward conducted the store for about seven- 
teen years. Early in the eighties he joined 
A. L. Hobart in the flour and grain business, 
which, with a mill located at the head of Mo- 
natiquit River, was carried on under the name 
of Ambler & Hobart. At the end of a year 
Mr. Ambler bought out his partner's interest, 
and since then, while retaining the firm 
name, has been the sole proprietor. In the 
different departments he employs eight men, 
and he gives his personal supervision to the 
details of the business. Some time after en- 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



gaging in this business, he sold out his drug 
store to Dr. E. L. Warren. In politics he is 
a Republican, and he has taken an active part 
in the town affairs. For several years he was 
a member of the Board of Selectmen of Wey- 
mouth, and for a part of that time the clerk of 
the Board. In 1885 and 1886 he represented 
Weymouth and Quincy in the legislature, and 
was clerk of the Legislative Committee on 
Insurance. 

Mr. Ambler married Elvira C. Paty, of 
Plymouth, and has one daughter, Emma F., 
now the wife of Dr. John F. Welch, of 
Quincy. He attends the Union Congrega- 
tional Church of Weymouth and Braintree, is 
a member of the Masonic Lodge of Wey- 
mouth, and a promoter and charter member of 
the Royal Arcanum at Weymouth. He has 
been president of the South Shore Co-opera- 
tive Bank since its organization, a director of 
both the Union National Bank of Weymouth 
and the Weymouth Savings Bank, and a trus- 
tee of the Tufts Library since its incorpora- 
tion. A self-made man, Mr. Ambler is a 
good representative of those who win respect 
for themselves, a position of influence, and a 
comfortable fortune. 



/§X^ 



EORGE W. FOSTER, a leading cit- 
V '3 I 'zen of Franklin, Mass., was born in 

— ^ this town, February 20, 1841, son of 
Benjamin and Mary Ann (Cook) Foster. 
The father, who was a farmer and a boat- 
builder by occupation, was also a much re- 
spected citizen of Franklin. He had two 
children: George Thompson, who died in boy- 
hood; and George W., whose name appears at 
the head of this sketch. 

George W. Foster was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Franklin. He engaged in farm- 
ing, after his marriage settling on his present 
farm, then known as the Jabez Wright farm, 
and which contains at this time about fifty 
acres. Mr. Foster is thoroughly up-to-date 
in his methods, and has greally improved his 
property. He carries on general farming, 
and also devotes considerable attention to rais- 
ing poultry for the market. He is a Republi- 
can in politics, and takes an active interest in 
the welfare of the town, but has hitherto de- 



clined office. He was married on June 29, 
1870, to Amelia Wheldon, of Lynn, Mass. 
Mrs. F"oster's father was an awl-maker by 
trade, and her mother is now living in Attle- 
boro. Mr. and Mrs. Foster have had three 
children: Alice A., now living at home; 
Mabel, working in Boston; and Gertrude 
Louise, a bright little girl, who passed away 
at the age of four years. Although Mr. 
Foster has kept out of politics, he fulfils the 
obligations of citizenship by using his influ- 
ence in behalf of the best men and measures; 
and he and his family are highly esteemed by 
their fellow-townspeople. 




,OYAL T. MANN, a prosperous 
dairy farmer of Randolph, son of 
Alvan and Emeline R. (Mitchell) 
Mann, was born February 10, 1843, 
at the homestead where he now resifles. This 
farm was purchased by his great-grandfather, 
Joseph Man, a native of Scituate, in 1734, 
what is now the town of Randolph then being 
the South Precinct of Braintree. Its next 
occupant was Seth, son of Joseph, born in 
Scituate in 1724; and the third owner was 
John Mann, a native of Randolph, son of Seth 
and grandfather of Royal T= Mann. Joseph 
Man was a son of Thomas and grandson of 
Richard Man, emigrant, who was made a free- 
man at Scituate in January, 1644. 

Alvan Mann, son of John, was a lifelong 
resident of Randolph; and for many years he 
cultivated the farm which his son. Royal T. , 
now carries on. He married in 1836 PZmeline 
R. Mitchell, who was born in 18 14, daughter 
of Eliphalet and Hannah (Howard) Mitchell, 
of Easton, Mass. Her paternal grandfather, 
Colonel Abiel Mitchell, commissioned in 
February, 1776, rendered gallant and valu- 
able services to his country during the Revo- 
lutionary War. 

He was a son of Timothy Mitchell, of 
Bridgewater, grandson of Thomas, great- 
grandson of Jacob, and great-great-grandson of 
Experience Mitchell, one of the forefathers 
who came to Plymouth in the third ship, the 
"Ann," in 1623. Colonel Mitchell was a Se- 
lectman of Easton twenty-one years and Rep- 
resentative to the General Court twenty-two 




KOVAL T. MANX. 



BIOGRAI'HICAL REVIEW 



87 



years. He died in 1821, aged eighty-eight 
years. "His grave in the South Easton cem- 
etery," says the historian, "is annually dec- 
orated with flowers, and with the flag which 
he so gallantly defended." 

Alvan and Kmeline R. M. (Mitchell) Mann 
became the parents of five children, four of 
whom are living, namely: Dr. Augustine A. 
Mann, who served as surgeon of a Rhode 
Island Cavalry Regiment during the Civil 
War, and is now practising in Central Falls, 
R.I. ; Royal T. ; Edwin M., of Randolph; 
and Luthera H., who makes her home with 
her brother. Royal T., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Royal T. Mann received his education in 
the common schools and the Stetson High 
School, and his industrial training on his 
father's farm. He owns now the homestead 
of one hundred and twenty-five acres, which 
he has managed since 1870, and also has 
some outlying wood lots. He devotes his 
principal energy to dairy farming, and sup- 
plies a large number of regular customers 
with milk. He has served as a Selectman for 
si.x years, three years of which he was chair- 
man of the board; is now serving as a mem- 
ber of the School Board and as a trustee of the 
Stetson High School; and has acted as a Jus- 
tice of the Peace for a number of years. In 
politics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Mann is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church, and has been a Deacon since 
1878. He is one of the most able farmers 
and stirring citizens of Randolph, and his 
public services have been of much benefit to 
the community. He has been for many years 
a trustee of the Randolph Savings Bank. 




ILHRIDGE F. PORTER, the manager 
of the Weymouth Clothing Company, 
of the Braintree Clothing Company, 
and of the Granite Clothing Company of 
Quincy, is one of the most enterprising and 
progressive business men of the county. 
Born July 31, 1853, in South Braintree, 
Mass., he is a son of the late Joseph Porter. 
His grandfather, Rodolphus Porter, a carpen- 
ter bv trade, was born and reared in Middle- 



boro, Plymouth County, and there spent his 
life. 

Joseph Porter was born Ai^ril 28, 1824, in 
Holbrook, Mass., where as a boy he worked at 
the shoemaker's trade. On coming of age he 
learned butchering, and subsequently carried 
on a prosperous business in that line, running 
two carts for many years. He gave up that 
business when he was made Postmaster at the 
State-house 'in Boston, where he remained 
until his death in 1870. He was a stanch Re- 
publican and an active jiolitician, but was not 
an office-seeker. A man of broad and gener- 
ous sympathies, he was ready to share his last 
dollar with the needy. He was strictly tem- 
perate, and had the sincere respect of all with 
whom he was brought in contact. His friends 
were legion, antl he had not a known enemy in 
the world. Although not a member of any 
religious organization, he took an active in- 
terest in church affairs, and for many years 
was a member of the Congregational church 
choir, singing every Sunday when not de- 
tained at home by reason of sickness. He 
married Mary, a daughter of John Arnold, of 
.South Braintree, Mass. .She was born in that 
town in 1823, and is still living, a bright and 
most lovable woman. She attends the Con- 
gregational church. Of their four children, 
the survivors are: Ann Mary, the wife of 
Douglas A. Brooks, of South Braintree; Sarah 
L. , who married Azel R. French, a native of 
Canton, Mass., now a resident of South Brain- 
tree; and Elbridge F., the subject of this 
sketch. 

Elbridge 1*". Porter attended the public 
schools of his native town until after the 
death of his father. Going then to Boston, 
he worked in a boot and shoe store for two 
years. Subsequently he was employed in a 
gentlemen's wholesale furnishing house until 
he was of age. Familiar with the details of 
that business, he established a store of a sim- 
ilar kind in South Braintree in 1875 for his 
brother-in-law, Mr. French, and managed it 
for some years. In 1882 he opened a seconil 
store at Weymouth: and a short time later he 
established a like business in Stoughton, 
which he conducted for five years. In 1892 
he opened his present store in Quincy, under 
the name of the Granite Clothing Company. 



8S 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Here he has been as successful as any mer- 
chant in the city. 

Fraternally, Mr. Porter belongs to the 
I. O. O. F. of East Weymouth, having 
membership in the Wampatuck Encampment 
of the same place; also to the Knights of 
Honor and the Knights of Pythias of Brain- 
tree; to the (juincy Club, the Granite City 
Club, and to the Braintree Social and 
Commercial Club. He first married Ella, 
daughter of Joseph Oliver, of Avon, Mass. 
She died in early womanhood, leaving two 
children — Joseph and Herbert. His second 
marriage was contracted with Miss Louie 
Howland, of Randolph, Mass., who died leav- 
ing one child, Blanche. A third marriage 
united Mr. Porter with Miss Lizzie Nutter, 
daughter of George Nutter, of Ouincy; and 
they have one child living, Elberta Porter. 




June 2 1, 



"ON. HENRY O. FAIRBANKS, e.x- 
Mayor of Ouincy, Mass., is a native 
of Boston, where he is engaged in 
business as a flour merchant. Born 
1852, a son of Moses Fairbanks, he 
is a worthy representative of one of the oldest 
families of Norfolk County, being a lineal 
descendant of Jonathan Fairbanks, who emi- 
grated from Sowerby, in Yorkshire, England, 
arriving in Boston in 1633, and in 1636 set- 
tled at Dedham. From timbers that he 
brought with him across the ocean, it is said, 
he built the main part of the old Fairbanks 
house, a celebrated landmark, still standing, 
which has during this time, a period of two 
hundred and sixty or more years, been owned 
and occupied by some of his posterity, who 
have kept it free from mortgage or other en- 
cumbrance, it being the oldest house in New 
England with such a record. Jonathan Fair- 
banks became a man of influence in the little 
hamlet to which he brought his wife and fam- 
ily, all of whom were born in England; and, 
having been admitted as a townsman, he 
signed the covenant in 1642, and resided on 
his homestead until his death in 1688. 

Captain George Fairbanks, the son of Jona- 
than, remained in Dedham with his parents 
until 1657, when he located in that part of the 
county now called Millis. He was one of the 



original settlers and founders of the town of 
Sherborn, where he served four years as Se- 
lectman, and was chosen as one of the com- 
mittee to select a minister for the parish 
church. He was a member of the Ancient 
and Honorable Artillery Company. This 
highly esteemed citizen was accidentally 
drowned June 10, 1682. His wife, Mary 
Adams, of Dedham, whom he married October 
26, 1646, died August 11, 171 1. 

Their son, Eleazer, Sr. , through whom the 
line was continued, was born June 8, 1655. 
In 1679 he took up a home lot on Main Street, 
Sherborn. Captain Eleazer P'airbanks, son of 
Eleazer, Sr. , was born in Sherborn, October 
29, 1690, and died there September 19, 1741. 
His wife, Martha Bullard, who was born De- 
cember 25, 1712, a daughter of Captain Sam- 
uel Bullard, survived him, and a few years 
after his death married again. 

Ebenezer P"airbanks, son of Captain Eleazer 
and Martha F'airbanks, born in Sherborn, 
Mass., June i, 1734, was Lieutenant of a 
company of minute-men that promptly re- 
sponded to the alarm given on April 19, 1775, 
and at a later period served for a time as a 
private in the Revolutionary War. He was a 
farmer by occupation; and in 1783 he removed 
to Brimfield, Mass., settling in the north-east- 
ern part of the town. He was a man of sterl- 
ing qualities, eminently pious, and served for 
many years as Deacon of the church. On 
July 2, 1 76 1, he married Elizabeth Dearth, 
who was born September 24, 1743, and died 
June 15, 1 818. 

Asa Fairbanks, son of Deacon Ebenezer, 
was born March 4, 1762, in that part of the 
old town of Sherborn that is now known as 
Medway. Although but a boy when the colo- 
nies began their struggle for independence, 
he enlisted in the service of his country, and 
at the age of fourteen years aided in guarding 
the military stores around Sherborn; and two 
years later, having again joined the brave sol- 
dires, he was a ferryman during the summer 
season between Tiverton and Greenwich, R.I., 
transporting horses, men, provisions, and am- 
munition. In 1780 he re-enlisted, and was 
sent to West Point, where he was stationed on 
that day in September when Arnold attempted >' 
to betray the fortress into the hands of the 




HENRY O. FAIRBANKS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



9' 



British. On April 28, 1784, he married 
Hepzibah Adams, vvlio was Ixirn in Sherborn, 
December 8, 1761, a daughter of Captain 
Moses Adams. Very soon after their union 
he and his fair bride removed to Dublin, 
N.H., settling in the midst of the dense 
woods. For three months or more they lived 
in a rude log cabin, having neither chimney 
nor door, and did all of their cooking by the 
side of a log in the open air. Their son Asa 
was the grandfather of Henry O. Fairbanks, 
the special subject of this biographical sketch. 

Asa Fairbanks, Jr., was born in Dublin, 
N.H., March 17, 1787; and in his early days 
he assisted in the pioneer labor of clearing 
the land which his father had purchased. He 
subsequently lived for a time in Peterboro, 
N.H., going thence to the town of Hancock. 
He met with a premature death, being frozen 
while out hunting near Centre Harbor, N.H. 
His first wife, the mother of Moses Fairbanks, 
was Polly Whitcomb, a daughter of John 
VVhitcomb. She died September 24, 1838; 
and he subsequently married Mis."? Sarah Hen- 
iston. 

Moses Fairbanks, born June 19, 1816, in 
Peterboro, N.H., was reared on a farm, and 
obtained his education in the district school. 
At the age of eighteen years, deciding that he 
had no particular taste for agricultural pur- 
suits, he went to Concord, N.H., where he 
worked in a liotel for two years, and thence to 
Boston, Mass. He obtained a situation as 
clerk with the firm of Boyd & Allen, being in 
their service while they were building the 
Howard Athenceum. Subsequently entering 
into business on his own account, he was for a 
number of years at the head of the firm of 
Fairbanks & Beard, afterward being connected 
with the firm of Moses Fairbanks & Co. ; and 
he was later in business alone for five years. 
He lived nearly fourscore years, passing from 
earth on February 4, 1896. On April 27, 

1840, he married Frances Maria Moulton, who 
was born in Centre Harbor, N. H., May 23, 
1821, a daughter of Jonathan Smith .and Deb- 
orah (Nash) Moulton. Their children were 
as follows: Mary Frances, born December I, 

1841, who married April 2, 1863, Daniel B. 
Spear, of Boston ; Helen Maria, who was born 
October 16, 1845, and died April 4, 1846; 



Helen Louise, born April 3, 1847, died No- 
vember 2, 1848; Ella Abra, born March 7, 
1850; Henry O. ; William Mose.s, born De- 
cember II, 1855, who married Decem.ber 18, 
1879, Alice M. Sargent; Carrie Deborah, born 
April 9, 1858, who died March i, 1890; and 
Maria Moulton, who was born October 18, 
1863, and died August 28, 1865. 

Llenry O. Fairbanks was educated in the 
public schools of Boston, being graduated 
from the English High School with the class 
of 1869. He at once entered the employ of 
Nazro & Co., commission merchants of that 
city, and there acquired a thorough knowledge 
of the flour and grain business. In 1881 he 
resigned his position to become manager of a 
large fiouring-mill at Columbus, Ohio, re- 
maining there a year, hi 1882 Mr. Fairbanks 
returned to Boston, and opened an office as a 
flour merchant on Commercial Street, where 
he soon established an extensive business, 
which has constantly increased. On the com- 
pletion of the present Chamber of Commerce 
he removed his office to that building, where 
he is still engaged, being the representative of 
several of the leading flouring-mills of the 
United States. Removing to Quincy soon 
after his marriage, Mr. Fairbanks has since 
been identified with the highest interests of 
this city. 

In 1889, when the city charter was granted, 
he represented Ward Five in the Common 
Council; and, being re-elected the succeeding 
year, he was unanimously chosen president of 
that body. In 1891 he was elected to the 
highest office within the gift of his fellow-cit- 
izens, being chosen Mayor of the city; and 
the ensuing two years he was honored with a 
re-election to the same position. During his 
mayoralty the town reached its one hundredth 
birthday; and he, as chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee having charge of the celebra- 
tion, did much to insure its success. While 
he was Mayor, the present system of water- 
works was completed, the commodious and 
well-equipped high-school building was 
erected, also the large central fire engine 
house, and the lawsuit of Quincy with Dart- 
mouth College over the Woodward fund was 
settled in the city's favor. 

In politics Mr. Fairbanks is a stanch Re- 



9i 



UlOGkAPHICAL REVIEW 



publican. He was made a Mason in Rural 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Quincy, of which 
he is Past Master; is a member of St. 
Stephen's Chapter, R. A. M.; and of South 
Shore Commandery ; and has been District 
Deputy of the Twenty-fourth Masonic Dis- 
trict. He also belongs to the John Hancock 
Lodge, L O. O. F. ; to the VVollaston Lodge, 
K. of H., of which he has been Dictator and 
District Deputy; Woodbine Lodge, K. & 
L. of H., which he has served as Protector; 
and he is a Past Sachem of Hodenosaunee 
Tribe, I. O. R. M. 

Mr. Fairbanks was married January 14, 
1875, ^'^ Miss Carrie A., daughter of Henry 
H. anil Julia V. (Severance) Brown, of l^os- 
ton, Mass. They have three children — Mabel 
F., Harry M., and Mollie E. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fairbanks are members of the Unitarian 
Church of Wollaston. 




AUSTIN THAYER, of Randolph, 
a dealer in coal and wood, hay, 
grain, shingles, brick, etc., was 
born in Randolph, February 27, 
1847, son of Rufus and Margery A. (\Vhite) 
Thayer. The Thayer family is an old one in 
this town. Rufus Thayer was an extensive 
land-owner here and a citizen of prominence 
and influence. A member of the old Whig 
party, he joined the Republican party at its 
formation, and continued one of its loyal 
supporters up to the time of his death, which 
occurred on May 25, 1853. His wife, Mar- 
gery, a native of Braintree, was a direct de- 
scendant of Peregrine White, who was the 
first white child born in New England. 
Rufus and Margery Thayer were the parents 
of five children, of whom Rufus A., Charles 
M., and S. Austin are living. 

S. Austin Thayer lost his father by death 
when young. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Randolph and 
in an academy at South Braintree. After- 
ward for two years he attended the Law- 
rence Scientific School at Cambridge, a de- 
partment of Harvard University. In 1876 he 
went to Kansas, and was for a number of 
years engaged in cattle and sheep raising at 
Solomon City. In 1884 he returned and en- 



gaged in the grain business at South Brain- 
tree, having erected a mill in that town. 
After remaining there for a year, he came to 
Randolph, built a mill here, and started in 
the same business. Subsequently he added 
coal, wood, and other merchandise to his 
stock in trade. His present prosperity is 
largely due to his punctual delivery of all 
goods bought, to his unfailing fairness in 
every transaction, and to the fact that every- 
thing he sells is as represented by him. 

Mr. Thayer and his brother, Rufus A., were 
among the active promoters of the Randolph 
Street Railway connecting Randolph and 
South Braintree. Probably no one man tak- 
ing part in the enterprise did more to forward 
it than did the subject of this sketch. For 
some time previously he saw that it would be 
of great convenience to the residents of both 
towns, and would increase the valuation of 
property. Every one now recognizes the 
value of the road and the wisdom of Mr. 
Thayer's vigorous action in securing it. 

Mr. Thayer is a well-known sportsman, 
being a fisherman of proverbial good luck and 
a famous shot. He makes occasional trips to 
Maine and the lower British Provinces, and 
invariably brings back trophies of his skill. 
In politics he is a Republican. He is the 
father of three children — Arthur A., Ethel, 
and Lena. 



rmc 



FORGE T. WILDE, the present 
\ '*) I efficient Clerk and Treasurer of Hol- 
brook and a leading merchant of the 
town, was born in Braintree, Mass., October 
7, 1845. He is a son of Atherton T. and Avis 
A. (Hobart) Wilde, both natives of Brain- 
tree. Atherton T. Wilde, who is now in his 
eighty-si.xth year, has been a farmer during the 
most of his life. He still resides in Brain- 
tree, where he is generally esteemed. 

George T. Wilde grew to manhood in Brain- 
tree, receiving his education in the public 
schools of that town and in Hollis Institute. 
When twenty-one years of age he was em- 
ployed as a clerk by B. F. Shaw & Henry 
Loud at East Weymouth, and afterward 
worked for them for about two years. He was 
subsequently a clerk for a year with S. W. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



93 



Hayden, of Neponset. In 1871 he came to 
Holbrook, purchased the business of Henry H. 
Packard, and has since carried on a general 
merchandise store. He removed to his pres- 
ent location in 1894. Hy careful and trust- 
worthy business methods he has built up for 
himself a prosperous business. He aims to 
keep a full line of the different classes of 
goods usually carried in a general merchandise 
store, and to have only stock of high grade. 
Satisfied with moderate rates of profit, he sup- 
plies his customers with goods at low prices. 

Mr. Wilde's wife was before her marriage 
Betsey B. White, daughter of Isaac W, White, 
late of Holbrook. Mr. and Mrs. Wilde 
have two children — George H. and Walter B. 
For years Mr. Wilde has taken an active in- 
terest in politics, constantly seeking "the 
greatest good of the greatest number," regard- 
less of personal considerations, and support- 
ing the Republican party. He has been the 
Town Clerk and Treasurer for nine years. 
He was one of the promoters and organizers 
of the Holbrook Co-operative Bank, and since 
its establishment has been its secretary and 
treasurer, with the exception of one year. 
An esteemed member of the Knights of 
Pythias of Holbrook, he is the present 
treasurer of the organization. He is a mem- 
ber of Winthrop Congregational Church of 
Holbrook. 




|ALEB LOTHROP, treasurer of the 
Cohassct Savings Bank, was born in 
Cohasset, Mass., September 7, 
1849, son of John Q. A. and 
Eunice B. (Bates) Lothrop. His parents 
were natives of Cohasset, as were also his 
grandparents, Caleb and Mary (Snow) Lo- 
throp. The English ancestor of the family 
was the Rev. John Lothrop, a noted preacher 
of his day; and Colonel Thomas Lothrop, a 
descendant of the Rev. John, served in the 
Revolutionary War. 

John Q. A. Lothrop, when a young man, 
learned the stair-builder's trade in Boston, 
but did not long follow it. For some time he 
was employed by his father in mackerel fish- 
ing, and for a number of years he held the ap- 
pointment of Custom-house Inspector at this 



port. He acted as a trustee and was finally 
elected president of the Cohasset Savings 
Bank, a position which he occupied at the 
time of his death. He was for a long period 
identified with the Board of Selectmen, both 
as a member and as chairman, was twice 
elected a County Commissioner, and served 
three terms in the legislature. Politically, 
he was a Republican; and his ability and ac- 
tivity as a party leader gained for him a wide 
acquaintance throughout the county. He was 
a member of Konohasset Lodge, F. & A. M. 
He died September 24, 1894, and his wife, 
June 23, 1897. Four of their children are 
living, namely: Caleb, the subject of this 
sketch; Mary T. L., wife of Charles A. 
Gross, of Cohasset; Ouincy A., who resides 
in Boston; and Eunice J., wife of Charles H. 
Cousins, a resident of this town. 

Caleb Lothrop acquired his education in the 
common schools, and for a time was employed 
by his uncle, Ephraim Snow, of East Boston. 
Entering the store of Tower Brothers as a 
clerk, he later became a partner in the busi- 
ness, and was connected with that concern 
until 1883, when he was elected treasurer of 
the Cohasset Savings Bank. Mr. Lothrop has 
occupied the position of registrar of the Water 
Company since its organization. In politics 
he is a Republican, has served the town as 
Auditor, and is now secretary and treasurer of 
the School Board. He is prominent in local 
musical circles, being leader of the choir at 
the First Congregational Church (Unitarian), 
of which he is a member; and he was at one 
time superintendent of the Sunday-school. 
Mr. Lothrop married Mary E. Gross, by whom 
he has two sons — Thomas A. and Charles G. 



tOSCOE J. 
Hill, Ncri 
known 



SHERMAN, of Walnut 
irfolk County, Mass., a well- 
and successful contractor 
and builder, was born in Edge- 
comb, Me., July 30, 1 86 1, a son of Jared and 
Emily (Baker) Sherman. 

Roger Sherman, father of Jared, was a 
farmer of Edgecomb, his native town. He 
died at the age of seventy-nine. Jared Sher- 
man was born in Edgecomb in 1820, and 
spent his life there, engaged in farming and 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



carpenter work. An active and public- 
spirited citizen, he served for some time as 
Selectman of the town. His wife, who was 
born in Edgecomb in 1833, and is now si.xty- 
four years of age, is a daughter of John Baker, 
a Revolutionary patriot, who lived to be 
eighty-four years old. Mrs. Sherman is living 
on the old homestead in Edgecomb. She is 
the mother of five children; namely, Roscoe 
J., Gertrude, Stanton D., Walter John, and 
VVinnifred M. 

Roscoe J. Sherman remained on the home 
farm until he was fourteen years of age, in 
the meantime attending school in Edgecomb. 
For five years he led a seafaring life, making 
a number of trips to the Western Banks, cod- 
fishing, two trips to the West Indies as an 
able seaman, and following the coasting trade 
for some time between New York and Boston 
and South Carolina. In 1882 he began to 
learn the carpenter's trade, working with 
Warren Worthington, with whom he remained 
nine years. He then formed a copartnership 
with Otis Worthington, which continued about 
four years; and since the dissolution of the 
firm Mr. Sherman has been sole manager of 
his business. Among the noteworthy build- 
ings he has constructed may be mentioned 
those of the Dedham Poor Farm. Most of his 
operations have been in Dedham and Newton 
Highlands. 

Mr. Sherman was married in 1892 to Mrs. 
Charlotte M. Cobb, daughter of Luther Whit- 
ney. She was born in Hyde Park in 1861. 
They have one child, a boy. Mr. Sherman 
votes the Republican ticket. He is an Odd 
Fellow, belonging to Samuel Dexter Lodge, 
No. 232. He is an attendant at the Meth- 
odist church, of which his wife is a member. 




METCALF FOGG, D.D.S., 
of Ouincy, Mass., is one of the lead- 
ing dentists of Norfolk County, 
having a large practice in this city 
and in adjacent towns. He was born Febru- 
ary 19, 1855, in Norwood, Mass., and is a son 
of the late David S. Fogg, M.D. 

Among his ancestors are representatives of 
the Fogg and Gilman families, from whom he 
is descended, who were prominent among the 



early settlers of New England. The I''ogg 
family estates in England, it is said, which 
were entailed, were recently held by Sir 
Charles Fogg. The History of Hampton, 
N.H., records the name of Samuel Fogg, 
probably the progenitor of most of the race 
in that State, as a grantee of land there 
in 1658. Ralph Fogg, who was made a free- 
man in Salem, Mass., in 1634, and was Town 
Treasurer in 1637, and was for some years ac- 
tive in municipal affairs, at length returned 
to London. The Gilmans are said to have 
originated in Wales. Edward Gilman, a na- 
tive of Hingham, Norfolk County, England, 
came to this country in 1638, landing in Bos- 
ton. A few years later he removed to Exeter, 
N.H., where his sons were already settled. 

Stephen Fogg and Bradbury Gilman, two of 
the great-grandfathers of Dr. Ralph M. Fogg, 
were born and bred in Exeter, N.H. ; and for 
many years the important points in the 
life history of these two men were nearly 
identical. Both were participants in the 
battle of Bunker Hill and in other memo- 
rable engagements of the Revolution; and at 
its close both married, moved to Meredith, 
N.H., and took up tracts of forest land on the 
banks of Lake Winnepesaukee, where each 
cleared and improved farms that are now in 
possession of his lineal descendants. Joseph 
I""ogg, the son of Stephen Fogg, and the Doc- 
tor's grandfather, held a commission as Cap- 
tain of a New Hampshire company in the War 
of 1812. He married Judith Gilman, daugh- 
ter of Bradbury Gilman. 

David Sylvester, their fourth son, attended 
Holmes Academy in Plymouth, N.H., and 
Dartmouth College, and then read medicine 
with Dr. Josiah Crosby, of Manchester, N.H., 
taking the degree of Doctor of Medicine at 
the Dartmouth Medical School in 1845. The 
succeeding year he spent in the medical 
schools and hospitals of Philadelphia, at that 
time the centre of medical culture. Coming 
to Norfolk County in 1846, he settled in that 
part of Dedham now known as Norwood, and 
built up an extensive and lucrative practice in 
that and surrounding towns, at his death in 
1893 being one of the most successful and 
best known physicians in this part of Massa- 
chusetts. In 1 86 1 he was appointed a volun- 




RALPH H. FOGG. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



97 



teer surgeon, and served in the Peninsular 
campaign. He was subsequently appointed by 
President Lincoln as surgeon of the Board of 
Enrolment for the Seventh Massachusetts Di- 
vision, and had his headquarters at Concord, 
this State, until the close of the Rebellion. 
Returning to Norwood, he resumed his former 
practice among the people whose confidence 
and respect he had long sijice won. He was 
a physician of great skill, a man of sterling 
character, distinguished for his love of right 
and humanity, and was highly esteemed by old 
and young. 

In 1847 he married Mary B. Tucker, a 
daughter of the Rev. Thomas W. Tucker, at 
that time in charge of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church at Dorchester Lower Mills. The 
children born of their union were: Mary (de- 
ceased) ; Irving S. Fogg, M. D., a graduate of 
Harvard College; Ralph Metcalf, the special 
subject of this biography; Mabel (deceased) ; 
Ada; Helen (deceased); Arthur and Ernest 
T. , both of Boston. The Doctor was a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Medical Society, the Mas- 
sachusetts Medical Society, and the American 
Medical Association. 

Mrs. David S. Fogg's grandfather Tucker, 
a native of England, married Hannah Waite 
in Medford, Mass. Thomas W. Tucker was 
the youngest of a large family of children born 
of this union. He became a member of the 
Bromfield Street Methodist Episcopal Church 
in Boston when nineteen years old, and two 
years later was ordained a minister of that de- 
nomination, with which he was actively identi- 
fied for more than threesccrre years. For a 
long period he was an itinerant preacher of the 
New England Conference, his circuit extend- 
ing through New Hampshire and Vermont. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Orne, 
was born in Charlestown, N.H. A woman of 
superior qualities of mind and heart, she be- 
came his worthy helpmeet, and was honored in 
the church and conference as a true mother in 
Israel. Mr. Tucker was eminently successful 
in his pastoral labors, by his earnest efforts 
winning large numbers of men, women, and 
children to espouse the Master's cause, and 
greatly increasing the membership of the 
churches. The Rev. Edward T. Taylor, 
familiarly known as "Father Taylor," for 



many years pastor of the Sailors' Bethel, Bos- 
ton, was one of his early converts. The Rev. 
Thomas W. Tucker passed to the higher life 
in 1871, at Chelsea, Mass., aged eighty years. 

Ralph M. I'ogg received his elementary ed- 
ucation at private schools, afterward attending 
successively Dean Academy in Franklin, 
Mass., and the Harvard Dental College. In 
1880 he began the practice of dentistry, open- 
ing offices in both Norwood and Boston, and 
met with good success from the first. In 1893 
he gave up his office in Boston, retaining the 
one in Norwood, and opened two others, one 
in Ouincy and one in Dedham ; and in each of 
these places he has a large patronage. For 
years Dr. Fogg was dissatisfied with nitrous 
o.xide gas as an an:esthetic, it failing to pro- 
tect the patient against pain; and, in trying to 
find some harmless compound to accomplish 
the desired results, he made many e.\-peri- 
ments, and after much study produced the 
"Boston Vegetable Vapor," an anaesthetic that 
has proved eminently successful. In 1885 the 
Boston Vegetable Anaesthetic Company was 
formed for the purpose of placing the vapor 
on the market, and it has since been used by 
leading dentists in all parts of the country 
with most satisfactory results. Dr. Fogg is 
a member of the State Dental Association. 

In December, 1893, Dr. Fogg married Miss 
Anna Saville, a daughter of Charles P"rancis 
Saville, of Ouincy, Mass. A brief history of 
her paternal ancestors may be found on 
another page of this volume, in connection 
with the sketch of her cousin, George Saville. 
Dr. and Mrs. Fogg are members of the Epis- 
copal church. 




EV. WALTER RUSSELL BREED, 
B.S., B. D., the rector of Christ 
Church, Ouincy, was born January 
10, 1866. in Lynn, Esse.x County, 
Mass. His father, Joseph Breed, a native of 
Lynn, Mass., born in 1826, who was a well- 
known merchant of that city throughout his 
entire business life, married Frances, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. John T. Burrill. They reared 
si.x children — Anna, George, Arthur, Henry, 
Walter, and Laura. George is now a resident 
of Lynn. Arthur, also residing in Lynn, has 



BlOGRAtHICAL REVIEW 



served as State Senator, and been a member of 
the Governor's Council. Laura is the wife of 
Charles Walker. The Rev. John T. Burrill 
was for some years the pastor of the Quincy 
Point church. Subsequently, after entering 
the Episcopal denomination, he became rector 
of Christ Church in Quincy, and later was the 
rector of the Old North Church in Boston, 
during the decade of the si.\ties. 

Walter Russell Breed was educated in the 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, Conn., 
graduating therefrom in 1887 with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. Three years 
later, having taken the prescribed course of 
study in the Episcopal Theological School at 
Cambridge, Mass., he there received the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Divinity. He was subse- 
quently ordained Deacon by Bishop Padtlock 
in Cambridge, and priest in Tarrytown, 
N.Y., by Bishop Potter. His first pastoral 
charge was the Episcopal church at Concord, 
Mass., where he was settled for three years. 
In November, 1893, he accepted the rector- 
ship ot Christ Church, Quincy, where he has 
zealously labored in his sacred calling. 

A man of broad culture, Mr. Breed is 
deeply interested in the cause of education, 
which he has done much to advance as a mem- 
ber of the Quincy School Board and the 
chairman of the Board's Committee on Even- 
ing Schools. Also connected with the Wood- 
ward School since its organization, he is now 
the vice-president of its Board of Trustees. 
On June 4, 1894, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Ellen Broderick Zelmer, a daughter 
of William Zelmer, of Lansford, Pa., and now 
has one child, William Zelmer Breed. 




'ENAS A. FRENCH, the chairman 
and secretary of the Board of Asses- 
sors of Holbrook, was born in this 
town on September 4, 1843, son of 
the Hon. Zenas and Julia (Tower) French. 
The French family is of English origin. Its 
first representative in America was John 
French, who came here about the year 1630. 
Captain Moses French, the great-grandfather 
of Zenas A., commanded a company of soldiers 
in the Revolution. His son Zenas, who was 
a drummer in the same war, became very 



prominent as a citizen, and served in the 
legislative session of 181 8. Zenas (second), 
father of the subject of this sketch, was for 
seventeen successive years a Selectman ot the 
old town of Randolph, represented it in the 
legislature in 1837 and 1839, and was State 
Senator from Norfolk County in 1852. He 
was a Republican from the time of the forma- 
tion of the party, and took a leading part in 
its work. He voted for General P'remont, and 
was president of the local Fremont Club at 
East Randolph, now Holbrook. His mother, 
it is said, was a descendant of John Alden, of 
the Plymouth Colony. Julia, his wife, was a 
native of Braintree, Mass. Her grandfather 
was a member of the famous Boston Tea Party. 
The Hon. Zenas and Julia French were the 
parents of seven children. Of these, five are 
lilting, namely: Mrs. A. H. Platts, of Abing- 
ton; Zenas A., the subject of this sketch; and 
Ruth W. , Sarah R., and Caroline F., who re- 
side in Holbrook. 

Zenas A. French was reared on his father's 
estate in Holbrook, receiving his education in 
the public schools of the town. At the age 
of twenty-one years he was employed as a 
cutter in the boot and shoe manufactory of 
Thomas White, of East Randolph. Subse- 
quently he entered the employ of Edmund 
White, working for him from 1865 until 1893, 
most of the time in the capacity of general 
superintendent of the shop. For si.xteen 
years he has been a member of the Holbrook 
School Committee; and for a number of years 
he was chairman of the board, which position 
he now holds, in the spring of 1897 having 
been unanimously elected to the School Board. 
He is also chairman of the Board of Assessors. 
In 189s he occupied a seat in the legislature, 
and he served as a member of the legislative 
Committee on Education. While his politi- 
cal principles are warmly Republican, he is 
heartily in sympathy with the aims of the 
Prohibitionists. 

Mr. French married Lucy J. Beebe, of 
Hampden, Mass. They have one daughter, 
Linda M. Mr. French is a director of the 
Holbrook Co-operative Bank, and he has been 
the librarian of the Holbrook Public Library 
since its establishment in 1874. Fraternally, 
he is a member of the Knights of Honor. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



99 




|EV. CARLOS SLAFTER is a highly 
respected resident of Dedham. A 
man of scholarly attainments and 
broad culture, a teacher for a full 
half-century, and the principal of the Dedham 
High School for forty consecutive years, many 
of the leading men of this and neighboring 
towns, including merchants, ministers, doc- 
tors, and lawyers, as well as their wives and 
children, are indebted to him for a large por- 
tion of their educational and moral training. 
He was born July 21, 1825, in Thetford, Vt., 
son of Sylvester and Mary (Johnson) Slafter. 
His grandfather, John Slafter, was born in 
Mansfield, Conn. When a ynung man, John 
removed to Norwich, Vt., where he was the 
first permanent settler, and was numbered 
among the leading farmers. He served as a 
soldier in the French and Indian War, and 
also for a short time in the Revolution, 
being a member of the Committee of Safety, 
and was present at the surrender of Burgoyne. 
He lived eighty years, and held town office. 
During most of the years he was a citizen of 
Norwich. 

Sylvester Slafter, born and reared in Nor- 
wich, after reaching man's estate settled in 
the neighboring town of Thetford, where he 
was afterward engaged in general farming and 
fruit-growing until his demise, at the age of 
seventy years. He was active in town affairs, 
serving in various offices. His wife, Mary, 
was a daughter of Calvin Johnson, of Norwich, 
who for four years served in the Revolutionary 
army, taking an active part in many of the 
battles of that war. They reared ten chil- 
dren, of whom Edmund, Mrs. Christiana 
Tilden, Lyman, and Carlos are living. The 
mother passed away years before her husband, 
dying at the age of fifty-two years. Both 
parents were members of the Congregational 
church. 

Carlos Slafter was fitted for Dartmouth in 
the Thetford Academy, and was graduated 
from that college with the class of 1849. Be- 
ginning when but sixteen years old, he had 
previously taught school for several terms in 
Fairlee, Vt., and in Lyme, N. H. While in 
college he taught for three winters in Massa- 
chusetts. In 1851 and 1852 he had charge of 
the Framingham High School and Academy. 



From there he came to Dedham in the latter 
year, to accept the position of master of the 
Dedham High School. This position he had 
ably filled for forty years, when he resigned 
his charge, in June, 1892. When he took the 
school he was the only teacher of its thirty- 
five pupils. In 1892 the number of students 
enrolled was one hundred and seventy, while 
the corps of instructors included five other 
teachers beside himself. 

Mr. Slafter was married August 4, 1853, to 
Miss Rebecca Bui lard. She was born in Ded- 
ham, daughter of William Bullard, a substan- 
tial farmer and the representative of one of 
the earliest families of this locality. Mr. and 
Mrs. Slafter have two children, namely: 
Theodore S., an artist, in Dedham; and Anna 
R., the wife of Calvin Countryman, a mer- 
chant of Rockford, 111. In the capacity of 
master of the high school Mr. Slafter was 
identified with the highest interests of Ded- 
ham. He was also largely instrumental in 
securing the establishment of the public li- 
brary, of which he is one of the trustees, and 
he has been active in the Historical Society, 
of which he is a curator. He was ordained 
Deacon by Bishop Eastburn in Trinity 
Church, Boston, May, 1865, and was after- 
ward chaplain of the jail of Norfolk County 
for several years. In politics he has the 
courage of his convictions, voting for the 
best men, regardless of party dictation. 

Since relinquishing the work of an instruc- 
tor, he has devoted much of his leisure to writ- 
ing for periodicals, historical discourses, and 
the composition of several books still unpub- 
lished and not yet dismissed from his careful 
revision. 



OHN W. CHASE, M.D., one of the 
most active and skilful physicians of 
Norfolk County, has been a resident of 
Dedham for thirty years; and during 
this time he has been busily employed, and has 
built up a very large and lucrative practice. 
He was born December 9, 1839, in tapping, 
N.H., a son of Prescott and Sally (Sanborn) 
Chase, and comes of old Colonial stock. 

Among the emigrants bearing this surname 
may be mentioned, first, Aquila, of Newbury, 



100 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mass., 1646, having been at Hampton, N.H., 
in 1640, wlio was the founder of a numerous 
family; his brother Thomas, of Hampton; and 
William, of Roxbury, 1630. Jonathan, Jr., 
son of Jonathan Chase, Sr., and grandfather 
of Dr. Chase, was born, lived, and died in 
Epping, where he was engaged in general 
farming until his death, at the age of seventy- 
seven years. 

Prescott Chase was one of a family of two 
children born to his parents. His entire life 
of sixty-nine years was spent in his native 
town, where he was numbered among the lead- 
ing agriculturists, and was a leading citizen. 
Possessed of those traits of industry and thrift 
characteristic of the true New luiglander, and 
guided by the principles of honesty and integ- 
rity, he became influential in the community, 
and was held in high respect by all who knew 
him. It was a common saying that Prescott 
Chase"s word was as good as his bond. He 
married Sally Sanborn, a daughter of Zebulon 
Sanborn, a farmer and lumberman, and a 
prominent citizen of Epping, N.H. Eight 
children were born of their union, five of 
whom are now living, as follows: John W. , 
the Doctor; Samuel; Jennie, the wife of 
Daniel K. Foster; Frank; and Hattie. The 
mother, Mrs. Sally S. Chase, is now, at the 
advanced age of seventy-nine years, living at 
the old homestead in Epping, N.H. She is a 
member of the Congregational church, with 
which her husband also was connected. 

John W. Chase received his preliminary ed- 
ucation in the district schools of his native 
town and at the academy in Kingston. Dur- 
ing the war of the Rebellion he served for 
some time as a hospital steward in the regular 
United States Army. He subsequently pur- 
sued his professional studies in the Medical 
School of Maine, at Bowdoin College, in 
Brunswick, Me., being graduated in 1867. 
On August 12 of that year the young Doctor 
located in Dedham, and in the practice of his 
profession met witli such success from the 
start that he has since continued here. In 
1873, with the desire to still further perfect 
himself in the science of medicine and sur- 
gery, he visited some of the principal hospi- 
tals and colleges of Europe, pursuing his 
studies and attending lectures in Leipsic, 



Vienna, and London, he being the only prac- 
titioner in this section of the county to take 
such a course of study. 

In Bnmswick, Me., on June 16, 1869, Dr. 
Chase married Miss Harriet E. Weeman, who 
was born in Freeport, Me., a daughter of 
James Pope and Elizabeth (True) Weeman. 
Mr. Weeman was a hardware merchant in 
F"reeport until 1866, when he removed to 
Brunswick, Me., where he is still actively en- 
gaged in business pursuits, although seventy- 
nine years old. His wife died some years 
ago, aged seventy-two years. They reared 
three children, of whom two are living — Mrs. 
Chase and her sister, Abbie C. Mr. and Mrs. 
Weeman were both members of the Congrega- 
tional church, and for many years he was a 
Deacon. Dr. and Mrs. Chase are the parents 
of three children, two of whom are living; 
namely, Alice W. and Julian D. , the latter a 
bright and active youth of fifteen, now prepar- 
ing for a scientific education. Grace Lillian 
died aged eight months. 

Dr. Chase is a stanch supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party. He has been 
a member of the School Board one year, of 
the Board of Health four years, and for four 
years under President Harrison's administra- 
tion he was pension examiner. Being wide- 
awake and public-spirited, he takes great in- 
terest in the establishment of enterprises 
calculated to benefit the town, and is one of 
the promoters and a large stockholder of the 
Norfolk Suburban Street Railway, and also of 
the Norfolk Central Railway. 

The Doctor is a member of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society of Norfolk County, and 
for twenty-five consecutive years was county 
physician, holding the office for a longer time 
than any other incumbent since the office was 
established. Fraternally, he is a member of 
Constellation Lodge, F. & A. M., of Dedham; 
of the A. O. U. W.; of the Knights of 
Honor; of the Royal Arcanum; and of the 
New England Order of Protection. He and 
his family are attendants of the Congrega- 
tional church. Mrs. Chase, a woman of cult- 
ure and refinement, was educated in the high 
school of Brunswick, Me., and for some years 
prior to her marriage was a successful teacher 
in that college town. 




■■'^- 



LKAVITT l!ATi:.S. 



BIOGRAPHICAL KKVIKW 



103 



'OSEPH A. GUSHING, a prominent 
citizen of East Weymouth, now man- 
ager of the bicycle sundry department 
of the John P. Lovell Arms Gompany, 
lioston, was born in Hingham, Mass., Decem- 
ber 24, 1846, son of Adam and Harriet (Lor- 
ing) Gushing, botii parents natives of tliat old 
Plymouth Gounty town. 

The Gushing family is an old and honored 
one in this section of the State, and is of 
English origin. The emigrant ancestor, 
Matthew Gushing, settled in Hingham in 
1638. Of the sixth generation in lineal de- 
scent from Matthew was Mr. Joseph A. Gush- 
ing's grandfather, Jonathan Gushing, who 
took a leading part in town affairs in Hing- 
ham in the early part of the century, serving 
as Selectman, and also as a Representative to 
the General Goiirt. Adam Gushing, above 
named, was a soldier in the War of 1812; and 
his widow drew a government pension on that 
account. 

When Joseph A. Gushing was twelve years 
of age, his parents removed to Gohasset; and 
he was educated in the public schools of that 
town, including the high school. When he 
was eighteen years old, his father died; and he 
shortly became self-supporting, beginning his 
working life as clerk in the revenue office at 
Hingham. After serving there for some time, 
he was employed for several years as book- 
keeper for A. W. Glapp & Go., boot and shoe 
dealers of Boston, and then went to North 
Weymouth, where he became identified with 
Ale.xis Torry & Go., manufacturers of boots 
and shoes, as clerk and treasurer, in which po- 
sition he remained for twenty years. Since 
that time he has filled his present position 
with the John P. Lovell Arms Gompany. 

Mr. Gushing married Dora L. Benson, a 
native of Falmouth, Mass., and a lady of taste 
and culture. He is a Republican in politics, 
and has been interested in various ways in the 
administration of public affairs in the town. 
He has been on the School Gommittee of 
Weymouth for nine years, and part of the time 
was clerk of the board. He has also been Au- 
ditor. He was formerly treasurer of the East 
Weymouth Savings Bank, of which he is now 
vice-president, trustee, and a member of its 
Board of Investment. In religious belief Mr. 



Gushing is a Methodist, and he and his wife 
are members of the Methodist P2piscopal 
church. He is a steward and trustee, and is 
now treasurer of the society. Fraternally, he 
is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the 
Temple of Honor at East Weymouth. In 
1890 he was Representative to the State legis- 
ature, and while there served on the Gommit- 
tee on Banks and Banking. 




EAVITT BATES, a former resident of 
P3ast Weymouth, who had served in 
the Givil War, and was well known 
in the wholesale clothing trade of 
Boston, was born in Weymouth, August 11, 
1843. His father, Abraham Bates, was a na- 
tive of Weymouth; and his mother, Susan L. 
(Stoddard) Bates, was born in Hingham, 
Mass. 

Leavitt Bates attended the common and 
high schools of Weymouth for the usual 
period, and completed his studies at a busi- 
ness college in Boston. His business career 
was begun in the general store of Henry Loud 
at East Weymouth, where he remained until 
1861. In this year he enlisted as a private in 
Gompany A, P'orty-second Regiment, Massa- 
chusetts Volunteers, for nine months' service 
in the Givil War. After the expiration of his 
first term of service he re-enlisted in the 
Fourth Heavy Artillery, with which he served 
until mustered out at the close of the war. 
Upon his return home he resumed his former 
position with Mr. Loud, serving in the capac- 
ity of salesman and that of assistant in the 
post-ofifice, which was located in the store. 
Subsequently he became book-keeper for a 
Boston house dealing in tailors' supplies. 
Later he entered the wholesale clothing busi- 
ness as a member of the firm of Smith, Rich- 
ardson & Bates, doing business on Summer 
Street, Boston. After the withdrawal of Mr. 
Richardson the concern was known as Smith, 
Bates & Go. Mr. Bates was also interested 
in the East Weymouth Savings Bank, of which 
he was a director. His connection with the 
clothing firm continued until his death, which 
occurred suddenly in New York, May 6, 1888, 
while representing the Providence District at 
the General Gonference of the Methodist Epis- 



104 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



copal Church held in that city. He was not 
quite forty-five years old at the time, and the 
event was a shock to his business associates 
and fellow-townsmen. He took a deep inter- 
est in the general welfare and progress of East 
Weymouth, and his wise counsels and valu- 
able assistance in all matters of public impor- 
tance are still remembered by his townsmen. 
His business ability and integrity were of a 
high standard. He was an active member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and he 
served as its treasurer for seventeen years. 
He was connected with the Masonic fraternity, 
and was a comrade of Reynolds Post, G. A. R., 
of Weymouth. His political views were 
strongly Republican. 

On December ii, 1867, Mr. Bates was 
united in marriage with Anne E. Tirrell, of 
Weymouth. She is a daughter of Harrison 
F. S. and Elizabeth (Jacob) Tirrell. The 
former was a native of this town, and the 
latter was born in Hingham. Mrs. Bates's 
paternal grandfather was Norton Q. Tirrell. 
On her mother's side she is a descendant of 
John Hancock, the American patriot and 
statesman. She became the mother of three 
children ^ Harry W., Leavitt W., and Emma 
E. Since the death of her husband Mrs. 
Bates has continued to reside at 73 Broad 
Street. She is connected with the Women's 
Relief Corps, is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and stands high in the es- 
timation of the entire community. 




IDMUND WHITE, a well-known citizen 
of Holbrook, Mass., for many years a 
leading manufacturer of boots and 
shoes, is a native of this town, until recent 
years known as East Randolph. He was born 
on August 21, 1823, his parents being 
Thomas and Meriel (Burr) White, the former 
a native of Holbrook, and the latter of Co- 
hasset. 

John White (great-grandfather of Edmund) 
and Joseph White, brother of John, were 
among the earliest settlers in East Randolph, 
now Holbrook. They were of English de- 
scent, and belonged to an old Colonial family. 
Their earliest progenitor in America bearing 
this surname was Thomas White, who is said 



to have been "admitted a freeman of the Mas- 
sachusetts Colony in 1636, being then and 
previously an inhabitant of Weymouth and a 
member of the church." Thomas White, of a 
later generation, father of Edmund White, 
was a shoemaker early in life, and later be- 
came interested in agricultural pursuits. 

Mr. Edmund White received his early men- 
tal training in the common schools of Hol- 
brook. The education thus acquired he has 
supplemented by reading and by close obser- 
vation of men and afifairs during the years of 
his business life. He is in every way a self- 
made man; and his success has been due, not 
to exceptional opportunities at the beginning, 
but to his purpose and readiness to make the 
most of every opportunity for personal im- 
provement, and to his persevering energy, 
ambition, and enterprise. When about twelve 
years of age; he began to learn the shoe- 
maker's trade, and when eighteen years old he 
was recognized as an expert Crispin. He 
worked at this handicraft as a journeyman 
until twenty-five years of age, when he started 
in business for himself as a boot and shoe 
manufacturer. At the start he had a partner, 
George N. Spear, and the business was carried 
on under the name of White & Spear. A 
short time after, William Gray being added to 
the firm, it became White & Gray. For a 
number of years I\Ir. White carried on busi- 
ness alone; and in 1865 he formed a partner- 
ship with his brother Thomas, which existed 
for over five years. From the expiration of 
that time he was sole manager of a manufact- 
uring business up to 1893, when he retired. 
Mr. White started manufacturing in a small 
way, and gradually increased until he carried 
on a very extensive business. His plant in 
Holbrook was among the larger manufacturing 
enterprises of New England, and employed at 
times as many as three hundred hands. 

The marked administrative ability that has 
enabled Mr. White to become the head of a 
great manufacturing concern also demonstrates 
his fitness for other positions where breadth 
of outlook and sound judgment are needed. 
His townsmen have recognized his desirabil- 
ity and fitness for public office, and in 1882 
he served as Representative from the Sixth 
Norfolk District to the State legislature. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL Rf:VIP:vV 



'OS 



was on the Fisheries Committee. His record 
as a legislator is as untainted as his record as 
a business man. 

Mr. White has three children living; 
namely, Emmons, Edmund B., and Albert B. , 
the last two named being graduates of Yale 
College. Mr. White is a Republican in poli- 
tics. He is in favor of any movement looking 
to the general imj^rovement of society or the 
welfare of his native town. He is one of the 
Deacons of Winthrop Congregational Church 
of Holbrook. 




,\CA^/ IE LI AM NASH, a prosperous gen- 
eral merchant and Postmaster of 
Nash, was born in Weymouth, 
Mass., April 6, 1835, son of William G. and 
Dorothy (Torrey) Nash. He is a representa- 
tive of one of the oldest and most highly repu- 
table families in Weymouth; and his grand- 
father, Joshua Nash, was a lifelong resident 
of Nash's Corners. William G. Nash and his 
wife were born in this town; and the former, 
who for many years kept a general store at 
"The Corners," is now eighty-eight years old. 
He has reared several children, of whom the 
survivors are: William, Maria D., and El- 
bridge. The last-named is a druggist of 
South Weymouth. 

William Nash, after attending the schools 
of his town, at the age of nineteen engaged in 
the manufacture of shoes. The depression in 
business caused by the outbreak^of the Civil 
War so affected his particular line of industry 
that he relinquished it, and, entering his 
father's store as an assistant, eventually suc- 
ceeded to the business, which he has since 
carried on successfully. Politically, he is a 
Republican; and in July, 1892, he was ap- 
pointed Postmaster of Nash. He was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen of Weymouth 
for fifteen years, and he also served as Over- 
seer of the Poor. For a number of years he 
has been a Justice of the Peace. During his 
long period of public service he has been in- 
strumental in accomplishing much toward the 
improvement of the town. He is connected 
with Orphans' Hope Lodge, F. & A. M., of 
East Weymouth, and with the Lodge of Odd 
Fellows at South Weymouth. In his religious 



belief he is a Congregationalist. Mr. Nash 
is married, and has three children — Annie 
M., William B., and Elbridge B. Na.sh. > 



fOUIS N. LINCOLN, of the f^rm of 
Lincoln Brothers, of Cohasset, dealers 
^ in wood and coal, was born Janu- 
ary 27, 1827, a son of Joseph and 
Mary H. (Nichols) Lincoln, native residents 
of this town. He comes of old New England 
stock, being a descendant in the seventh gen- 
eration of Samuel Lincoln, who settled in Co- 
hasset, then a part of Hingham, in 1637. 
From Samuel the line is traced through 
Daniel, Hezekiah, Francis, Zenas, to Joseph, 
the father of the subject of this sketch. Jo- 
seph Lincoln, who was a native of Cohasset, 
was a carpenter by trade. He died in 1869. 
His wife died in 1867. Of their children the 
following are living: Samuel N. ; Zenas D., 
a member of the firm of Lincoln Brothers; 
and Louis N. 

Louis N. Lincoln grew to manhood in his 
native town, acquiring his education in the 
public schools. In 1842, when he was but fif- 
teen years of age, he began to learn the brick 
mason's trade in Boston with his older 
brother, Henry Lincoln, now deceased. In 
1850 Mr. Lincoln was engaged as clerk in the 
store of John Simmons, a wholesale and retail 
clothing merchant of Boston; and he re- 
mained in Mr. Simmons's employ about six 
years. P"or a number of years he has been in 
business as an auctioneer and real estate 
dealer; and in 1879, with his brother, he es- 
tablished the coal and wood business now 
managed by the firm of Lincoln Brothers, an 
enterprise which has been very successful. 
Several years ago Mr. Lincoln became a trus- 
tee of the Cohasset Savings Bank, and he was 
elected vice-president. He has also been for 
a number of years a member of the Board of 
Investment of the bank, and for an extended 
period he has held the office of president of 
the Cohasset Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 

On September 15, 1850, Mr. Lincoln was 
united in marriage with Miss Eliza A. Liv- 
ingstone, of Boston, Mass. The\- had one 
daughter, P^ffie P". , who died October 21, 
1873. In politics Mr. Lincoln is a Demo- 



io6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



crat, and some years ago he was closely iden- 
tified with the political affairs of Cohasset. 
In 1870 he was elected Selectman, Assessor, 
and Overseer of the Poor; and he served as 
such eight successive years. He was chair- 
man of the Board of Selectmen for some time, 
a member of the Board of Health, and he was 
also Constable of Cohasset. Mr. Lincoln is 
a member of the First Congregational (Unita- 
rian) Society of this town. 




'ENRY A. NASH, the well-known 
cashier of the Union National Bank 
in Weymouth, Mass., was born in 
this town, November 23, 1829, son 
of Abner P. and Silence W. (Humphrey) 
Nash. Timothy Nash, his paternal grand- 
father, who was a Revolutionary soldier, was 
a descendant of an English family that settled 
in Weymouth early in the seventeenth cen- 
tury. Abner P. Nash, son of Timothy, was 
an early shoe manufacturer of Weymouth: 
and afterward he engaged in the shoe and 
leather business in Boston. Three of his 
children now survive: Henry A.; Almena, 
wife of Israel D. Wildes, of Weymouth; and 
George H., residing in Oakland, la. 

Mr. Henry A. Nash received his education 
in the public schools of Weymouth, at Leices- 
ter Academy, and at Milton Academy. At the 
age of sixteen he became a clerk in his 
father's shoe and leather establishment in 
Boston; and upon attaining his majority he 
was made a partner in the business, under the 
firm name of Abner P. Nash & Co., this firm 
existing until 1854. In that year the younger 
partner withdrew from the concern to estab- 
lish a like business in San Francisco, Cal., in 
partnership with T. W. Beamis and Parker S. 
Fogg, with whom he continued for ten years. 
Soon after his return to Weymouth, in 1865, 
Mr. Nash was chosen a director of the Union 
National Bank, also holding the office of pres- 
ident of the bank for a time; and in 1896 he 
was appointed to his present position of 
cashier. For several years past he has been 
president of the Weymouth Savings Bank. 

By his wife, Betsey B. White, also a native 
of Weymouth, now deceased, Mr. Nash had 
three children, two of whom are now living. 



His son, Harry A., Jr., has an ofifice in Bos- 
ton as a civil engineer. 

Mr. Nash may be called a self-made man, 
his success in life being due to his diligent 
application to business and his faithfulness 
in the administration of trusts. He has al- 
ways devoted much time and attention to local 
affairs, having served as one of the Selectmen 
for a period of thirteen years, for twelve years 
as clerk of the board, and since 1884 as a 
member of the Board of Water Commissioners 
of the town, also acting as clerk of that board. 
He always votes independently, favoring 
things that make for progress, and, as a man 
of intelligence and undoubted integrity, com- 
mands the respect and confidence of all who 
know him. 




NDREW J. GOVE, proprietor of a 
flourishing livery and express busi- 
ness in Randolph and formerly a 
member of the Massachusetts legis- 
lature, was born in the town now known as 
Plainfield, N. H., October 26, 1834, son of 
Isaiah and Mary (Brown) Gove. The Gove 
family, of which he is a representative, was 
founded in America by three brothers, who 
emigrated from England at an early date in 
the Colonial period. Of the one who located 
in New Hampshire, the subject of this sketch 
is a direct descendant. Isaiah Gove and his 
wife were both natives of the Granite State, 
and the former was an industrious tiller of the 
soil. 

Andrew J. Gove was reared to farm life; but 
at the age of nineteen he went to Boston, 
where he remained a short time, removing 
thence to South Weymouth, where also he 
made but a short stay. Subsequently going to 
Hingham, he obtained his first experience as 
an expressman in the employ of David Gush- 
ing. In 1858 he came to Randolph, where he 
was employed in the same business by Will- 
iam Cole, and later by Charles Estabrook. 
From 1865 to 1871 he was engaged in busi- 
ness for himself at East Randolph. After- 
ward, returning to Randolph, he purchased the 
express route of his former employer, Charles 
Estabrook, and has since conducted a profitable 
business between this town and Boston. 




RUPERT F. CLAFLIN. 



BIOG R A I'H IC AJ. REV I FAV 



[09 



Since 1882 he has also carried on a first-class 
livery stable, and he enjoys the liberal patron- 
age and good will of the community. Being 
elected to the legislature for the years 1873 
and 1874, he made a capable Representative, 
proving faithful to the interests of his con- 
stituents. He is well advanced in Masonry, 
being a member of the Blue Lotlge in Ran- 
dolph, and is a charter member of l^ay State 
Commandery, K. T., of Brockton. 

Mr. Gove married Sarah L. C'Lishing, of 
Hingham, and by her has two children: Alice 
C., wife of J. S. Fowler, of Hingham; and 
A. Florence Gove, who resides with her par- 
ents. 




lUI'ERT FRANI-CLIN CLAFLIN, 
who has been cashier of the National 
|ID\ Granite Bank of Ouincy, Mass., for 
more than a cjuarter of a century, 
was born in Boston, September 29, 1845, a'""! 
is a son of the late Thomas J. Claflin. 

His paternal grandfather, James Claflin, 
was born in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century in Barre, Mass., whence he enlisted 
as a soldier in the War of 1812. He subse- 
quently engaged in farming in Hopkinton, 
Middlesex County. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Susan Wadsworth, was a direct de- 
scendant of two of the early presidents of Har- 
vard College, the Rev. Benjamin Wadsworth 
and the Rev. Samuel Willard. She was a 
woman of remarkable energy and strong physi- 
cal powers, being bright and active until her 
death, which occurred at the age of ninety- 
seven years from la grippe. 

Thomas J. Claflin was born in Hopkinton, 
Mass., and in the common schools of that town 
received his education. He started in the 
railroad business when a young man, in the 
early days of the Old Colony Railway, on 
which for seventeen years he was employed as 
a conductor, a large part of the time having 
charge of the "steamboat train" running be- 
tween Boston and Fall River. This position 
gave him a very large acquaintance with the 
leading merchants of New England, who in 
their frequent trips to New York were his pas- 
sengers. He was a man of marked personal- 
ity, very genial and accommodating, and noted 



for his power of c|uick and apt repartee. On 
leaving the railroad, he lived retired from ac- 
tive business until his death, at the age of 
seventy-seven years. He married Mary A., 
daughter of Anthony Holbrook, of Boston, 
Mass. Of their union four children were 
born, as follows: Rupert Franklin; Fred- 
erick A., of Boston; Hettie H., wife of 
George F. Whall, of Littleton, Mass. ; and 
James Alfred, of Wollaston. The parents 
were not members of any religious organiza- 
tion, but were of the Orthodo.x faith. 

Rupert F. Claflin received a substantial ed- 
ucation in the public schools of Boston, con- 
tinuing his studies until fourteen years of age, 
when he became messenger boy in a wholesale 
dry-goods house, his salary being fifty dollars 
per annum. He remained there a year, and 
the next year was employed in a specie 
broker's of^ce. Twelve months later he be- 
came assistant to the ticket master in the Bos- 
ton office of the Old Colony Railway Com- 
pany, where he sold tickets for a little more 
than a year. Securing then a situation in 
the National Bank of Redemption, which was 
called the Bank of Mutual Redemption, under 
the old State bank system, he remained there 
a year. He was subsequently employed in 
the Atlas Bank an equal length of time, after 
which he went to Chicago, where he worked 
for a year and a half, part of the time in a 
railway office and during the remaining 
months with a real estate dealer. Returning 
East, he was soon made cashier of the Hop- 
kinton Bank at Hopkinton, Mass., and was 
also elected treasurer of the Hopkinton Sav- 
ings Bank, positions which he retained three 
years, resigning to come to Ouincy. Here 
on the 1st of July, 1871, he assumed the 
cashiership of the National Granite Bank; and 
he has since discharged the duties of this po- 
sition with marked ability and faithfulness. 
Mr. Claflin has also been a member of the 
Board of Directors of this bank for many years, 
and since 1890 has been president of the 
Ouincy .Savings Bank. He is likewise treas- 
urer of the Ouincy .Shoe Company and one of 
the directorate of the Braintree Street Rail- 
way Company. 

In politics he has always been independent, 
voting regardless of party affiliations, Hf 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



served as Notary Public fourteen years, and 
for five years was a member of the School 
Board, three years being its chairman. Fra- 
ternally, he is a member of the Massachusetts 
Reform Club of Boston, of the Granite City 
Club, and of the Suburban Bank Cashiers' 
Association. He is very progressive in his 
views, and has been somewhat active in cur- 
rent reformatory movements, having been 
made president of the first Tariff Reform 
League established in Ouincy, of the Civil 
Service Reform League, and of the lousiness 
Men's Association. He has devoted much of 
his leisure time to physical culture, always 
striving to perfect his physical condition, with 
a view to performing his mental work to the 
best advantage and to obtaining the highest 
enjoyment of the fast fleeting years. Since 
1882 he has been a devotee of the bicycle, and 
prior to that time he was an enthusiastic pe- 
destrian in a private way. 

In 1869 Mr. Claflin married Miss Lydia M., 
daughter of James B. Hull, of Lombard, 111. 
She died in 1877, leaving two children, who 
subsequently died from diphtheria. The fol- 
lowing year he married her cousin. Miss 
Alice M., daughter of Alanson P. Benson, of 
Manlius, N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Claflin have 
two children — Helen H. and Alice L. 




HOMAS HENRY McDONNELL, a 
member of the firm McDonnell & Sons, 
of Ouincy, and the president of the 
Ouincy Quarry Company, was born in this 
town, August 18, 1848, son of Patrick and 
Mary (Hughes) McDonnell. The father was 
born June 12, 18 17, in the County Roscom- 
mon, Ireland. Leaving his native land in 
1834, he came to this country, taking up his 
residence in Dorchester, Mass. Here he 
worked in a tannery for two or three years. 
Then he came to Ouincy, where he served an 
apprenticeship at the trade of a stone-cutter, 
and subsequently followed that trade for sev- 
eral years. In 1857 he embarked in the gran- 
ite business on his own account, manufactur- 
ing monumental and cemetery work of all 
descriptions for the wholesale trade, and meet- 
ing with great success from the first. In 
1871 he enlarged his operations, taking into 



partnenship his two sons, Thomas Henry and 
John O., of whom the latter died in 1894. 
Besides one of the largest and best quarries in 
( )uincy, the firm owns another in Barre, Vt., 
which produces a fine quality of granite, of a 
lighter shade than the Quincy granite, and 
especially adapted for building vaults, mauso- 
leums, and that class of structures, as it is 
comparatively easy to work, and can be quar- 
ried in blocks of almost any size. The value 
of the Ouincy granite, which takes and holds 
a higher polish than any other yet discovered, 
has been known for more than half a century, 
and still leads all others in popularity. Mc- 
Donnell & Sons have large yards in Buffalo 
and Chictawauga, Erie County, N.Y. , and at 
West Seneca, in the same State; and they 
keep an agent and office at Indianapolis, Ind., 
and an agent at Geneva, N.Y. Their trade 
throughout the Union is very large. Many 
monuments and mausoleums from their works 
may be seen in the principal cemeteries of 
New York, Indiana, and other States. They 
have also a high reputation as architects and 
builders, their designs being artistic and well 
executed. Having started in business on a 
modest scale, they are now obliged to keep 
about one hundred and fifty men constantly 
employed to meet the demands of their pa- 
trons. They were the first firm in Ouincy to 
adopt the apparatus of the American Pneu- 
matic Tool Company for carving and cutting 
stone. 

After attending the public schools of 
Ouincy, Thomas Henry McDonnell took a 
business course at Comer's Commercial Col- 
lege in Boston. He then learned the stone- 
cutter's trade in his father's sheds, where he 
worked until of age. At this time he was 
taken into partnership by his father and 
brother, since which event he has been an im- 
portant factor in extending the business and 
placing the firm in its present conspicuous po- 
sition. He was one of the organizers of the 
Ouincy Quarry Company, and has since been 
its president. He has also been a director of 
the Quincy & Boston Street Railway Com- 
pany since its organization, and of the 
Ouincy, Braintree & Holbrook Street Rail- 
way; and he is largely interested in real 
estate in various parts of the country, bejng 



lilOC.KAl'IIICAI, REVIKW 



a member of President Hill and Cranch Hill 
Land Companies. As a member of the firm 
of McDonnell & Sons, he has an interest in a 
large dairy farm of five hundred acres in 
Springfield, N.Y., on the Rochester, Buffalo 
& Pittsburg Railroad, where a fine grade of 
petroleum has been struck, and in other 
real estate in the immediate vicinity of J-iuf- 
falo, N.Y. 

Mr. McDonnell has fellowship in the order 
of the Knights of Columbus and that of the 
Royal Arcanum. In 1892, accompanied by 
his friend, the Rev. T. J. Danahy, he enjoyed 
a PLuropean trip, and while in Rome, together 
with his clerical friend, was accorded the 
great and rare privilege of a private audience 
with the Holy Father, Pope Leo XTII. 



0SP:PH HARDING, a skilled tool- 
maker, who has resided in Medfield 
since he gave up active business five 
years ago, was born in what is now Mil- 
lis, Norfolk County, Mass., August 24, 1821. 
His parents were Theophilus and Mary (Hard- 
ing) Harding, the father a son of Theodore 
Harding, and the mother a daughter of Steven 
Harding. 

Theophilus Harding followed farming, and 
always resided in Millis. He was twice mar- 
ried, first to Abigail Clark, of Medfield, who 
bore him five children, all now deceased, 
namely: Clark; Betsy, who was the wife of 
John Cook, also deceased, a tanner and 
butcher; Julia, wife of Orrin Pratt, who was 
a shoemaker; Theodore, who lived for a time 
on the old homestead, and also in Medfield; 
and Abigail, who was twice married, her first 
husband being Adin Partridge, and her sec- 
ond, Captain Henry, now in Philadelphia. 
After the death of his first wife, Abigail, 
Theophilus Harding married Mrs. Mary 
Harding Atwell, a widow, who was horn in 
Millis. He died in P"ebruary, 1843, and she 
in April, 1873. I-'our children were the fruit 
of this second union; namely, Joseph, Eliza, 
Alfred, and Moses. Eliza, born May 15, 
1823, now wife of L. M. Richards, residing 
in Medfield, has had five children, as follows: 
Mary F., Addison, and Emma, who have 
passed away; Ella Maria, wife of William 



Crane; Emma L., wife of I^. M. Bent, a coal 
dealer. Alfred, born in 1827, is employed in 
a hotel in P'o-xboro. Moses (deceased), was 
in the Civil War. He married Abbic .Seavey. 

Josei)h Harding, the eldest child of The- 
ophilus and Mary Harding, was given with the 
other children a practical common-school edu- 
cation. At the age of sixteen he learned the 
trade of a gunsmith, at which he worked a few 
years. He then turned his attention to the 
making of watch tools, gun tools, and tools 
for the manufacture of tinware. He engaged 
in the tool manufacturing business in Sher- 
born, Lowell, Waltham, and Sj^ringfield, and 
again in Waltham. Going to Chicago in 
1869, he worked for twenty years in a tin 
manufacturing shop in that city and for some 
time at Elgin, 111., in a watch factory. He 
came to Medfield in 1892, and built a new 
house on Adams Avenue, his present home, 
where Mrs. Ella M. Crane and her husband 
are living with him. For several years Mr. 
Harding has not been engaged in business. 

On June 23, 1846, he married Miss Eliza 
M. Bacon, of Millis. She was born in 1823, 
and was a daughter of William and Melinda 
Bacon, both now deceased. Her father was a 
church bell maker. Mrs. Harding died in 
Chicago, 111., April i, 1884, at sixty years of 
age. 

Mr. Harding cast his first Presidential vote 
for Franklin Pierce, but since then he has 
been a Republican. Although a popular and 
successful man, he has never accepted official 
honors. 




LIVER H. CLIFFORD, who is well 
remembered by the older residents of 
Medfield, was a native of Brookfield 
Vt., born January 18, i8og, son of 
Samuel and Betsy (Hamlin) Clifford. 

Samuel Clifford, who was born in Boscawen, 
N. H., was a schoolmate of Daniel Webster. 
Betsy Hamlin, whom he married in Brook- 
field, Vt., was born in that town. May 6, 
1780, a daughter of Oliver and Rachel (Cleve- 
land) Hamlin. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Clifford 
had eight children, of whom three are living, 
namely: William T.. in Ware, Mass.; Sam- 
uel, Jr., in Eugene City, Ore.: and L-prenn, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



now Mrs. Dean, of Waltham, Mass. The 
father died in Fisherville, Vt., after a life 
of usefulness spent as a farmer and school 
teacher. 

Oliver Clifford was educated in the common 
schools of Danbury, N.H. At the age of 
twenty one he came to Medfield, Mass., and 
engaged in farming here and in Millis, return- 
ing to Medfield in 1868, after which he lived 
in retirement in the village until his death on 
June 8, 1893. 

On September 29, 1838, Mr. Clifford mar- 
ried Miss Elizabeth Mason, who was born in 
Princeton, Mass., January 20, 18 16, daughter 
of Joseph and Sallie (Foster) Mason. Her 
father was a farmer, and always lived in 
Princeton. Mr. and Mrs. Clifford had four 
children, namely: Joseph C, who was born 
September 10, 1839, and died November 12, 
1 89 1, and whose widow, formerly Mary E. 
Conders, now lives in Allentown, Pa. ; Al- 
fred, born p-ebruary 11, 1845, who married 
Mary F". Morton, lives in St. Louis, Mo., and 
is secretary of the Consolidated Steel Ware 
Company; Ellen, born March 7, 1846, who 
for several years was a teacher in Medfield 
and Needham, has also served on the School 
Committee, and now lives with her mother on 
the homestead; and Sarah Elizabeth, born 
May I, 1854, who married George F. Twitch- 
ell, an engineer in the straw shop, and lived 
in Medfield till her death, December 15, 
1883. 



IMOTHY SMITH, a well-known and 
highly esteemed citizen of Dedham, 
Mass., was born P'ebruary 12, 1821, in 
Stoughton, Mass., and is the representative of 
one of the earliest families settled in that old 
Norfolk County town, which was the birth- 
place of his great-great-grandfather, Jesse 
Smith, his great-grandfather, his grandfather, 
Joseph Smith, Sr. , and his father, Joseph, Jr. 
Joseph Smith, Sr., was one of the leading 
farmers of the town, and acquired a large 
amount of real estate. To him and his wife, 
whose maiden name was Rhoda Morris, seven 
children were born; namely, Joseph, Jr., Na- 
than, Ebcnezer, Luther, Calvin, Timothy, 
and Ruth. As these children settled in life, 



he gave to each of them a farm. Grandfather 
Smith lived to the age of seventy years, being 
a vigorous and hearty man until the last. 

Joseph .Smith, Jr., was reared as a tiller of 
the soil, receiving a common-school education. 
Marrying soon after he attained his majority, 
he continued industriously and successfully 
engaged in agricultural labors until his death, 
at the age of si.\ty-one years. A man of ster- 
ling integrity, he was highly respected. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Susan R. 
White, was born and bred in P3aston, being 
one of the three children of her parents. She 
survived her husband, living to the age of 
sixty-three years. Of their si.x children two 
are yet living, namely: Joan, the widow of 
Willard Corbett, of Dedham; and Timothy, 
the special subject of this sketch. Both par- 
ents were attendants of the Methodist church. 

Timothy Smith spent the years of his 
childhood and youth on the home farm, ob- 
taining the rudiments of his education at the 
Pierce School, which he attended four years. 
He subsequently pursued his studies in the 
district school of West Stoughton and later 
in one of the Canton schools. When but 
twelve years old he entered the Messenger 
Mills at Canton, in order to learn the trade of 
making cotton cloth, including shirting and 
sheeting, which were there manufactured". 
Beginning at the lowest position, he gradually 
worked his way through every department of 
the factory, being enabled before many years 
to superintend the entire process of convert- 
ing a bale of raw cotton into cloth; and when 
but eighteen years old he was given charge of 
the spinning and weaving rooms, with their 
thirty employees. In 1840 this mill was 
burned; and Mr. Smith accepted a similar 
position in a newly erected mill at Newton, 
remaining there until some time during the 
next year, when he went to Franklin City 
Mills, to engage with P'reeman Fisher, who 
had previously been in business with Mr. 
Messenger. After serving as overseer of the 
spinning and weaving department five years, 
he was made superintendent of the mills, and 
with its eighty looms turned out thousands of 
yards of cloth daily for a number of years. 
When the company drew off their pond for the 
New York & New England Railway Coid- 




JOHN O. A. FIELD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"5 



pany, 



Smith went to Lewiston, Me., to 



set up machinery in a new mill, being gone 
six months. On his return to Franklin he 
acted as agent for a company for eight years, 
and then in partnership with Timothy Kaley 
began the manufacture of knitting cotton on 
his own account in Canton, Mass. Five years 
later Mr. Smith sold his interest in the Can- 
ton mill, and, going to New Orleans, set up 
machinery in a new mill. He remained 
there until he saw everything in good run- 
ning order, returning North just before the 
firing on F'ort Sumter. During the succeed- 
ing three years Mr. Smith worked as an over- 
seer for Mr. Taft at the Norfolk Mills in 
Dedham: and, when these mills were pur- 
chased by the Merchants' Woollen Company, 
he was placed in charge of a gang of night 
workmen as overseer. After the war he re- 
signed his position to engage in the manu- 
facture of spring beds, a business which he 
carried on successfully for a number of years. 
In his present vocation, that of undertaking, 
he has been engaged since 1875, when he was 
appointed undertaker for the town. He is 
the oldest undertaker in point of service of 
any in this locality, and carries on a large 
business, with the aid of his son-in-law, under 
the firm name of Smith & Higgins. He has 
a host of friends throughout the community, 
and does work for all classes of people, irre- 
spective of church afifiliations. He manufact- 
ures the most of his coffins, keeping several 
hands constantly employed. 

Mr. Smith was married in 1842 to Miss 
Emily Hamilton, who was born in Scituate, 
Mass., a daughter of Leonard and Ruth 
(Morris) Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton was born 
and reared in Brookfield, Mass.; but after his 
marriage he settled in Scituate, where his 
death occurred when he was but forty-si.x years 
old. Mrs. Smith bore her husband six chil- 
dren, of whom the following is a brief record: 
George E., the first-born, died May 31, 1844, 
aged fifteen months; Georgianna, born May 
19, 1845, tlied October 29, 1862; Emeline F., 
born October 23, 1848, died January 2, 1852; 
F" ranees A., born February 19, 1854, is the 
wife of Franklin P. Higgins, and has one 
child, Herbert F. Higgins; Charles .Sumner, 
born May 4, 1857, died January 17, 1858; and 



Clara K., i)orn November 12, 1867, died July 
II, 1868. On November 22, 1894, after 
more than half a century of happy wedlock, 
Mrs. Smith passed to the life immortal. 

In politics Mr. Smith is a steadfast Repub- 
lican. He is a F'ree Mason, belonging to 
Constellation Lodge of Dedham. Mr. Smith 
and his daughter and her husband are members 
of the Baptist church. 



§OHN O. A. FIF:LD, the senior mem- 
ber (^f the firm Field & Wild, of 
Quincy, quarrymen and dealers in 
building and monumental granite, was 
born here, January 4, 1835. His great-grand- 
parents, Joseph and Abigail (Newcomb) Field, 
spent their lives here; and their son, Joseph 
Field, who married Relief Baxter, was also a 
lifelong resident of this town. Harvey Field, 
the father of the subject of this sketch, for 
many years was one of the most prominent and 
influential men in Quincy, and a promoter of 
many of its most beneficial enterprises. A 
more extended account of him will be found in 
the biography of George H. F'ield. 

John O. A. F'ield was bred and educated in 
Quincy. As soon as he was old enough he 
took charge of one of his father's farms, on 
which was a large dairy. He subsequently es- 
tablished a milk route in Quincy, and con- 
ducted it for nearly forty years, having a very 
lucrative patronage. Besides this, from 1855 
to i860 he dealt in paving-stones; and he did 
a good deal of heavy teaming in this locality. 
During the Civil War he was a superintendent 
of cavalry horses for the government in Read- 
ville and Boston. He abandoned his team- 
ing business in 1870, when elected High- 
way Surveyor, a position which he filled for 
two years. He afterward served as Selectman 
of Quincy for five years, and in 1876 was the 
chairman of the board. He had been Special 
Commissioner of Norfolk County nine years 
when, in 1S84, he was elected Regular Com- 
missioner, in which capacity he served for five 
years. In 1884 Mr. F'ield formed a copartner- 
ship with Frank M. Wild, and succeeding to 
the business established by the late John 
Q. A. Wild, the father of FVank M., became 
senior member of the present firm of Field & 



ii6 



BIOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



Wild. The firm owns one of the largest quar- 
ries ill this section of New England, executes 
monumental and cemetery work of all kinds, 
and employs a large number of men. It often 
furnishes granite for building material. The 
stone for the recent addition to the Dedham 
court-house was obtained at Dover quarry, 
owned by Mr. Field. For the past fifteen 
years Mr. Field has been a member of the In- 
vestment Committee of the Ouincy Savings 
Bank. Also, for four years he was the presi- 
dent of the Granite Manufacturers' Association 
of New England, which included si.x New Eng- 
land States and New York City. Another of 
his occupations has been the settlement of 
many estates in this vicinity, some of which 
involved large sums of money. 

Mr. Field belongs to Mount Wollaston 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; to the Knights of 
Pythias, the Knights of Honor, and the 
Granite City Club. Politically, he is a Re- 
publican, and in 1896 and 1897 was elected 
Councilman-at-large. He was married No- 
vember 28, 1858, to Sylvia Carol.ine Welling- 
ton, daughter of Elbridge Wellington, a na- 
tive of Concord, Mass., who afterward became 
a resident of New Orleans. Of their five chil- 
dren, four are living — John VV., Georgiana, 
Harvey Adams, and Jennie Kartlett. Geor- 
giana is the wife of D. P'rederick Potter, of 
Buffalo, N. Y. ; and Plarvey Adams is a student 
at the Harvard Medical School, class of i8g8. 
Mr. and Mrs. Field are members of the Adams 
Temple Parish, in which he served as one of 
the Parish Committee from 1872 until 1877; 
and they attend the church connected there- 
with. 



p^EWCOMB B. TOWER, one of the 
leading merchants of Cohasset, was 
born in this town, February 20, 
1848. His parents were Abraham 
H. and Charlotte (Bates) Tower, the former 
of whom was for many years engaged in the 
mackerel fishing industry of this locality, but 
is now deceased. A more extended account of 
Mr. Tower's ancestry may be found in the 
sketch of his brother, Abraham H. Tower, 
which is published elsewhere in this work. 
Ncwcomb B. Tow'cr was educated in the 



public schools of Cohasset, and previous to 
entering mercantile pursuits he assisted his 
father in mackerel fishing. In 1866 he be- 
came associated with his brother, Abraham 
H., in carrying on a general store, coal, lum- 
ber, and building materials being later added 
to their stock in trade. The firm, which is 
known as Tower Brothers & Co., have con- 
ducted a successful business for over thirty 
years, and are widely and favorably known 
along the South Shore. Mr. Tower has been 
a trustee of the Cohasset Savings Bank for the 
past thirty-five years, and takes a deep interest 
in all other institutions established for the ben- 
efit of the community. In politics a Republi- 
can, he ably fulfilled the duties of Town Clerk 
for twenty-five years, was elected to the Board 
of Selectmen in 1895, and is Assessor and 
Overseer of the Poor. 

Mr. Tower married Sophronia L. Parker, of 
this town, by whom he has had five children, 
four of whom are living; namely, George P., 
Ella G., Mary P., and Charlotte S. Ella G. 
is the wife of Edward Nichols, of Cohasset. 

Mr. Tower was formerly organist of the 
First Unitarian Church, of which he is now a 
Deacon. He is also actively interested in the 
Sunday-school. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, and belongs to Konohasset 
Lodge. 




ELA P'RENCH, a venerable and 
highly respected resident of Wey- 
mouth, was born in this town, April 
15, 1818, son of Stephen and Sallie 
(Dyer) P'rench, both also natives of the town. 
His grandfather, Stephen French, Sr. , was 
one of the early settlers of Weymouth. The 
father, who was a farmer and did considerable 
teaming, died in his sixty-eighth year, having 
been prominent in the town and having served 
as Overseer of the Poor. His surviving chil- 
dren are: Bela, the subject of this sketch; 
and Thomas M., who resides in East Wey- 
mouth. 

Bela P"rench grew up on his father's farm. 
His school life ended when he was sixteen 
years of age. Upon reaching his majority he 
entered the employ of the Weymouth Iron 
Company, for whom he did general jobbing for 



II 




JOHN CASHMAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



"9 



a number of years. He subseciuently engaged 
in farming, whicli has been his chief occiipa- 
tiiin since. He owns about fifty acres of land 
in the towns of Weymouth and Ilingham. 
J^'or some time he dealt in wood. 

Mr. French has been twice married. On 
the first occasion he was united to Mary A. 
Washburn, of Plympton, who bore him one 
son, now deceased. The second marriage was 
contracted with Lucy E. , daughter of Jacob 
Lovell, of Weymouth. She is the mother of 
Bela French, ■ of the firm of French & Mer- 
chant, dry-goods merchants at East Weymouth. 
There is one grandchild, Lucy A. French. 
Mr. French, Sr. , has been a trustee of the 
East Weymouth Savings Bank since it was 
organized. He is an active member and a 
trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church of 
East Weymouth. Public-spirited and gener- 
ous, he is ready to lend his time and influence 
for the furtherance of any worthy object. 
Watching the trend of events in Weymouth, 
he has witnessed many changes and seen many 
improvements. 




jDWIN P. WORSTER, the vice-presi- 
dent of the LTnion National Bank of 
Weymouth, was born August 24, 
1S26, son of Ezekiel and Mary (Bourne) 
Worster. The father, a native of Somers- 
worth, N.LL, at the age of seventeen came to 
Weymouth, and was here engaged in boot and 
shoe making until fifty years of age. Subse- 
quently he took up the coal and wood busi- 
ness, which he had followed for several years 
when ill health compelled him to retire. He 
died in June, i860. His wife was a native of 
Barnstable, Mass. 

Edwin P. Worster went to school in Wey- 
mouth until twelve years of age. Then he 
learned the trade of shoemaker, which he fol- 
lowed until 1844. He ne.xt spent two years 
learning the carpenter's trade in Lowell, 
Mass., after which he returned to Weymouth. 
In 1849 he sailed for California via Cape 
Horn, making the journey in seven months and 
fourteen days. After a short time spent in 
the gold mines and a year in the State of Cal- 
ifornia, he decided to return East, and em- 
barked on a sailing-vessel bound for the Isth- 



mus of Panama. Owing to severe storms and 
calms the ship landed its passengers on the 
coast of Nicaragua, from which place the 
party crossed the country to Crey Town on the 
yXtlantic side. At Chagres Mr. Worster took 
passage on a steamship, and returned home by 
way of New York. After some time spent in 
recruiting his health, which had been imjiaired 
by malarial fever contracted on the Pacific 
Coast, he established himself in the brokerage 
business in Boston. Dealing principally in 
foreign money ant! negotiable paper, and 
negotiating loans, he in time acquired a 
large and profitai)le coiniection. In 1893 lie 
practically retired from business. 

Mr. Worster married Miss Mary J. Metcalf, 
of Petersboro, N.H. Of the five children 
born to them, four survive. These are: li. 
Frank, who is living in New York City; 
Clara A., the wife of P. H. Linton, of Wey- 
mouth ; Charles H., also in Weymouth; and 
Nellie W., the wife of George W., of the 
same place. Mrs. Worster died March 21, 
i8g6. Mr. Worster is a member of the Delta 
Lodge, A. V. & A. M., of Weymouth. He 
is a director and the vice-president of the 
Union National Bank. Taking an earnest 
interest in the affairs of his native town, he is 
always ready to lend his aid for its advance- 
ment. 



OHN CASH MAN, a quarry owner and 
a general contractor of Ouincy, was 
born June 23, 1S49, in County Cork, 
Ireland, son of James Cashman. The 
father came to the country with his family in 
about the middle of the present century, set- 
tling in Hanover, Mass. Here, after learning 
the trade of brickmaker, he became a con- 
tractor and lumber dealer, (^ne of the most 
enterprising men of his time, he built up a 
large business, attained honorable prominence 
in the community, and at different times served 
in several of the minor town offices. He mar- 
ried Catherine Long, a daughter of Dennis 
Long, of the County Cork. Of their ten chil- 
dren, nine grew to maturity. The latter were: 
Hannah, who is the widow of John Connors, 
late of Rockland, Mass. ; Julia, who married 
Daniel Reardon, of Rockland; John, the sub- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ject of this sketch; Dennis J., of whom there 
is no special record ; James, now deceased ; 
Catherine, who married John Mclntyre, of 
Brockton, Mass. ; William, now a resident of 
Oiiincy; Ellen, the wife of James Spence, of 
Rockland, Mass. ; and Luke, residing in New 
York City. 

Although John Cashman's opportunities for 
obtaining a knowledge of books in his early 
years were very limited, yet by close observa- 
tion and intelligent reading he has become 
well informed on general topics, and is a typi- 
cal representative of the self-made men of our 
generation. When a lad of twelve years he 
began driving a team for his father, an occupa- 
tion which he followed for ten years. Coming 
then to Ouincy, he drove a stone team for four 
years, and then established himself as a team- 
ster on his own account. He has done well 
from the outset. For many years he has car- 
ried on the heaviest business of that kind in 
this section of the county, employing about 
thirty horses and nearly twice as man}^ men. 
As a contractor he has been very prosperous. 
Among his more important works have been 
the building of the water-works in Quincy and 
Ipswich, Mass., and of those at Bar Harbor, 
Me. He has also done a vast amount of con- 
tract labor on various railways. In 1885 he 
purchased one of the finest quarries in Ouincy, 
the product of which is a very handsome, rich, 
dark blue stone, much in demand among 
builders. He is also interested in the 
Ouincy Electric Light and Power Company, of 
which he is a director. 

On April 12, 1874, Mr. Cashman married 
Hannah M. Falvey, a daughter of Eugene Fal- 
vey, of Ouincy. They have had eleven chil- 
dren, of whom Adeline, James E. , Mary, 
William, John, Ellen, Beatrice, and Henry 
are living. 



EVERETT HOLBROOK, a represent- 
ative man of the town of Holbrook, was 
born here April 23, 1835, son of 
Eli.sha N. and Relief (Linfield) Holbrook. 
The father, a native of Braintree, was a well- 
known shoe manufacturer of East Randolph 
(now Holbrook), for a half-century, and was 
one of the most succes.sful business men the 



county has produced. The industry of which 
he was the head was one of the important 
factors in the growth and prosperity of East 
Randolph, and it was owing largely to his 
influence that the town was set off as a sepa- 
rate corporation. Desirous of expressing their 
appreciation of his many acts of generosity to 
the town and their recognition of his honor- 
able and upright chaVacter, the residents vol- 
untarily renamed the town Holbrook in his 
honor. In politics he was a Republican, hav- 
ing joined the party at its formation. He was 
previously a Whig. A public-spirited man, 
he was interested not only in the welfare of 
his own town, but in the great questions at 
issue concerning the advancement or welfare 
of the State and of the country at large, having 
clear and decided views in relation to all, and 
being always ready to cast the weight of his 
influence on the side which he believed to be 
the right. He was a devoted member of Win- 
throp Congregational Church and one of its 
most liberal contributors. He donated to the 
town the magnificent sum of fifty thousand 
dollars, a jDart of which was used in building 
the public library. His death occurred on 
F"ebruary 5, 1871. The town named after 
him was incorporated on the 29th of the 
same month. His wife. Relief, was born in 
East Randolph (Holbrook). Two of their 
children are living, namely: Mary W., of 
Holbrook ; and E. Everett, the subject of this 
sketch. 

E. Everett Holbrook grew to manhood in 
East Randolph, receiving his education partly 
in the town and partly at Phillips Andover 
Academy. When about thirty years of age 
he became a partner in business with his 
father, the firm being known as that of E. N. 
Holbrook & Son. Shortly after the death of 
his father Mr. Holbrook retired from the 
manufacturing business. He was a director of 
the former National Bank of Randolph, and he 
is now a director of the Holbrook Co-operative 
National Bank. He was the first Representa- 
tive of Holbrook in the General Court. 
While in the legislature he served on the 
Committee on Mercantile Affairs. 

Mr. Holbrook has been twice married. On 
the first occasion he was united with Mary J. 
Russell, a daughter of the Rev. E. Russell, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



D. D., of Holbrook. She died in iS86, the 
mother of two children, namely: Jennie L., 
now the wife of Edward N. Waterman, of Al- 
bany, N. Y. ; and Mary S., living at Holbrook. 
The second marriage was contracted in I-"ebrii- 
ary, 1889, with Mrs. Isabel N. Dana, of Mil- 
waukee, Wis. Like his father, Mr. Holbrook 
is an active member of Winthrop Congrega- 
tional Church, and was for two years the 
superintendent of its Sunday-school. He is a 
man of extensive information and a keen 
judge of human nature. He has travelled in 
Europe and in the United States, and has 
spent several winters in the South. Mr. Hol- 
brook's house, surrounded by lawn and shrub- 
bery, is one of the most attractive features of 
the town. 



Tt^UFUS A. THAYER, of Randolph, a 
I "^^ former representative of the Seventh 
Xfe\ ^Vard, Norfolk District, in the 
^""^ General Court, was born in Ran- 
dolph, December 3, 1839. ^ son of Rufus 
Thayer, he is a descendant of Richard Thayer, 
of Boston, who, with two brothers, came to 
this country from England in 1640. The 
father was a Republican in politics and a very 
public-spirited man, being especially inter- 
ested and active in school matters. He gave 
a portion of his farm as a site for a school 
building, upon which the district' school- 
house, No. 5, now stands. He married Mar- 
gery A. White, a native of Braintree and a 
daughter of Captain Calvin White, of Brain- 
tree. His death occurred in 1863. Of his 
children, the other survivors are: Charles M., 
of the firm W. T. Piper & Co., manufacturers 
of vinegar, 124 Broad Street, Boston; and S. 
Austin, a dealer in coal, grain, hay, and lum- 
ber at Randolph. 

In his youth, while also busy at farm work, 
Rufus A. Thayer attended the public schools 
of Randolph, Hollis Institute at South Brain- 
tree, and Pierce Academy at Middleboro, 
Mass., finishing his education with a business 
course at Comer's Commercial College in Bos- 
ton. At his father's death the charge of the 
property and the guardianship of his younger 
brothers and sisters devolved upon him. Ac- 
tive in local politics for a prolonged period, he 



served on the Board of Selectmen many years, 
and has officiated as chairman of the Council. 
In 1888 and 1889 he was the Seventh Ward's 
Representative in the State legislature, serv- 
ing in 1 888 on the Committee of County Es- 
timates and Ta.xation, and as clerk of the 
Committee on Ta.xation, and in 1889 as the 
chairman of the Committee on Public Chari- 
table Institutions. 

Mr. Thayer married Isadore Arnold, of 
Braintree, and has two daughters. The latter 
are: Flora A. and Mabel K., both graduates 
of Thayer Academy, of Braintree. Mr. 
Thayer was instrumental in the building of 
the Randolph Street Railway, and is a director 
and the clerk of the corporation owning it. 
He is a man of position and influence in the 
community, and is at all times interested in 
the growth of the town. 



-J^EWTON WHITE, formerly a well- 
known boot and shoe manufacturer of 
Holbrook, was born in ICast Ran- 
dolph (now Holbrook), December 
2y, 1815. He was a son of Captain Thomas 
and Meriel (Burr) White, and a brother of Ed- 
mund White, a biography of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. Captain Thomas 
White followed his trade of stone-cutter in 
early manhood and the calling of farmer in his 
later years. 

Newton White was reared on the farm, and 
acquired a limited education in the schools 
near his home. He had not the advantages 
afforded young men of the present day, but his 
natural ability and intelligence made up for 
his lack of mental training. For a short time 
he manufactured shoes in company with Na- 
thaniel Sprague, and for a number of years 
after he was engaged in the same business 
without a partner. As a business man he was 
very successful ; and he was very popular with 
his emjDloyees and with all with whom he was 
associated. 

Mr. Holbrook was twice married. His 
first wife, whose maiden name was Rhoda 
White, bore him four daughters, namely: 
Rhoda R., of whom there is no special record; 
Ruth, now the wife of David Forrest; Mary 
B. , the wife of Frank Lewis; and Lizzie, now 



122 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



deceased. His second niarriiige was contracted 
in 1880 with Mary A., daughter of the late 
Lutl^er White. Mr. White was a prominent 
Republican. During the session of 1877 he 
represented Holbrook and Braintree in the 
State legislature, and for a number of years he 
was a Selectman of Holbrook. A public- 
spirited man, he was actively interested in the 
progress of the town. He was Deacon in the 
Winthrop Congregational Church for over a 
quarter of a century, and the superintendent of 
the Sunday-school for a number of years. 
Mr. White was an upright and conscientious 
man, a kind father and husband, and an oblig- 
ing neighbor. He died November 15, 1882. 
His widow and eldest daughter still reside in 
the handsome residence at the corner of 
Franklin and Adams Streets in Holbrook, 
where he made his home in the latter part of 
his life. 



■EREMIAH CREHORE, for many years 
an honored and respected citizen of 
Dedham, Norfolk County, Mass., was 
born in Dorchester, Suffolk County, 
December ig, 1795, a son of John S. Crehore. 
He was of Colonial stock and, on the paternal 
side, of Irish extraction, his emigrant progen- 
itor, Teague Crehore, having come from Ire- 
land to Massachusetts between 1640 and 1650, 
and settled in the town of Milton, this county. 
An account of him and of his immediate de- 
scendants is given in Teele's History of Mil- 
ton, in the chapter devoted to noted men and 
women and early families. His sons and 
grandsons became prominently identified with 
the interests of that section of the county, and 
some of their posterity were residents of Mil- 
ton until within a very few years. They were 
principally engaged in agricultural pursuits, 
although they vvere noted for their mechanical 
skill and ingenuity, one member of a former 
generation being the first manufacturer of ar- 
tificial limbs, as well as of the first piano and 
the first violin made in the United States. 

John -S. Crehore was born on the old home- 
stead in Milton in 1761, and died January 7, 



18- 



Dedham, whither he had removed 



with his family in i 828. 
learned the trade of ; 



In early manhood he 
cliair manufacturer, 



which he carried (jn in addition to farming 
during the greater part of his life. He was 
held in much esteem as a man and as a citizen. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Hannah 
Lyon, was a daughter of I-llhanan Lyon, oi 
Stoughton. She was born in that town, April 
5, 1765, and died in Dedham at the advanced 
age of eighty-six years, having reared six chil- 
dren. Both she and her husband were attend- 
ants of the Congregational church. 

Jeremiah Crehore was brought up on a farm, 
but devoted a good deal of his time to mechan- 
ical pursuits, having a natural aptitude for that 
work, and enjoying a wide reputation as a 
skilled mechanic. He had his workshop on 
his farm, and it is safe to say spent far more 
days at the bench than in tilling the S(jil. 
He was very ingenious, and among other 
works which brought him fame was the placing 
of the wires on cylinders to produce the fine 
lines in writing-paper. In 1844 he removed 
to the village of Dedham, where he spent his 
remaining years, dying May 23, 1876, at the 
age of eighty years and five months. He mar- 
ried Miss Joan Dunbar, who was born in 
Charlton, Worcester County, Mass., a daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Sarah Dunbar. Her grand- 
father, Elijah Dunbar, was born in Canton, 
Mass., where his father, the Rev. Samuel 
Dunbar (Harvard College, 1723), was a settled 
minister for fifty years. (A very interesting 
sketch of him appears in the History of Can- 
ton.) Elijah Dunbar was a Justice of the 
Peace, being known as Esquire Dunbar; and 
in that capacity he did a great deal of town 
work, and was very prominent in local affairs. 
Mrs. Crehore was one of a family of twelve 
children, and was herself the mother of three, 
two of whom are now living; namely, Ellen 
H. and Augusta. The other, a daughter Mar- 
tha, died aged two and a half years. Mrs. Cre- 
hore survived her husliand, attaining the age 
of eighty-seven years. Both were active mem- 
bers of the Unitarian church, Mr. Crehore 
having been Deacon of the church of that de- 
nomination in Milton until his removal to 
Dedham. 

The two daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Crehore 
vvere born in Milton, but were bred and edu- 
cated in Dedham, being students in the high 
school. Miss Ellen H. Crehore began teach- 



BIOGRAI'HICAL REVIEW 



123 



ing when but seventeen years old, and after- 
ward pursued the higher branches of education 
at a private school in l^oston. Resuming her 
former occupation, she taught for a time in 
Uedhain, being subsequently a teacher in 
Dorchester nine years, and later in Dedham. 
She has ever taken an active and prominent 
jiart in advancing the educational interests of 
Dedham, for six years serving faithfully as a 
member of the School Committee. 

Miss Augusta Crehore completed her studies 
at a select school in Roxbury, and afterward 
fur a short time taught a private school in 
Dedham. Since the death of their parents, 
the sisters have lived together in Dedham, 
their home being a pleasant and attractive 
one. Both are active in social circles. They 
are members of the Unitarian church and of 
the Women's Christian Temperance Union, 
Ellen H. being also a member of the Dedham 
Historical Society. 



§OHN K. Wn.LARD, a leading business 
man of Randolph, was born in Win- 
chester, N. H., January 20, 1855, son 
of .Samuel W. and Mary A. (Bryant) 
Willard. Me is of Scotch descent on the 
paternal side. II is maternal grandfather, 
Paul Butler, was a soldier and an officer in 
the Revolutionary War. His father, who 
engaged in the manufacture of tripe immedi- 
ately after locating here, and subsequently 
followed this industry for several years, retired 
from business some time previous to his de- 
mise, in F'ebruary, i8g6. 

When five years of age John K. Willard 
was brought by his parents to Randolph, where 
he attended the grammar and high schools. 
His education was completed at Philliiis 
Academy at Andover, Mass. He became 
associated with his father at the age of twenty- 
four. In 1884, when the latter retired, he 
went into partnership with L. S. Woodward, 
of Rhode Island. One year later Mr. Wood- 
ward withdrew, and since that time Mr. Wil- 
lard has conducted the business alone. In 
1S86 he added the rendering of tallow to the 
preparation of tripe and pigs' feet. He now 
carries on a large wholesale business in this 
class of goods. 



Mr. Willard married Grace I'. Wild, a 
daughter of Daniel Wild, of Randoljih, and 
has three sons — Robert H., Roger B., and 
John R. He is both a Mason and an Odd 
l'"elUnv, and a member of the Young Men's 
Mutual Relief Association of Randolph, and an 
attendant of the Baptist church. In jiolitics 
he is a Democrat; and he has been one of the 
Selectmen of Randoliih foi' the past six years, 
serving as chairman of the board during the 
current year. In the fall of 1896 he was the 
Democratic candidate for Representative of 
the Seventh Ward, Norfolk District, but was 
defeated by his opjioncnt, Henry A. Belcher, 
of the same place. However, he is popular in 
the town with both jiarties, and is much es- 
teemed. 




LIHU A. HOL15RO0K, a prominent 
resident of Holbrook, is a native of 
Braintree, Mass. Born on Decem- 
ber 2T,, 1825, son of Samuel L. and Susanna 
D. (Adams) Holbrook, he comes of an old 
Braintree family, which is said to be of 
Scotch origin. Joseph Holbrcjok, his grand- 
father, was a son of Colonel John Holbrook, 
of Braintree. His father, Samuel L. Hol- 
brook, was born in Braintree, and resided there 
throughout his life, engaged in farming. His 
mother, Susanna, was descended from the 
famous Adams family, to which the American 
Presidents of that name belonged. Jesse 
Reed, who worked for John Adams, the grand- 
father of Elihu Holbrook, in 181 5 trans- 
planted to .South iManklin Street the beauti- 
ful elm-tree standing near Mr. Holbrook's 
residence, regarded as one of the landmarks of 
the town and said to be one of the largest 
trees in the State. Mrs. Susanna D. Hol- 
brook, who was then a girl, assisted in the 
transplanting. 

Elihu A. Holbrook grew to manhood in 
Braintree, and was educated in the public 
schools of that town. When about eighteen 
years old, he began shoemaking. This trade 
he afterward followed as a journeyman until 
i860, in which year he began to manufacture 
boots on his own account in East Randolph, 
now known as Holbrook, in ])artnership with 
Danforth Thayer, undei- the firm name of 



124 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Thayer & Holbiuok . The firm generally 
employed from twenty-five to thirty hands, 
and was in business for fifteen years. After 
Mr. Thayer's death it was merged in that of 
E. A. Holbrook & Co. The latter firm had 
carried on business for a number of years with 
Mr. Holbrook at its head when it dissolved 
and the senior partner retired from manufact- 
uring. 

Mr. Holbrook married Annie M. White, a 
daughter of Isaac W. White, of Holbrook. 
She bore him two children — John A. and 
Annie M. A second marriage subsequently 
united him to Ro.xie E. Dickinson, of Am- 
herst, Mass. Mr. Holbrook is a Republican 
in politics. He is now serving his second 
term as a member of the Board of Assessors. 
He was one of the Building Committee that 
superintended the erection of the present 
town hall of Holbrook; and he has occupied 
various positions of honor and trust in the 
town. As a citizen he is known to have at 
heart the welfare of the community and to act 
always for the public interest. 




iEV. WILLIAM ORNE WHITE, of 
Brookline, retired, after many years 
of faithful service in the ministry of 
the Unitarian body of the Congre- 
gational church, was born in Salem, Mass., 
February 12, 1821. His parents were the 
Hon. Daniel A. and Eliza (Orne) White. 

The founder of the family, William White, 
came from England to this country over two 
hundred and fifty years ago (tradition says 
from Norfolk County), locating in Haverhill, 
Mass., in 1642. The Rev. Mr. White's 
grandfather, John White, who was a native of 
Haverhill, was engaged in farming during 
the greater part of his life, in Methuen. He 
died there in 1800, aged eighty years. 

Daniel A. White, son of John, was born in 
Methuen, June 7, 1776, and grew to manhood 
on the farm. Graduating from Harvard Col- 
lege in 1797, after studying law in Salem he 
was admitted to the bar, and began practice in 
Newburyport. He subsequently moved to 
Salem, where he acted as Judge of Probate for 
thirty-eight years, resigning in 1853, at the 
age of seventy-seven. He was first married 



May 24, 1807, to Mrs. Mary Van Schalkwyck, 
daughter of Dr. Josiah Wilder, of Lancaster, 
Mass. Two daughters born of this union 
grew up, and were married. His wife, Mary, 
died June 29, 181 i; and eight years later, on 
August I, 1819, Judge White married Mrs. 
Eliza Wctmore, widow of William Wetmore 
and daughter of William Orne, a merchant 
of Salem. The fruit of this marriage was 
one son, William, subject of this sketch, 
named for his grandfather Orne. Mrs. Eliza 
White died in her thirty-seventh year, March 
27, 1821; and the Judge married on January 
22, 1824, Mrs. Ruth Rogers, daughter of 
Joseph Hurd, a merchant of Charlestown, 
Mass. One son born of this union grew to 
maturity, and was married. The father, the 
Hon. Daniel A. White, died March 30, 1861, 
in his eighty-fifth year. His third wife, out- 
living him, attained the age of ninety years, 
her death occurring in November, 1874. The 
family record includes a long list of grand- 
children and great-grandchildren sprung from 
the first and third marriages. Judge White 
was the author of a work entitled "New Eng- 
land Congregationalism," also of eulogies on 
Nathaniel Bowditch and John Pickering, and 
of other public addresses that appeared in 
print. He was one of the leading members of 
the First Church of Salem, his wife, Eliza, 
also being connected therewith. 

William Orne White acquired his element- 
ary education in the public and private schools 
of Salem, and prepared for college at Phillips 
Exeter Academy. Graduating from Harvard 
in 1840, after two years of voyaging and for- 
eign travel for his health, he entered the Di- 
vinity School at Cambridge, pursued the regu- 
lar course of study, and was graduated in 
1845. Fo"" fivs months he supplied the pulpit 
of the Unitarian church at Eastport, Me.; and 
in 1846-47, in its pastor's absence, he had 
charge of the Unitarian church in St. Louis. 
He was ordained in West Newton, November 
22, 1848. From that time until January i, 
1851, he preached in West Newton ; and for 
twenty-seven years, from October i, 185 1, to 
November 3. 1878, he was settled in Keene, 
N. H. Resigning his pastorate in Keene, he 
supplied different pulpits for a time, and 
preached for the First Congregational Society 




^ 




M 

m. 



El'HRAIM H. DOANE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1 27 



of Sharon, in this county, for two years, from 
September, 18S1, to September, 1883. 

Several of Mr. White's discourses have 
been published. Among them maybe named: 
"Our Struggle Rigiiteous in the Sight of 
God," delivered in Keene, April 13, 1862, 
"on the day of thanksgiving for the nation's 
victories"; an address at Keene, September 
18, 1863, delivered at the funeral of the Rev. 
George G. Ingersoll; a sermon preached to 
the "Keene Congregational Society," Septem- 
ber 29, 1867, "previous to the enlarging and 
remodelling of their house of worship"; an 
historical address, July 4, 1876, delivered in 
Keene, N.H., by request of the city govern- 
ment; farewell sermon at Keene, November 
3, 1878; and an address at the dedication of 
a mural monument to the memory of the 
Rev. Dr. James Walker, ex-president of Har- 
vard University, delivered in Harvard Church, 
Charlestown, Mass., January 14, 1883. In 
September, 1881, Mr. White removed to his 
present residence in Brookline. 

He was married on September 25, 1848, to 
Margaret E., a daughter of the late Chester 
Harding, the artist, whose home was in 
Springfield, Mass. Mrs. White was born in 
Barre, N.Y. She is the mother of two chil- 
dren: Daniel Appleton, who died in infancy 
in 1S59: and Eliza Orne White, born August 
2, 1856, author of "Miss Brooks," "Winter- 
borough," "The Coming of Theodora," "When 
Molly was Six," "A Little Girl of Long 
Ago," "A Browning Courtship and Other 
Stories." 

The Rev. Mr. White favors the Republican 
side in politics. He served on the School 
Committee of Keene, and was a trustee of 
Keene Academy, president of the Cheshire 
County Washingtonian Total Abstinence So- 
ciety, and one of the trustees of the Orphans' 
Home in Franklin, N. H. Mr. and Mrs. 
White are life members of the American Uni- 
tarian Association. 



lAPT. EPHRAIM HARVEY DOANE. 
superintendent of the Sailors' Snug 
Harbor, a home for disabled seamen 
at Germantown, Quincy, Mass., is 
well fitted for the position by birth, breeding, 




and experience. Son of Ephraim Doane, Jr., 
he was born December 28, 1844, in Harwich, 
Mass., where his ancestors had been residents 
for several generations. His grandfather, 
Ephraim, .Sr. , son of .Simeon Doane, one of 
the numerous descendants of Deacon John 
Doane, of Plymouth, 1630, and later of East- 
ham, Cape Cod, Mass., was engaged in seafar- . 
ing pursuits when a young man as captain 
of a vessel. On retiring to land service, he 
opened a store of general merchandise in his 
native town, Harwich, and in connection with 
it had charge of the post-office there for many 
years. 

Ephraim Doane, Jr., son of Plphraim, Sr., 
was born in Harwich in 181 7. Like most 
boys reared on the coast, he early imbibed a 
love for the sea, and at the age of ten years 
was employed as a cook on board a coaster. 
From that time on for many a year he led a 
seafaring life, becoming while yet a very 
young man master of a vessel. lie was en- 
gaged in fishing and coastwise sailing until 
1875, when he abandoned the sea to become 
superintendent of the Sailors' Snug Harbor in 
Quincy. After a continuous service of eight 
years in that capacity, he returned to his an- 
cestral home in Harwich, where he is living 
retired from active labor, a hale and vigorous 
man for one of his advanced years. His wife 
was Priscilla Ellis, a daughter of Thomas 
Ellis, of Harwich. Of their six children, 
three grew to years of maturity, as follows: 
Emily, wife of Milton Kelley, of Dennis, 
Mass. ; I^phraim Harvey; and Minnie, wife of 
Edgar Thomas, of Dorchester, Mass. The 
parents early united with the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and have faithfully followed its 
teachings. 

Ephraim Harvey Doane left school at the 
age of twelve years to follow in the footsteps 
of his father, whom he then accompanied on 
a coasting trip as cook. He continued going 
to sea upward of a quarter of a century, being 
employed in various minor capacities until 
about twenty years old, when he was made 
captain of a schooner, and subsequently en- 
gaged in the coasting business a number of 
years, the latter part of the time turning his 
attention to yachting. In 18S5 Captain 
Doane was appointed superintendent of the 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Sailors' Snug Harbor, a model institution of 
its kind, where he has now the care of about 
forty men, who a])preciate to the highest 
degree his efforts to make their lives home- 
like and pleasant. Fraternally, he is a mem- 
ber of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company of I5oston. 

In 1863 Captain Doane married Harriet H., 
daughter of Josiah Doane, of Harwich, who, 
although he bears the same surname, is not a 
near kinsman. Two children have been liorn 
to the Captain and Mrs. Doane, naniely : 
Annie, wife of William (Million, of Dennis, 
Mass. ; and Hattie, who died, unmarried, at 
the age of twenty-seven years. 



M 



ANIEL BONNE Y, a venerable and 
honored citizen of Dedham, Mass., 
is living in pleasant retirement from 
active pursuits at his home on East 
Street, near Washington Street, enjoying the 
fruits of his many busy years of toil. He was 
born October 5, 181 1, in Kingston, this State, 
his father, Seth Bonney, being the son of Dan- 
iel Bonney, a lifelong resident of Plymouth 
County. 

Seth Bonney was born in Middleboro. He 
was one of a family of four children, and with 
the others was brought up on the home farm. 
He learned the founder's trade when a young 
man; and this calling he followed winters for 
some years, having charge of a blast furnace in 
Halifax, while in the summer season he made 
a good living at fishing. In 1823 he settled 
in Dedham, where he was engaged in various 
occupations until the time of his removal to 
Irving, where, at the home of one of his sons, 
he passed the last three of his sixty-one years 
of life. His wife, formerly Deborah Weston, 
was born and bred in Plympton, Mass., being 
one of the eight children reared by Deacon 
Weston, a jjrosperous cooper. Mrs. Bonney 
bore her husband five children, of whom Dan- 
iel, the special subject of this sketch, is the 
only one living. The mother passed to the 



higher life 



in 1835, aged fifty-four years. 



Both ])arents were members of the Baptist 
church at Kingston. 

Daniel Bonney attended the common schools 
of Halifax until eleven vears old. when he 



came with his jjarents to Dedham. At the age 
of sixteen he went to Dunstable, N.H., to 
learn the trade of a machinist and blacksmith, 
serving an apprenticeship of three years; and 
he afterward worked at his trade in a machine 
shop in Andover, Mass. In 1833 he returned 
to Dedham, locating in the east part of the 
town, where he built a shop and began the 
manufacture of blind hinges, a profitable in- 
dustry, which he carried on several years. 
Subsecjuently, removing his sho]) to. its present 
locatif)n, near his residence, he enlarged it, 
and in 1868 put in an engine; and from that 
time until his retirement from business, in 
1879, he made a specialty of manufacturing 
burs, washers, and rivets, meeting with grati- 
fying success in his enterprise. 

Mr. Bonney has been twice married. His 
first wife, to whom he was united May 14, 
1.835, was Cordelia C. Coney, who was born 
in Eastport, Me., and was a daughter of Will- 
iam Coney, a native of Dedham. She died at 
the age of fifty-four years, leaving six chil- 
dren, namely: Sarah, wife of Horace Went- 
worth ; Isadora, widow of the late Samuel 
Whitmore; Henry C. , auditor for the Bell 
Telephone Company, whose wife, Florence 
Bridge, died in 1878, having borne him seven 
children, of whom four are living — John, 
Robert, Daniel, and Florence C. ; Delia, 
widow of the late John H. Coudran ; Seth, 
who is married, and has one child, Arthur 
W. ; and Daniel Weston, who married Eva 
M. Wetmore, and has five children — Daniel 
Weston, Samuel Coney, John Henry, Roger, 
and Eunice. After the death of his first wife 
Mr. Bonney married Mrs. Almira S. Gale 
Grover, who was born and reared in New 
Hampshire, where her father, Dudley Gale, 
was engaged in agricultural pursuits through- 
out his life. She had been married twice 
previous to her union with Mr. Bonney, and 
by her first husband, Oliver Holmes, had three 
children — Osmond A., Cora E., and Oliver 
J. Her second husband, Frank D. Grover, to 
whom she was married in 1863, died in 1866. 

Mr. Bonney is a man of keen intelligence 
and forethought, keeping well informed as to 
current events, and is now, as in his earlier 
years, deeply interested in the welfare and 
progress of the communitv in which he resides. 




DEXTER E. WADSWOKTH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'3' 



He is a stronj;- Republican in politics, support- 
ing the princijiles of that party by voice and 
vote. 




jIIARIJCS L. 1-ARNSWORTlI, a 
bread, cake, and pastry baker at Ev- 
erett Square, Hyde Park, is a self- 
made man in the highest sense im- 
plied by the term. He was born in Whiting- 
ham, Vt. , November 24, 1S40, son of Luke 
W. Farnsworth. His grandfather, Thomas 
Farnsvvorth, was born in the Green Mountain 
State, and there spent his threescore and ten 
years of life employed as a farmer and black- 
smith. Luke W. Farnsworth grew to man- 
hood on the parental farm, assisting in its 
management until of age. Going then to 
Cape Ann, Massachusetts, he worked for some 
ten years at quarrying, first as a common 
laborer and afterward as foreman of the quarry. 
Subsec[uently, returning to Vermont, he jiur- 
chased land in Whitingham ; and from that 
time until his demise, at the venerable age of 
eighty-two years, he was engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Harriet ]^righam, was born in Whiting- 
ham, daughter of John Brigham, a leading 
farmer of that town. Si.x children were born 
of their union, namely: Charles L., the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Sophia, the wife of Charles 
E. Chase; Ann F. , the wife of Trueworthy 
Hayward, of Boston; John A., of whom there 
is no special record ; Laura, who married 
Cyrus Boyd, and lives on the old homestead; 
and Ellen, the wife of Frederick Clifford, liv- 
ing in Maine. The mother passed away in 
'879, aged si.xty years. Both she and the 
father were regular attendants of the Univer- 
salist church. 

Charles L. Farnsworth remained beneath 
the parental roof until he attained man's 
estate, obtaining his education in the public 
schools, and acquiring a thorough knowledge 
of agriculture on the homestead. Coming 
then to Boston, he secured a situation as a 
driver of a baker's cart. In the ten years that 
he remained in that capacity, he became fa- 
miliar with the business, and in 1869 was able 
to start a bakery in Hyde Park, then a village 
Qf fi thousand inhabitants. Having begun in 



a modest, unassuming manner, limiting his 
venture to the capital he had to invest, he has 
since built up an e.xtensive and remunerative 
trade in breati, cake, and all kinds of pastry. 
Mr. Farnsworth has a large local jwtronage, 
besides a considerable share of that of the sur- 
rounding towns, including Uuincy, Neponsct, 
Dcdham, and Milton; and he employs si.x 
wagons and twenty hands. He is one of the 
oldest-established merchants in the place, and 
has taken an active ])art in developing the re- 
sources of the town, which has grown rapidlv 
in the past few years. 

Mr. Farnsvvorth was married in 1869 to 
Miss Nellie D. Clifford, who was born in 
Maine, being one of the live children of Cap- 
tain John Clifford. The children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Farnsworth are: Harry, lulith, Nellie, 
and Alice. Harry, who is an electrician, 
married Florence Page, and has one son, Au- 
gustus. A zealous advocate of the principles 
of the Republican party, Mr. P'arnsworth is 
fully alive to his duties as a true and faithful 
citizen. He has served as Selectman for two 
years, being chairman of the board for one 
year; as Overseer of the Poor and as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health ; and he for four 
years was connected with the fire department 
as city engineer. An esteemed member of the 
Masonic fraternity, he belongs to the Hyde 
Park Lodge, F. & A. M. ; to Norfolk Chap- 
ter, R. A. M., of which he has been High 
Priest; to the Hyde Park Council; and to 
Cyprus Commandery, in which he has served 
as Standard Bearer. He is also a member of 
Forrest Lodge and Monterey F'ncampment of 
the I. O. O. v., and a charter member of the 
Knights of Honor. He and his wife are active 
members of the Congregational church, which 
his children attend. Mr. F'arnsworth's 

bakery, which is one of the largest in the 
county, was erected under his personal super- 
vision. 



EXTER EMERSON WADS- 
WORTH, one of the foremost 
dry-goods merchants of the city of 
Ouincy, was born in the neighbor- 
ing town of Milton, March 7, 1866, a son of 
Edwin De.xter and Ellen M. (Elmerson) \\'ads. 



Ji 



132 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



worth. After completing the course of study 
in the public schools of Milton, young Wads- 
worth entered Bryant & Stratton's Business 
College, from which he was graduated in 1882. 
His health being quite poor at that time, he 
did not engage in any especial business for a 
year or two. In 1884 he went to work for the 
firm of iirown, Durrell & Co., of Boston, re- 
maining with them five years. Then he 
opened a small store in the Adams Building, 
Ouincy. This venture was .so successful that 
al the end of two and a half years, needing 
better facilities and accommodations to meet 
the demands of the business, he removed to 
his present quarters in the Greenleaf Hotel, 
which at that time had just been remodelled. 
He now has one of the largest dry-goods stores 
in Norfolk County, well stocked with as com- 
plete a line of goods, excepting fancy dress- 
goods, and as large an assortment of small- 
wares as can be found in the largest store in 
Boston. He keeps five young ladies busily 
employe'd throughout the year, and during the 
holidays employs si.xteen clerks. In 1894 he 
opened a branch store in Milton, where he has 
already built up a substantia] trade, notwith- 
standing the recent business depression. 

Prominent in Masonic circles, Mr. Wads- 
worth is a member of Macedonian Lodge of 
Milton, of which he is J. W., and belongs to 
St. Paul's Chapter, the Boston Commandery, 
and the Boston Council. He has also fellow- 
ship in Damon Lodge, No. 12, K. of P., of 
Boston; the Quincy Club and the Ouincy 
Yacht Club; and he is the vice-president of 
the Granite City Club. In politics he is an 
unswerving Republican, and he has been one 
of the Warrant Committee of the town of Mil- 
ton for two years. An energetic young man, 
Mr. Wadsworth has shown a remarkable apti- 
tude for business, and no doubt has a prosper- 
ous future before him. 




[APT. CHARLES W. HASTINGS, 

of South Weymouth, secretary of the 
Board of Commissioners of State 
.■\id, was horn in Schenectady, 
N.V., January 19, 1831, son of Elijah and 
Rebecca (.Smith) Hastings, who were both 
natives of the State of Massachusetts, On the 



paternal side he is directly descended from 
Thomas Hastings, of Ipswich, England, who 
came with his wife to America in 1834, set- 
tling in Watertown, Mass. His maternal 
grandfather was a minute-man in Revolu- 
tionary times, and was at Lexington and other 
battles. Of the Richards tribe, from whom 
his mother was descended, no less than eight 
members of one family were soldiers in the 
Revolution. 

Captain Hastings's father died rather early 
in life, leaving his widow with nine children. 
At five years of age Charles W. was taken into 
the family of his aunt, Mrs. Enoch Whiting, 
of -St. Albans, Vt. , where he remained until 
thirteen years of age. He then made his 
home with his cousin, Calvin Whiting, of the 
same place, an extensive tanner; but a short 
time afterward he became a member of the 
family of Benjamin F. Tuller, an agriculturist 
near St. Albans. At the age of seventeen he 
was thrown on his own resources; and begin- 
ning life for himself he first obtained employ- 
ment with the then well-known S. N. Dicken- 
son, a job printer of Boston. Mr. Dickenson 
also owned a type foundry; and, after serving 
as office boy, Mr. Hastings was employed in 
the stereotype department of the concern. 
He left this business to go into the freight 
department of the Western Railroad at Spring- 
field, but in 1852 became an employee in the 
shoe factory of Tirrell & Bates at South Wey- 
mouth, with whom he continued until 1 861. 
Elected in the fall of i860 Representative for 
the town of Weymouth to the lower house of 
the State legislature, he served during a por- 
tion of the session of 1S61, resigning in April 
to enter the army. 

He enlisted in what was afterward Company 
H, Twelfth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, 
known as the W'ebster Regiment, Colonel 
Fletcher W^ebster in command. He was 
elected First Lieutenant of the company at 
its organization, and August 10, 1862, was 
made Captain, so remaining until his dis- 
charge from the service in March, 1865. His 
company became a part of the Army of the 
Potomac under the immediate command of 
General Banks in Maryland. In 1862 he 
joined the General's expedition to the Shen- 
andoah Valley. He was in a skirmish at 




CHARLES W. HA.S'riN(;s. 



hio(;rai'II1(AL rkvikvv 



'35 



Thoroughfare Gap, and was afterward in the 
battle of second Bull Run, where Colonel 
Fletcher Webster fell. He fought in the 
battles of South Mountain, Antietani, P'reder- 
icksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and 
participated also in the Mine Run campaign, 
the battles of the Wilderness, and Spottsylva- 
nia. Having crossed the North Anna River, 
it was at this time that Captain Hastings was 
captured by the Confederates, and, being 
taken to Libby Prison, spent a week within 
the walls of that den of horrors. With other 
officers, he was then transferred to Macon, 
Ga., and imprisoned in a stockade. From 
there he was taken to Savannah, thence suc- 
cessively to Charleston jail yard, to Colum- 
bia, S. C. , and to Charlotteville, N.C. , where 
he was duly paroled and sent to Wilmington, 
N.C, to rejoin the Union forces. 

Honorably discharged March 12, 1865, he 
returned to South Weymouth, and has since 
remained in this town. He was employed in 
a shoe factory, until 1871, when he was ap- 
pointed clerk of the Board of Police Commis- 
sioners, then under the metropolitan system. 
In this capacity he served for about four years, 
and after that he again entered the shoe fac- 
tory. Receiving the appointment of docu- 
ment clerk in the ofifice of the Secretary of 
the Commonwealth in December, 1877, he 
discharged the duties of that position until 
May, 1879, when he received the appointment 
he now holds, of State Aid Commissioner, 
and was chosen clerk of the board, or, in 
other words, e.xecutive ofificer. 

He married first Rachel F. Rogers, daugh- 
ter of John G. Rogers, a former well-known 
citizen of Weymouth. By her he had two 
sons — Edward R. and Alfred W. He mar- 
ried second Marion E. Daggett, daughter of 
Isaac R. Daggett, late of Weymouth. 

The Captain is a charter member of Rey- 
nolds Post, G. A. R., No. 58, at East Wey- 
mouth, and has served sixteen years as Adju- 
tant of the post and two terms as its Com- 
mander. He attends the Universalist church 
at South Weymouth, and is a member of the 
Prudential Committee. A Republican in 
politics, he is a public-spirited citizen and one 
of the honored members of the community. 
He is a director in the South Weymouth Co- 



operative Bank, and is agent for the 15oard of 
Trustees of the Soldieis' Home in Massachu- 
setts, situated at Chelsea, his duties being to 
investigate cases of soldiers and sailors apply- 
ing for admission. 



-*-•••-♦— 




HARLES H. RILEY, the popular 
Postmaster of Dedham, was born in 
this town, January i, 1S52. The 
genial qualities which have made 
him a favorite with all who know him are, no 
doubt, inherited from his Irish parents. The 
father, Francis Riley, who after his marriage 
came to America, settling in Dedham and 
working as a gardener, died at the age of forty- 
four. Of his five children the only other sur- 
vivor is now one of the sweet-faced Sisters of 
Charity who care for orphaned children in St. 
Vincent's Orphan Asylum of Boston. The 
mother died at the age of fifty-si.x. 

Postmaster Riley lost his father when but a 
lad of twelve years. From that time his work- 
ing life began, as it was needful for him to 
earn his own living and to assist in the sup- 
port of his mother. For seven years he was 
a clerk in a grocery store in this town, and 
then for the next twelve years he was clerk in 
a hay and grain business. VVhile in this posi- 
tion, his native ability and fitness to hold and 
administer positions of trust and responsibility 
were recognized; and he made many friends 
who were ready to put him forward as the best 
man in the town for the Postmastership. In 
the contest of 1886 Mr. Cummings received 
the appointment to this important position; 
but upon his resignation, in 1888, Mr. Riley 
was appointed to the office by President Cleve- 
land. At the end of his term of four years 
he was reappointed by President Harrison, 
and upon the expiration of his second term he 
was again reappointed by President Cleveland 
for another term of four years. The fact of 
these reappointments is in itself sufficient 
proof of his having filled the position in a 
highly .satisfactory way. Beginning with one 
clerk, the business of the office has been so 
much increased, and its facilities so extended, 
that now three clerks are employed. The 
Dedham office is one of the best appointed and 
best managed of its class in the State. Mr. 



•36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Riley believes in suiting the public conven- 
ience as far as possible, the most satisfactory 
thing about the Dedham office. In addition 
to the despatch with which the mails are 
handled there, a most gratifying feature is the 
constant and never-failing courtesy with 
which every service is rendered. In 1892 and 
1893 Mr. Riley had charge of all the offices 
in Norfolk County, being appointed by Post- 
master-General VVanamaker. After sending 
his report of these offices to Washington, he 
received a letter from the department compli- 
menting him on his excellent manner of con- 
ducting the business. 

In 1884 Mr. Riley was united in marriage 
with Mary Foley, of Cambridge. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Riley are communicants of the 
Roman Catholic Church. Mr. Riley is a 
member of the Catholic Order of P'oresters. 
Beginning life as a poor boy and with small 
equipment of education, he has by his own 
efforts, by personal industry and thrift, gained 
a position of influence, and has won for him- 
self general esteem. 




|DMUND G. BATES, an enterprising 
dry-goods merchant of East Weymouth, 
was born in Weymouth, Mass., June 
26, 1833, son of Jacob and Nabby L. (Water- 
man) Bates. He is a representative of old and 
highly reputable families of Weymouth. The 
Bates family, which is of English origin, 
sprung from three brothers who emigrated in 
company, one settling on Cape Cod, another 
in New Hampshire, and the other, of whom 
the subject of this sketch is a direct descend- 
ant, in Weymouth, Mass. Jacob and Nabby 
L. Bates were both lifelong residents of this 
town. The former died at the age of sixty- 
nine years, and the latter when nearly eighty- 
five. 

Edmund G. Bates was reared and educated 
in Weymouth. At the age of thirteen he 
entered the employ of Henry Loud, general 
storekeeper and Postmaster, with whom he 
remained as clerk for twenty years. Subse- 
quently, after serving with Mr. Loud's suc- 
cessor, C. W. Soule, for a year, he in 1875 
established himself in the dry and fancy goods 
business on Broad Street, East Weymouth, 



where he has built up a flourishing trade. 
Having started in business with a limited 
capital saved from his earnings, his prosperity 
is the result of his business ability ; and he has 
good reason to be proud of his success. For a 
number of years he has been a trustee of the 
E^ast Weymouth Savings Bank. He is a mem- 
ber of the Investment Committee, and he 
served on the Town Committee for some time. 

Mr. Bates married Jane B. Bicknell, daugh 
ter of Ouincy L. and Deborah (Porter) Bick- 
nell, both of whom were natives of this town. 
A fuller account of Mrs. Bates's ancestry may 
be found in a sketch of Zachariah L. Bicknell, 
which appears elsewhere in the Review. 
Mrs. Bates has had two children — Arthur W. 
and Addie L., neither of whom is now living. 

Mr. Bates has always displayed an active 
interest in the welfare of the town, and may 
be depended upon at all times to favor any 
measure calculated to develoji its resources and 
improve its condition. He is connected with 
various social and fraternal organizations, 
being a member of Orphans' Hope Lodge, 
F. & A. M. ; has been treasurer of South Shore 
Commandery, Knights Templar, for the past 
twenty-two years; and a member of Crescent 
Lodge, I. O. O. ¥., for over thirty years. 
He and his wife are members of the United 
Order of the Golden Cross, and both are popu- 
lar in social circles. 



-iTi^ANDOLPH P. MOSELEY, the act- 
In^ '"S secretary of the Brainard Machine 
JJt'V Company and the superintendent of 
their foundry at Hyde Park, was 
born in Columbus, Ohio, June 22, 1842, son 
of Thomas William PI. and Mary A. (Beck- 
ner) Moseley. The grandfather, Perrow 
Moseley, who was a Virginian by birth and a 
civil engineer by profession, reared a number 
of children, spent the most of his life in Ken- 
tucky, and died there at the age of eighty 
years. The father was reared and educated at 
Mount Sterling, Ky. In early life he fol- 
lowed his father's profession, and later was 
connected with the Washington Iron Works in 
fronton, Ohio, where he remained for sev- 
eral years. From Ironton he went to New- 
port, Ky. , and in 1862 came to Boston. He 




JOHN F. MERRILL. 



iii()(;r,\i'iiic.\i. kkvii'.w 



'39 



was the inventor of the corrugated iron roofing, 
which he manufactured for some years. Then 
he organized the Moseley Iron IJridge and 
Roof Company, whose plant was located in 
Roxbury and Readville, Mass. He was also 
the projector and builder of a large rolling- 
mill in Readville, where he employed an aver- 
age of four hundred men, and carried on an ex- 
tensive business. His death occurred in 1879, 
at the age of sixty-four years. As an able and 
energetic business man he was an important 
factor in advancing the iron manufacturing in- 
terests of this locality, and his connection with 
the industries of Boston and its vicinity was 
exceedingly beneficial to the laboring classes. 
Originally a Whig in politics, he later be- 
came a Republican. His religious creed was 
the Presbyterian. He wedded Mary A. Beck- 
ner, of Carlisle, Ky. , who died at the age of 
sixty-six years. She was the mother of three 
children; namely, Anna M. L., Randolph P., 
and Samuel R. 

Randolph P. Moseley passed his earlier 
years in Newport, Ky. , and acquired his edu- 
cation in a private academy. At the age of 
eighteen he entered the employ of his father. 
In 1862 he enlisted in Company D, P'orty- 
second Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers. 
While serving in the Civil War, he was capt- 
ured and held a prisoner for some time. 
Upon his return from the army he resumed 
his apprenticeship; and, after learning thor- 
oughly every branch of the iron manufacturing 
industry, be took charge of the rolling-mill. 
He also acted as superintendent of the Bridge 
Company, and as such directed the adjustment 
of a number of iron bridges built by that con- 
cern. He was connected with his father's 
enterprises until 1869, when he was employed 
by George Southern & Co. in the steam shovel 
manufactory in South Boston, and remained 
with that concern four years. He next en- 
gaged in the hotel business as the proprietor of 
the Everett House in Hyde Park, which he ran 
for a year; and for the succeeding four years 
he was employed by the Boston Gas Light 
Company. He then became the secretary and 
general superintendent of the Nashua Lock 
Company in Nashua, N. H. During his eight 
years' connection with that concern he pre- 
pared a large catalogue, containing one thou- 



sand different designs of locks, knobs, and 
keys, which was issued to the trade at a cost 
of fifteen thousand dollars. Some ten years 
ago he purchaseil an interest in the Brainard 
Foundry in Hyde Park, which is now carried 
on under his personal supervision. This con- 
cern makes castings of all kinds, employing 
a large force of workmen ; and its ofifice is lo- 
cated at 156 Oliver Street, Boston. 

In 1868 Mr. Moseley was united in marriage 
with Eugenia Davis, daughter of Timothy 
Davis, of Boston. She died in January, 1876. 
For his second wife he married Josephine B. 
Brainard, daughter of Amos H. Brainard, 
Esq., the founder and official head of the com- 
pany which bears his name. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moseley have two children — Robert B. and 
Eldna E. Politically, Mr. Moseley is a Re- 
publican. He served as an Assessor in Hyde 
Park for twelve years, and was elected a mem- 
ber of the board of Selectmen in 1896 and 
1897, during the last term being chairman of 
the board. He is connected with the Masonic 
fraternity, and is Past Commander of Timothy 
Ingraham Post, No. 121, G. A. R. Mr. 
Mosele)- has had a very successful business 
career. He is especially familiar with the 
process attending the alloying of metals, and 
is frequently called into court as an expert. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moseley are Episcopalians. 



t^TON. JOHN FLINT MERRILL, 
L^J the proprietor of the Boston Branch 
_|_U I Grocery Store at Ouincy and one of 

— ' the leading merchants of the city, 
was b(irn January 16, 1849, in Brownfield, Ox- 
ford County, Me., son of Samuel Eastman 
Merrill. The family is, presumably, of 
Huguenot extraction, although the first ances- 
tor of whom there is anything definitely 
known was Nathaniel Merrill, who emigrated 
to this country from Hampshire, England, in 
1634, settling in Newbury, Mass. In relig- 
ious faith he was a Separatist, belonging to 
the sect known as the Orthodox Congrega- 
tional ; and his descendants to the present 
day, without a break, are alleged to have 
affiliated with the same denomination and to 
have ranked high as regards intelligence and 
morality, while, for the greater part, obtain- 



140 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ing their living by tilling the soil. One of 
his grandsons settled in Concord, N. H., at an 
early period, where John Merrill, a son of 
said grandson and the great-great-grandfather 
of John F. Merrill, was born and reared. 

Nathaniel Merrill, the great-grandfather of 
John F., also a native of Concord, was born in 
1738. Soon after his marriage with Martha 
Walker he removed to Fryeburg, Me., where 
he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for 
many years, and reared his family of thir- 
teen children. Subsequently he removed to 
Brownfield, where his death occurred at a 
ripe old age. The line of descent was contin- 
ued through his son Nathaniel, who was born 
and bred in Fryeburg, whence in early man- 
hood he went to Brownfield. Here he took up 
a large tract of wild land, which he converted 
into a good homestead. His wife, a native 
of Conway, N.H., whose maiden name was 
Phebe Merrill, came of the same ancestral 
stock though far removed. They became the 
parents of seven children, all of whom were 
born on the Brownfield homestead. They 
were: Phebe, Samuel Flastman, Mary, Otis, 
Clarinda, Phedora, and Horatio. 

Samuel Eastman Merrill was born F'ebruary 
22, 1802, in Brownfield, where he lived for 
nearly half a century, devoting his time and 
attention to farming. In 1852 he settled in 
Fayette, Kennebec County, Me. Two years 
later he removed to Norway, Me., where he 
spent his remaining years, dying there Decem- 
ber 19, 1878. With the exception of four 
years spent in manufacturing, he continued in 
the occupation to which he was reared, and 
was known as a practical and prosperous 
farmer. In the slavery days he was a Free 
Soiler. Later he became an earnest supporter 
of Neal Dow's prohibition principles. In 
June, 183 1, he married Clarissa Flint, of 
Norway, Me., a daughter of John Flint, who 
sprung from a pioneer family of Esse.x County, 
Massachusetts. Both he and his wife were 
very active members of the Congregational 
church, which he served many years as Dea- 
con. They had eight children, namely: 
Elizabeth F., born in 1S33, who died in 1837; 
Clara Phebe, born in 1835, now the widow of 
the late James B. Potter, of the firm of Moore, 
Smith & Co., of Boston; James Flint, born in 



1837, who married Harriet Brown, and lives 
in Quincy, Mass. ; Horatio Otis, born in 
1840, who died in 1846; Samuel Oscar, born 
in 1842, who married Fannie Green, of Bos- 
ton, and is now a resident of Nashville, 
Tenn. ; Elizabeth Flint, born in 1845, who 
resides in Ashmont, Mass. ; Jcjhn FTint, the 
subject of this sketch ; and F'rederick, born in 
1850, who died in 1854. 

A child when his parents removed to Nor- 
way, Me., John F'lint Merrill was there reared 
and educated, attending its public schools. 
On reaching man's estate he obtained the 
situation of clerk in a Boston grocery store, 
where he remained five years. Then, conver- 
sant with the business, he returned to his 
native State, opened a grocery in Lewiston, 
and subsequently carried it on for three years. 
In 1878 he came to Quincy and started his 
present store. Since then he has built up an 
extensive and remunerative trade in fancy 
and staple groceries, having the largest store 
of the kind in the city. In 1886 he and 
A. G. Durgin built the Durgin & Merrill 
Block, the first business block with modern 
improvements, and one of the largest erected 
in Quincy. Mr. Merrill has always taken an 
active interest in the welfare of the city. He 
was the leading spirit in forming the Quincy 
Street Railway Company, of which he was at 
first the treasurer, and thereafter the president 
until it went out of existence. In 1890 he 
became a director of the Quincy & Boston 
Street Railway Company. He is also the 
president of the Braintree Street Railway 
Company, the treasurer of the Randolph 
Street Railway Company, and a director of the 
Cottage City and I\Iartha's Vineyard Street 
Railway Companies. 

On October 4, 1894, Mr. Merrill was mar- 
ried to Miss Elizabeth Upton Waters, daugh- 
ter of George F. Waters, a dentist of Boston, 
and now has one child, Catherine. He and 
Mrs. Merrill attend the Congregational 
church. In politics he is a straight Republi- 
can, and for four years was president of the 
Republican City Committee. He represented 
the towns of Quincy and Weymouth in the 
legislatures of 1887 and 1888, serving in both 
on the Water Supply Committee. In 1892 he 
was elected to the Massachusetts Senate, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



141 



re-elected in 1893. During liis first year here 
he was on the Committee on Meicantile Affairs 
and the Library Committee; and he was chair- 
man of the Committee on Constitutional 
Amendments. In his second year he was 
chairman of the Mercantile Affairs Commit- 
tee and a member of that on towns and bills 
to third reading. He'likewise carried through 
the bill for undergrounding the electric wires 
in the city of Boston. Mr. Merrill is a mem- 
ber of Rural Lodge, F. & A. M., of Quincy; 
of St. Stephen's Chapter, R. A. M. ; of South 
Shore Commandery, K. T. ; of Mount Wollas- 
ton Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; and for a time was 
connected with the Improved Order of Red 
Men and the Royal Arcanum. 



/ STeORGE MILES, who has been a pros- 
\ '•) I perous grocer in Hyde Park for up- 
ward of a quarter of a centur)', was 
born April 7, 1S42, in Stow, Middlesex- 
County. A son of Lewis Miles, he belongs to 
the family that has produced Major-general 
Nelson A. Miles, the present head of the 
United States Army. His great-grandfather, 
who fought in the French and Indian War, 
after being captured by the Indians, made his 
escape but a few hours before the morning 
appointed to burn him at the stake. Ezra 
Miles, the grandfather, spent a large part of 
his life in the town of Stow, being engaged in 
the cabinet-maker's trade in that locality, 
living there until his demise, at the age of 
fourscore and four years. 

Lewis Miles grew to man's estate in Stow, 
his native town, there acquiring his education 
in the common schools. He spent some years 
in Ro.xbury, Mass., in his early manhood, 
working in the rope-walk. Afterward he 
returned to Stow, where he purchased a farm, 
and was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
the close of his life, when si.xty-four years of 
age. He was a very successful farmer and 
business man, honorable and upright in all his 
dealings, and was held in the highest regard 
by the community. He married Miss Hannah 
A. Dean, who was born in Cohasset, Mass., 
one of the seven children of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Dean. Eight children were born of this 
union, six of whom are living; namely, Mrs. 



Hannah M. Mead, Lewis H., George, Alonzo, 
Mr.s. Martha A. Potter, and Albert T. Three 
of these sons, Lewis, Alonzo, and George, and 
one son-in-law, Mr. Mead, were brave partici- 
pants in the late war. The mother, a bright 
and winsome woman of fourscore years, is a 
devoted member of the Methodist church. 

George Miles lived beneath the parental roof 
until nineteen years of age, when he offered his 
services to his country. He was assigned to 
the hospital corps of the Seventh Massachu.setts 
Volunteer Infantry, and two years later was 
transferred to the sutler's department, in 
which he served until the end of the war. 
He saw many of the important battles of the 
war, some twenty in all, and experienced the 
hardships and privations of army life. Subse- 
quently, for three years, he worked for the 
Weed Tile Manufacturing Company, and then 
spent a few seasons at the old homestead in 
Stow. After that, securing a situation in the 
Boylston Market in Boston, he remained there 
until 1870, when he came to Hyde Park, which 
he has since made his home. Here he started 
at once in the grocery business as senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Miles & Silsbury, continu- 
ing thus rive )'ears, when the partnership was 
dissolved. Mr. Miles then carried on the 
business alone until 1890, when he took in a 
partner, the firm name having since been 
Miles & Morrison. These gentlemen are car- 
rying on a very large and profitable business, 
having two stores, and keeping a force of eight 
clerks busily employed. 

Mr. Miles was married December 25, 1873, 
to Miss Rosa Belle Allen. Born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., a daughter of Orville Allen, 
and a sister of the wife of Thomas E. Faunce 
(of whom a biography is presented on another 
page), she died at the age of forty years. 
Subsequently, on September 6, 1890, JNIr. 
Miles married Miss Eva E. Shaw, a daughter 
of William Shaw, of Hyde Park. Of this 
union one child has been born, Georgia Allen. 
In politics Mr. Miles is a sound Republican, 
and for two years he has served his fellow- 
townsmen as Selectman. A leading Mason in 
Plyde Park and vicinity for some years, he has 
done much to advance the interests of the 
lodges with which he is connected. He is a 
member of Hyde Park Lodge, F. & A. M., of 



14^ 



BlOGRAl'HICAL REVIEW 



which he has been chaplain ior years; of Nor- 
folk Chapter, R. A. RI., of which he is also 
chaplain; of Hyde Park Council; of Cyprus 
Conimandery, of which he has been Com- 
mander for two years, besides having held 
other offices ; of the Boston I.afayette Lodge 
of Perfection ; of the Giles F. Yates Council 
of Princes of Jerusalem ; of the Massachusetts 
Consistory, in which he has taken the thirty- 
second degree ; of the Commanders' Union of 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island ; and of the 
Blue Hill Chapter of the Eastern Star. He 
also belongs to the Red Men, to the Knights 
of Honor, and to the Royal Arcanum. Mr. 
Miles has been a director of the Hyde Park 
Co-operative Bank since its organization, was 
its president for si.x years, and is now its vice- 
president. He is a member of the Hyde Park 
Historical Society, in which he takes a deep 
interest. Both Mr. and Mrs. Miles are active 
members of the Baptist church, and contrib- 
ute generously toward its support. 




ILLIAM B. HOLMES, a success- 
ful general farmer of Sharon, was 
born in North Easton, Mass., May 
8, 1847, son of Bradford and Harriet (Ale.xan- 
der) Holmes. The farm he now occupies was 
purchased by his grandfather, Nathan Holmes, 
a native of Stoughton, who cut thereon a con- 
siderable amount of ship timber, hoop poles, 
and wood. The grandfather, Nathan, married 
Zilj^ha Monk, of Stoughton, and their chil- 
dren were nine in number; namely, Nathan, 
Clements, Elijah, Bradford, William, Fisher, 
Wadsworth, Francis, and Zilpha. 

Bradford Holmes, father of William B. , was 
born in Stoughton, and accompanied his par- 
ents to .Sharon when quite young. While 
still a y(jung man he removed to North Easton, 
where he remained for over twenty years, dur- 
ing which time he was engaged in teaming. 
Subsequently, returning to Sharon, he re- 
sided here until his death, which occurred in 
1882. In politics he was a Republican, and 
he held at different times several town offices. 
He was a member of the Lliii versa! ist church. 
His wife, Harriet Alexander, who was a 
native of Chestervillc, Me., became the 
mother of five children, of whom two were 



twins. The twins are no longer living; and 
George has also passed away, dying at the age 
of twenty-one years. The survivors are: 
Mary, the first-born, who is now the widow of 
Jeremiah M. Leonard, late of Stoughton; and 
William B. , the subject of this sketch. The 
mother died in i8g6. 

William B. Holmes supplemented the edu- 
cation obtained in the common schools of 
Sharon by attendance at Stoughtonham Insti- 
tute, where he finished his school studies. 
Since reaching manhood he has tilled the soil 
of the homestead farm besides dealing largely 
in milk. He also does a good business in 
wood and hoops. In politics he supports the 
Republican party; and he has been called upon 
to seive in several of the town offices, in all 
of which he has acquitted himself with credit. 

On .September 23, 1896, Mr. Holmes was 
united in marriage with Caroline P. Bowden, 
daughter of Anthony W. and Hellen N. Bow- 
den, of Boston. He is a member of Lodge 
No. 72, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Grange No. 197, of Stoughton. He and 
his wife attend the L^niversalist church. 



B 



AVTD NEAL, who has been identi- 
fied with the mercantile interests of 
Norfolk County for more than a 
quarter of a century, is carrying on 
an extensive trade in groceries on Washington 
Street, Dedham, where he has a fine and well- 
equipped store. Son of Rufus Neal, he was 
born April 18, 1828, in Palermo, Waldo 
County, Me. 

Rufus Neal was born on a farm in North 
Berwick, Me., being one of a family of twelve 
children. He was reared to agricultural' pur- 
suits, which he followed throughout his long 
life of seventy-eight years, first in his native 
town and later in Palermo, where he settled 
soon after his marriage. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Sarah Buffum, was a daugh- 
ter of Jonathan Buffum, and one of a family of 
thirteen children. She also was born and 
reared on a North Berwick farm. She was 
the mother of five children, three of whom are 
still living; namely, Miss Harriet L. Neal, 
Mrs. Jane P. Shorey, and David, the special 
subject of this brief biographical sketch. The 




DAVID NEAL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•45 



motlier lived to the ripe old age of eighty 
years, and diu ing her entire life clung to the 
Quaker faith, in which she was reared, her 
husband being a devout and true Universal ist. 

David Neal spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth on the home farm, obtaining his 
education in the district schools. When nine- 
teen years old he left home and went to 
Orono, Me., about eight miles above liangor, 
where he worked in a lumber-mill two years. 
Going thence to South Yarmouth, Mass., he 
learned the trade of printing oil-cloth carpets, 
and worked at that business in different cities 
for sixteen years. After being employed 
as an operator in mills at Hallowell Cross- 
roads, now Manchester, Me., two years, 
at Fall River, Mass., two years, Winthrop, 
Me., one year, and at Cleveland, Ohio, two 
years, he spent a short time in his child- 
hood's home, and then worked in the South 
Dedham Mills until the winter of 1861, when 
he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
settling on the farm which he had previously 
purchased in Palermo, Me. Two years later 
he again went to Hallowell to work in the 
mills; but in a short time he gave up his posi- 
tion and opened a meat market in that town, 
remaining there five years. 

He was ne.xt located in Ashland, Mass., for 
two years, having charge of the meat market 
of H. W. Barrett. In 1871 Mr. Neal ac- 
cepted the position of clerk in his present 
store in Dedham, a position which he faith- 
fully filled seven years, in that time becoming 
fully acquainted with the details of the busi- 
ness. He then started as a grocer on his own 
account, opening a store a short distance away, 
and remained there prosperously engaged until 
1 89 1, when he removed to his present com- 
modious and well-arranged quarters. Mr. 
Neal is, with one exception, the oldest-estab- 
lished grocer in Dedham, and by his upright, 
honorable business methods has built up a 
large and lucrative trade, securing an extensive 
patronage among the best people of the town. 
He carries a full stock of staple and fancy 
groceries, besides having a large assortment of 
crockery and glassware, his highest endeavor 
being to meet the wants and please the tastes 
of his numerous customers. 

On March 7, i860, Mr. Neal married Miss 



Frances E. Griggs, who was born in Dedham, 
daughter of James Grigg.s, a cabinet-maker of 
this place. Mr. and Mrs. Neal have two chil- 
dren ^ — Carrie I^. and lulgar, who both live in 
Minneapolis. lulgar Neal is an electrician 
in that city; and his sister is the wife of 
Oliver T. Erickson, and has three children — 
Elsie, Irene, and Frances. 

Mr. Neal takes an active interest in all 
things pertaining to the welfare of his adopted 
town, and for four years, or since 1893, has 
been a member of the Board of Selectmen, at 
the election in iSg6 receiving the largest num- 
ber of votes cast for any one candidate for 
office. In politics he is a strict adherent of 
the Republican party. I"'-or over thirty years 
he has been connected with the Masonic 
order, having united with Kennebec Lodge in 
Hallowell, Me., and being now a member of 
Consolation Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Ded- 
ham. He is also a member of the Samuel 
Dexter Lodge, No. 232, I. O. O. F. Mr. 
Neal and his wife and daughter are connected 
with the L'nitarian church in Dedham. 



flMOTHY OWEN, a prosperous druggist 
of Canton, who was born in Hanover, 
N.H., March 28, 1847, is a son of 
Frederick L. and Rebecca B. (Chandler) 
Owen. His great-grandfather was an early 
settler of Hanover; and his grandfather, Tim- 
othy (first), was a resident of the same town. 
Frederick L. was fitted for college at Kimball 
Union Academy; and he would have taken a 
course at Dartmouth College, but. for the 
death of his father. He spent his life as a 
farmer, mostly in Hanover and Lebanon. 
His wife, Rebecca, had four children — Tim- 
othy, Millard F., Emily, and Frederick L., 
Jr. Millard died at the age of fifteen. The 
father, having survived the mother, contracted 
a second marriage with Emeline E. Ingalls, 
who had no children. He died in Lebanon at 
the age of sixty-seven years. 

After receiving his early education in the 
common schools and at Kimball Union Acad- 
emy, Timothy Owen attended Dartmouth Col- 
lege for two years, completing a course at the 
age of nineteen. Afterward he returned to 
Hanover, and studied pharmacy with Dr. 



■ 46 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Smith. He then took charge of the business, 
and for two years managed the store of George 
Kendrick at Lebanon. His next step was to 
go to Boston, where he entered the employ of 
Theodore Metcalf & Co,, remaining with them 
for about two years. Also for about the same 
length of time he was associated with his 
father-in-law in that city. In 1877 he came 
to Canton, and started for himself in the drug 
business, which he has since prosperously fol- 
lowed, carrying a full stock of drugs and med- 
icines. He is a member of the College of 
Pharmacy. 

Mr. Owen has been Ta.\ Collector for seven 
years, and on the Board of Registrars for two 
years. He is a member of Blue Hill Lodge 
of Masons; of Mount Zion Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons, of Stoughton; of Hyde Park 
Council; and of Cyprus Commandery, Knights 
Templars, of Hyde Park. He has taken the 
degrees in the Independent Order of Odd P^el- 
lovvs, and is now Past Grand therein. In the 
Blue Hill Lodge, A. F. & A. M., mentioned 
above, he has been the secretary for thirteen 
years. He was a member and an officer of the 
Golden Cross Commandery, the collector and 
the local secretary for the Bay State Benefi- 
ciary Association, and the secretary of the Odd 
Fellows and Masonic Accident Association. 
In politics he is a Republican; and his family 
attend the Universalist church, which he has 
served as collector for the past three years. 
He was married in 1871 to Nancy J., daughter 
of Silas D. Coburn, of Boston. They have 
six' children — Florence L., Alice M., Fred- 
erick L. , Daisy E., S. Coburn, and Mabel R. 




NDREW J. NORRIS, of Dedham, the 
agent of Parker's Boston Express, and 
for over fifty years a resident of this 
town, was born in Dorchester, 
X.H., P'ebruary 2, 1830, son of Zebulon and 
Martha (Everett) Norris. The grandfather, 
Nathaniel Norris, who was a native of Strat- 
ford, N.H., settled in Dorchester when a 
young man, and erected mills. He had car- 
ried on a large manufacturing business for 
many years, when he retired; and he died at 
the age of eighty years. He reared a family 
of ten children, of whom Zebulon was the eld- 



est. Some of his sons succeeded to their 
father's business, which was located in a part 
of Dorchester, N.H., known as Norris Mills: 
and two became Methodist ministers. 

Zebulon Norris, father of Andrew J., left 
home in 1833, and established a line of eight- 
horse teams between a point in Vermont and 
Boston. His teams made the round trip, 
three hundred and fifty miles, in twenty days, 
and transported large quantities of freight. 
Some years later he gave up the business; and, 
after following agricultural pursuits for a 
time, he came to Dedham, where he passed 
the rest of his life. He figured quite promi- 
nently in public affairs, serving as a Select- 
man, Assessor, and Overseer of the Poor in 
the town of Fairlee; Vt. , and he was for two 
years a Representative to the legislature. 
His wife was a native of Chesterfield, N.H., 
and a daughter of Nathaniel Everett, a pros- 
perous farmer. She reared three children, 
two of whom are living, namely: Andrew J., 
the subject of this sketch; and Samuel M. 
Zebulon Norris and his wife died at the age of 
sixty-nine years. They were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Andrew J. Norris was educated in the 
common schools, and resided at home until 
seventeen years old. Going then to Boston, 
he secured a position as clerk in a dry-goods 
store. A short time later he settled in Ded- 
ham, where he entered into partnership with 
Benjamin Boyden, and carried on business at 
East Dedham several years. In 1870 he en- 
gaged in the grocery business upon his own 
account in the central part of the town, and 
for twenty years conducted a thriving trade. 
He sold out in 1890, since which time he has 
been connected with Parker's Express, having 
charge of the business at this end of the line. 
Politically, Mr. Norris is a Republican. . For 
six years he served as a Selectman, some of 
the time acting as chairman, when the duties 
of assessing the town and overseeing the poor 
were in charge of the board. 

In 1849 Mr. Norris was joined in marriage 
with Harriet T. Boyden, daughter of Benjamin 
Boyden, his former business associate. Mrs. 
Norris has had seven children — Albert B., 
Clara, Edward E., Elizabeth E., Frank, 
Annie H., and Ferdinand F. Edward is now 




HENRY S. DRAPER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



149 



deceased; Albert B., who is in the dry-goods 
business in Boston, married Annie Ingails, 
and has three children — Albert !>'., Thomas 
M., and Martha; Elizabeth E. is the wife of 
O. H. Hammond, and has one daughter, Mai- 
jorie; Frank, who occupies a responsible po- 
sition with S. S. Pierce, Boston, married Ada 
Mosicr, and has one son, Ralph; Ferdinand 
is also in the employ of S. S. Pierce; Eliza- 
beth E. and Annie H. are copyists in the 
office of the Norfolk County Registry of 
Deeds. The children were all educated in 
the common and high schools of Dedham. 
They are all interested in music; and Frank is 
a well-known tenor singer, a member of a 
quartette and of the Apollo Club of Boston. 
Mr. Norris, Sr., is Past Master of Constel- 
lation Lodge, F. & A. M., and a charter 
member of the Knights of Honor. The fam- 
ily attend the Episcopal church. 



1p)TENRY SIDNEY DRAPER, of West 
L^-l Dedham, one of the most extensive 

_|_ls I dairy farmers in Norfolk County, 

— ' was born in the vicinity of his pres- 
ent home, July 18, 1827, son of Willard and 
Louisa (Smith) Draper. 

His paternal grandfather, whose name was 
Daniel, was the youngest son of Aaron 
Draper, who resided in Dover, Mass., and 
reared three sons and three daughters. Daniel 
Draper married Amy Deane. He was the first 
of the family to settle in West Dedham, where 
he followed the wheelwright's trade in connec- 
tion with farming. 

Willard Draper, son of Daniel and Amy 
(Deane) Draper, was by occupation a farmer. 
He married Louisa, daughter of Abijah Smith, 
and had a family of nine chiUlren, of whom 
Henry S., the subject of this sketch, is the 
eldest, and now the only one living. The 
others were: Frank, Louisa, Whiting .S., 
Mary, Dora, Hannah, Abijah, and Edward. 

Henry S. Draper resided at home until 
twenty years of age, and then engaged in 
farming upon his own account. He bought a 
small piece of land, upon which he began 
dairy farming on a limited scale, gradually in- 
creasing his acreage as his business advanced 
in pros]3erity, and his improvements kept pace 



with his progress. When circumstances re- 
quired the erection of large barns, he visited 
Maine, and purchased nine or ten carloads of 
lumber, thus securing well-selected building 
material at wholesale rates. He now owns 
five hundred acres of excellent tillage and 
pasture land, keeps one hundred and seventy- 
eight cows, and handles three hundred cans of 
milk and twenty gallons of cream per day. 
He has established and sold eight different 
milk routes in Boston, and at the present time 
is supplying a numerous patronage in the 
Back Bay district. He has recently built a 
hennery one hundred and twenty feet long, 
fourteen feet wide, and twelve feet high; and, 
keeping from seven hundred to eight hundred 
fowls, he realizes an average of thirty dozen 
eggs per day. 

Mr. Draper married for his first wife Cath- 
erine Arris, a native of Maine. She died at 
the age of thirty-two years, leaving three 
daughters — Edna, Lucy, and Martha. Edna 
is now the widow of James Armstrong, and 
the mother of si.x sons and three daughters. 
Lucy, who is the wife of George Williams, 
and lives in Gardiner, Me., has one son and 
two daughters. Martha, who is now Mrs. 
McElroy, of Boston, has three children. For 
his second wife Mr. Draper wedded Harriet 
Butler, a native of Dixfield, Me., daughter of 
Shepard Butler. By this union he has four 
children; nainely, Sidney Waldo, Florence, 
Willard, and George. Florence is now Mrs. 
Almon Daniels, of Boston. She has had two 
daughters, but has been bereft of one. Will- 
ard Draper is married, and has two children. 
George, the youngest son, is attending school. 
In politics Mr. Draper is a Republican. He 
and Mrs. Draper united with the Baptist 
church many years ago, and the children are 
all members. 



tOBERT L. FR 
facturer of mor 
Park, was bori 



FRAMPTON, a manu- 
5rocco leather at Hyde 
)rn October iS, 1847, 
in New Bedford, Mass., son of 
Robert L. Frampton. The family originated 
in England, whence the first representative in 
America came in old Colonial times, locating 
probably in the South. James V. I'rampton, 



i;o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the grandfather of Robert L., was born and 
reared in South Carolina. A very successful 
planter, he had a large property, which, how- 
ever, was swept away by the war of the Ke- 
bellion. 

The fatner lived in South Carolina until tlie 
breaking out of the Rebellion, when he joined 
the Union army, enlisting at Washington, 
D. C. He married Elizabeth Moultrie, who 
was born and bred in South Carolina. She 
was the great-grand-daughter of the heroic 
Colonel William Moultrie, whose ' gallant de- 
fence of Fort Sullivan, in 1776, caused that 
place to be afterward called Fort Moultrie. 
Of her four children, James A., Robert L., 
and Charlotte E. are living. Charlotte E. is 
the wife of William Peabody, of Jamaica 
Plain. The mother, now seventy-eight years 
of age, and residing at South Braintree, 
Mass., is a woman of fine character, and be- 
longs to the Episcopal church. 

Robert L. Frampton spent his early life in 
New Bedford, acquiring a practical education 
in the public schools of that city. During the 
Rebellion he enlisted in New Bedford to fill a 
quota from Milford, Mass., as a drummer boy 
in the Nineteenth (unattached) Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he served until 
the cessation of hostilities. After returning 
to New Bedford, he worked in a morocco fac- 
tory, learned the morocco dresser's trade, and 
subsequently became foreman of a shop in 
Roxbury. A short time afterward he em- 
barked in business for himself at Boylston 
Station, remaining there six years. Then he 
transferred his operations to a large factory he 
had erected at Mount Hope, and where he car- 
ried on an extensive business for ten years, 
employing as many as one hundred hands, it 
being the largest and one of the oldest estab- 
lishments of the kind in New England. In 
1885 the Mount Hope factory was burned, and 
Mr. Frampton at once removed to Hyde Park, 
taking possession of the factory which he had 
previously built. He has since met with 
great and, seemingly, abiding prosperity. 

Mr. Frampton has been twice married. The 
first occasion was in 1871, when he was united 
to y\delaide Rogers, who was born in Rox- 
bury, Mass., a daughter of Joseph Rogers. 
She died in 1S75, leaving two daughters, both 



f)f whom are now deceased. His second mar- 
riage was made with Miss Amelia E. Russell, 
who was born and bred in Boston. .She has 
become the mother of one child, Robert L. 
Frampton, Jr., who is engaged in business 
with his father. The son, as well as the 
daughter, Adelaide R., was educated in the 
Berkeley School. Adelaide afterward took a 
course of study in the Boston Conservatory of 
Music. Mr. Frampton is a stanch Republi- 
can in politics. He belongs to the Boston 
Lodge of Elks, in which he has held office; is 
a charter member of Stony Brook Lodge, 
Knights of Honor, of which he has been finan- 
cial reporter for several years; and he is also 
a comrade of the Timothy Ingraham Post, No. 
121, G. A. R., of Hyde Park. In religious 
belief he is an Episcopalian, and with his 
family attends the Episcopal church. 



61 HOI 



HOMAS DUNBAR, a retired business 
' I man of Canton, Mass., was born here, 
August 19, 1 8 14, son of Thomas and 
Cloa (Bent) Dunbar. His great-grandfather 
was Samuel Dunbar, who settled in Canton in 
1727, and was a minister in the place for fifty- 
six years. Samuel's son, Elijah, was famous 
in the musical line, and was the first man in 
the State who sang by note. Elijah's son, 
Thomas (first), who was a farmer, in 1804 pur- 
chased the place where his son now lives, and 
where he spent the greater part of his life. 
The wife of this Thomas was a daughter of 
Captain William Bent, who was a soldier in 
the Revolution. Of their twelve children 
Thomas and Elijah are living. Elijah now 
resides in Grand Haven, Mich. The father 
died in 1854, at the age of eighty years. He 
was a stanch Whig in politics. 

Thomas Dunbar, the subject of this sketch, 
was educated in the common schools of his 
native place. At the age of sixteen he went 
to Dedham, Mass., and served five years as 
a millwright and machinist. After finish- 
ing his apprenticeship, he followed the same 
occupation for a year, and subsequently 
took charge of the Revere Copper Company 
works; and he remained in the business 
for six years. He then resigned, and went 
back to Dedham, where he formed a partner- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•S' 



ship with the man to whom he had been ap- 
prenticed. The partnership had lasted five 
years, when, in 1851, he went to Canada, and 
engaged in the contracting business. This 
turned out to be a permanent and lucrative 
undertaking, and occupied his time and atten- 
tion for twenty-seven years. The work was 
mainly dredging the harbors of Lake Erie. hi 
1877 he came back to Canton, and has re- 
mained there ever since, having retired from 
active business. 

Mr. Dunbar was married December 27, 
1837, to Hannah French. They have had six 
children, of whom the only survivor is Charles 
F., now a contractor in Buffalo, N.Y. Fred- 
erick, another son, who was a clerk for a man- 
ufacturing company in Stoughton, Mass., died 
at the age of forty-two. Elwin became a phy- 
sician, and died at the age of twenty-three. 
Willie T. died when he was twenty-nine years 
old. Mr. Dunbar is a member of the Unita- 
rian church, to whose support he is a liberal 
contributor. He has served as Deacon in the 
same for some time, and owns the same pew 
that his father did before him. In politics he 
is a Rei)ublican. He has been the superin- 
tendent of the cemetery for fourteen years. 



T^APTAIN ALPHEUS P. BOYD, an 
I \y esteemed resident of Needham, was 

\%^^ formerly a sea captain, engaged in 
the merchant service. Born in 
Wiscasset, Me., in 1826, he is a son of 
Thomas Boyd. The father, also a native of 
Wiscasset, born in 1780, who followed the 
same calling, died in 1835, in a small house 
on School Street, Boston, where the Parker 
House now stands. His death resulted from 
yellow fever, which lie had contracted in a 
Southern port. 

Alpheus P. Boyd attended the common 
schools of his native town for the customary 
period. Subsequently he took a course in the 
School of Navigation in New York City. Pre- 
vious to this he had spent five years at sea, 
sailing first as a cabin boy in the ship "Massa- 
chusetts," Captain Sampson, engaged in the 
carrying trade. He left the "Massachusetts" 
at San Francisco in 1850, and for the succeed- 
ing two years was engaged in freighting goods 



from vessels to the shore. Then he bought 
the schooner " Outolian," and sailed her for 
three years, running between the Sanrlwich 
Islands and San P'rancisco. After this he re- 
turned to Maine, and bought a half-interest in 
the "Highland Light" of Damariscotta, the 
other half being owned by Humphrey & Baker. 
He was three years in this ship, making 
voyages between New Orleans and Liver- 
pool, England. At the end of that time he 
sold half of his interest in her, took command 
of the "National" of Bath, Me., and engaged 
in the freight business between New Orleans 
and Havre, France. On the 26th of Novem- 
ber, 1858, the "National," which drew fifteen 
feet of water, was driven liy a heavy gale on 
the rocks off Colorado Reefs, near Cape An- 
tonio, Cuba, when the water was only seven 
feet deep. The ship and cargo were a total 
loss, but the passengers were taken off by a 
Spanish man-of-war, and landed at Havana. 
Captain Boyd then returned to Bath, and took 
command of the ship "Mazeppa," running her 
between New Orleans and Liverpool, with 
freights of cotton. He was in her a year and 
a half when a new ship, the "National," was 
placed under his command. This he sailed 
for two years and a half, between the same 
ports as when in the old "National." He 
then took charge of another new ship, the 
"Nyphon," also built in Bath, sailed her for 
three years, and then became master of the 
"Rangoon," built in Newburyport, Mass. He 
sailed the "Rangoon" from New York to 
San Francisco, and from Callao to Hamburg, 
Germany, carrying a cargo of general mer- 
chandise. He then went to San Francisco 
and Europe in the "Sapphire" of Newbury- 
port. He had been in charge of this ship two 
and one-half years, when she collided with a 
French man-of-war off the coast of California, 
and both vessels were disabled and obliged to 
put into San F'rancisco for repairs. A law- 
suit resulted, and was tried twice in the 
Lhiited Stares district courts of California. 
In both these trials the "Sapphire's" owners 
were beaten; but an appeal to the Supreme 
Court of the United States resulted in the 
final decision that each ship should pay her 
own e.\]Denses and costs, and should stand 
her own damages. The underwriters paid all 



I.;2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



damages to the "Sapphire," and presented her 
captain with a fine chronometer. Captain 
Boyd then took a new ship, the "Storm 
King," built at Richmond, Me., and sailed 
her in the East Indian trade for four years. 
His next command was the "Willie Rosen- 
felt," which after a short time he left for that 
of the "Solitaire" of Cardiff, England, and 
sailed to ports on the Pacific. In 1890, while 
on the last-named vessel, Captain Boyd was 
taken ill with yellow fever, contracted on the 
coast of Panama. He went to San Francisco, 
whence he came East overland, and then re- 
tired from active occupation. Since he came 
to Needham, in 1884, he has acquired shares 
in several sailing-vessels, and has interests 
with the Sewalls, the noted ship-builders of 
Bath, Me., for whom he formerly sailed in a 
number of vessels. 

In September, 1858, Captain Boyd was 
united in marriage with Susan T., daughter of 
Gilbert Trufant, of Bath, Me. Their chil- 
dren are: Helen, Gilbert T. , Thomas, James, 
Samuel, Susan, and Belle. Helen, born in 
i860, was educated in the schools of Bath and 
in the Gillman Young Ladies' School of Bos- 
ton. She married Robert E. Danfreld, a 
teacher in the Needham High School, and 
now located at Duluth, Minn. Gilbert T., 
born in 1S62, is now in Duluth, Minn., and 
holds a responsible position under the city 
government. He is unmarried. Thomas, 
born in 1863, is now chief mate of the steamer 
"Colon," in the Pacific mail service between 
Panama and San Francisco. He married in 
Costa Rica a Spanish lady of South American 
birth. James, born in 1866, graduated from 
Chauncy Hall School in Boston, and, after 
passing the entrance examinations for Harvard 
College, went West to Minnesota, where he 
engaged in the business of a plumber. Sam- 
uel, born in 1872, was educated in the public 
schools and in Comer's Commercial College, 
and is now in the lumber business in Duluth, 
Minn. Susan, born in 1877, is book-keeper 
for Mr. Isaac Rich, the well-known theatre 
man of Boston. Belle Boyd, born in 1881, is 
now a pujjil in the Needham High School. 
Captain Hoyd took his family with him on 
many voyages to the Mediterranean and to 
California. lie was made a Mason of Lincoln 



Lodge, No. 3, at Wiscasset, in 1857. He is 
also a member of the Boston Marine Society, 
which was incorporated in 1742, and consists 
of ship-owriers and captains. In politics the 
Captain is a Democrat. 



'CrJ)/' A. DRAKE, M.D., a prominent 
YfeV/ practitioner of Weymouth, with an 
•^ "^ ■ office at North Weymouth, was 
born October 22, 1849, in Concord, N.H., son 
of Simeon and Martha K. (Durgin) Drake. 
The first of the family in America was Robert 
Drake, who came from England in 1642, and 
settled at Hampton, N.H. The Doctor's 
boyhood was spent in Bath, Me., to which 
place his parents removed when he was about 
five years old. He attended the public 
schools of Bath and of Augusta, and received 
considerable instruction under private tutor- 
ship. When fifteen years of age he enlisted 
as a private in Company B of the First 
Battalion of Maine Sharpshooters, and after- 
ward served in Virginia, and was in the bri- 
gade which received the formal surrender of 
General Lee's army. After Dr. Drake's re- 
turn from the war he completed his educa- 
tion. Beginning the study of medicine after 
passing his majority, he graduated from the 
medical department of Bowdoin College in 
1879, and was selected for appointment in the 
Marine Hospital service. He was in this ser- 
vice for four years in all, and was located at 
Portland, Me., and at St. Louis. He re- 
signed his position at St. Louis on November 
I, 1879, ^n<^ in ^^^ following March came to 
North Weymouth, where he has since been en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession. For 
some thirteen years he has been a member of 
the School Board, and much of the efficiency 
of the public schools of the town is due in 
large measure to his wise and timely sugges- 
tions for improvement in various directions. 
For nine years he was the chairman of the 
board. He is a member of the Massachusetts 
Medical Association, and takes a lively inter- 
est in its proceedings. At present he is sur- 
geon of Reynolds Post. No. 58, G. A. R., at 
East Weymouth. He is also connected with 
the Masonic fraternity; and he attends the 
Congregational church at North Weymouth, 





JOSEPH M. GLOVER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEVV 



'55 



and liberally contributes to the siqiport of its 
various activities. 

Dr. Drake married Rosalie M. Horn, of 
Norway, I\1e., who is now the mother of one 
son, VVallace H. In politics the Doctor is a 
Republican, and he takes a strong interest in 
the affairs, of the town and State. He is a 
member of the Republican Town Committee, 
and is always ready to expend time and effort 
in behalf of his political pi'inciples. He is a 
director and stockholder in the Ouincy & 
Boston Electric Railroad Company. 



(JOSEPH M. GLOVER, a former resi- 
dent and a native of Ouincy, was born 
April II, 1S34. A son of John 
Glover, Jr., he was a descendant of one 
John Glover, who came from England to Mas- 
sachusetts on the ship "John and Mary," in 
1630, landing at Hull. His great-grand- 
father, Nathaniel Glover, was born in Dor- 
chester, Mass. The grandfather, John Glover, 
Sr., born August 13, 1769, on territory now 
included in Ouincy, died here in 1855. He 
learned the trade of a shoemaker when young, 
but never followed it, preferring farming, an 
occupation in which he was engaged through- 
out his active days. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Phoebe Curtis, born in Braintree, 
this county, September 23, 1778, was a daugh- 
ter of Samuel Curtis. They reared a family 
of ten children, of whom John, the first son 
and second child, was the father of Joseph M. 
John Glover, Jr., was born in Ouincy, 
Mass., November 21, 1803, and died January 
24, 1S89, having spent his long and busy life 
in this place. He was a bootmaker by trade, 
following that particular branch of it known as 
bottoming boots, and was a skilful and quick 
workman. A patriotic citizen, though not in 
actual service during the Rebellion, he was 
very active in raising soldiers for the army, 
and contributed funds for necessary expenses. 
He married Margaret Adams Field, a daugh- 
ter of William Field, and became the father 
of three children — William H., John, and Jo- 
seph M. 

Joseph M. Glover received a good education 
in the Quincy common schools. Afterward 
he learned the trade of a bootmaker, and 



worked at it until after the Ijreaking out of 
the Civil War. Then he enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the Sixtieth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry, and, going with his com- 
rades to the scene of conflict, served until the 
regiment was mustered out. Soon after his 
return to Ouincy he commenced book-keeping, 
which he afterward made his permanent occu- 
pation, being thus employed until his demise. 
On January 3, 1861, Mr. Glover married 
Frances A. Dodge, a daughter of Benjamin 
Dodge, of Ouincy. Benjamin Dodge, who 
was born in Beverly, Mass., brought up on the 
coast, imbibed a love for the sea, which he 
followed as a lad, shipping before the mast. 
One or two rough voyages proved enough for 
him, however; and he made up his mind to be 
content with land pursuits. Coming to 
Ouincy in early manhood, he began working 
in the quarries, and was afterward engaged in 
the granite business as long as he lived. His 
first wife died at an early age, leaving one 
child, Adeline, now the wife of Josiah Mun- 
roe, of Roxbury, Mass. He subsequently 
married Sarah Ann, daughter of Jacob Fowles, 
of Boston, who bore him four daughters. 
These were: Sarah Jane, who successively 
married Seth Pratt, of Weymouth, and Solo- 
mon Lovell, and died March 19, 1896; Eliza- 
beth F., now the wife of Napoleon B. Fur- 
nald, of this city; Mary A., who married 
David J. Pratt, of Weymouth; and Frances 
A., now Mrs. Glover. Mrs. Dodge passed 
away February 15, 1897, aged ninety years, 
eleven months, and twenty-three days. She 
was a strong Universalist in religious belief, 
and with her husband attended the church of 
that denomination. Addie Munroe Glover, 
the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Glover, is now 
the wife of Charles H. Burgess, of Ouincy. 
Mr. Glover, while holding liberal opinions on 
questions of religion, attended and generously 
su]3ported the Unitarian church. He died 
October 12, 1893, regretted as one of the 
most respected citizens of Ouincy. 



jTiMERY CLINTON BRITTON, a stable- 

F^ keeper of Canton, Mass., was born in 

^^^* ■ ^ Stoughton, Mass., November 14, 

185S, son of Joshua and Olive F. (White) 



IS6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Britton. His grandfather, Joshua Britton, 
was the first one of the family to settle in 
Easton, Mass. The Brittons trace their origin 
to three brothers who came from England at 
an early period. 

The father of Emery Clinton Britton was 
born December 27, 1S19, in Stoughton, where 
he still lives. He was a manufacturer of shoe 
machinery for the shoe trade, and still does 
some business in this line. In politics he is 
a Republican, but he has never held public 
office. He married Olive F. White, of Eas- 
ton, of whose twelve children by him six are 
living. These are: Leander G. , Melissa, 
Henry W., Horace E., Ellis P., and Emery 
C. Leander and Henry reside at Stoughton; 
Melissa is the wife of W. T. Morse, of West 
Medford, Mass; Horace E. now carries on his 
father's business; and Ellis F". is interested in 
mining at Cripple Creek, Col, 

Emery Clinton Britton obtained his general 
education in the public schools of his native 
town. Later he attended the Bryant & Strat- 
ton Commercial College at Boston, where he 
completed a course of study at the age of nine- 
teen. After this he was employed by his 
father for two years; and in 1883, June 15, he 
came to Canton. He started here in the 
livery and sale stable business. In 1889 he 
purchased the carriage repair shop of John 
Hall, and has now added that branch to his 
business. In his politics he is a Republican. 
He is a member of the Blue Hill Lodge of 
Masons and of Royal Arch Chapter of Stough- 
ton, in both of which he has held offices.- He 
is also connected with the Odd Fellows 
Lodge, No. 72, in which he has held office. 
He married Lizzie M. Cobb, of Sharon, 
daughter of Warren Cobb. They have one 
child, a daughter, Marjorie. The family at- 
tend the Universalist church. 




iHARLES H. ELLIS, the Postmaster 
of West Dedham, and one of the Se- 
lectmen of the town, was born here, 
December 14, 1852, son of Merrill 
D. Ellis. He is descended from Richard 
h'.llis, who located here in 1632. The next in 
line of descent was Joseph, born in 1666. 
After him came Deacon Joseph, born in 1696, 



who died in 1783, and then Abner, Sr., born 
in 1732, who died in 1781. Abner Ellis, 
.Sr., was one of the most prominent men of 
his generation, serving not only in town 
offices, but as a Representative to the General 
Court. Colonel Abner Ellis, born in 1777, 
the grandfather of Charles H., was brought 
up on a farm in West Dedham. For many 
years of his life he was engaged in general 
merchandise, his store standing on the site of 
the present establishment of his grandson, 
Charles II. Ellis. He was quite influential 
in local affairs. For a time he represented 
his town in the State legislature, and he was 
a Colonel in the State militia. In 1824 he 
was appointed Postmaster, a position which 
he afterward held until his death, in 1844. 
The first of his two marriages was contracted 
with Polly Gay, who had two daughters by 
him. His second marriage was made with 
Polly Newell, who bore him five sons. Theo- 
dore Gay, his assistant in the post-office, mar- 
ried a daughter of his, and in 1845 became 
Postmaster, holding the position till 1880. 

Merrill D. Ellis was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Dedham, remaining with his 
parents until reaching man's estate. He sub- 
sequently worked at various occupations in 
this vicinity, finding nothing congenial to his 
tastes until he embarked in the grocery busi- 
ness in Dedham, where he continued fifteen 
years. He eventually returned to West Ded- 
ham, assuming the management of his father's 
old store. He was a man of strong personal- 
ity, universally respected for his honesty. 
He took a leading part in town matters, serv- 
ing as Selectman and as district School Com- 
mittee for several years. He was also a Rep- 
resentative to the State legislature for three 
terms. He was a natural musician, being a 
fine violinist, and for many years led the choir 
of the Unitarian church. He was also one of 
the Parish Committee, and the parish clerk for 
a long time. He passed away at the age of 
sixty-nine years, his death being deeply de- 
plored by the community. He married Re- 
becca Ellis, who was born and bred in Ded- 
ham, being one of the three children of Jason 
Ellis, a well-known agriculturist. She died 
at the age of seventy-eight years, leaving 
three children; namely, Frederick, Susan, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'57 



and Charles M. An esteemed member of the 
Unitarian church, she did much toward its ad- 
vancement. 

Charles H. Ellis was educated in the public 
schools. As soon as he was old enough to be 
of assistance, he began working in his father's 
store. In 1869 he became one of the regular 
clerks, and in 1880 he succeeded to its owner- 
ship. At the same time he was appointed 
Postmaster, an office which he has since held, 
and which has been in his family for more 
than seventy years. In 1887, April 18, the 
store was burned to the ground ; but Mr. 
Ellis, with characteristic enterprise, immedi- 
ately rebuilt it, and has since carried on a 
more e.xtensive and prosperous business than 
before. He keeps in stock a full line of dry 
goods, boots and shoes, groceries, etc. His 
trade is large; and his store is one of the 
oldest in this locality, and well known for the 
standard quality of its goods. 

Mr. Ellis was married February 23, 1890, 
to Miss Emma Towne, who was born in Ver- 
mont, where her father, Hosea Towne, was en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. Three chil- 
dren have been born of this union; namely: 
Charles Newell, George Merrill, and Warren 
Hosea. Mr. Ellis was elected Selectman in 
189s, and re-elected to the same office in 
1896. Fraternally, he is a member of the 
A. O. U. W. 




IITJAM W. SCOTT, the manager 
of the Wilton Wool Scouring Mill 
at Hyde Park, was born in Hawick, 
Scotland, March 7, 1865, son of John and 
Jane (Wilson) Scott. His grandfather, 
Michael Scott, was a farmer, who resided in 
Scotland all of his life, and died at an ad- 
vanced age. 

John Scott, who left home when he was 
eight years old, worked on a farm until he was 
twenty. Then he engaged in the business of 
a wool -sorter or warehouse man. In 1869 he 
emigrated to the United States. Here he was 
employed as a wool-puller in various places 
until 1S72, at which time, his family having 
followed him to America, he settled in Hyde 
Park. He was in charge of the pickers for the 
Hyde Park Woollen Company until their mills 



were burned, and then started in the wool- 
scouring business for himself at Milton 
Lower Mills. In 1881 he erected the present 
mill in Hyde Park, where he established a 
business which has grown into an iniportant 
industry; and he continued at its head until 
his death, which occurred in March, 1893, 
when he was si.xty years old. He was a self- 
made man; and, aside from his natural capac- 
ity for labor, he displayed excellent business 
ability and strict integrity. He married Jane 
Wilson, daughter of William and Jeanette 
(Hunter) Wilson. Her father was a wool- 
sorter, and a native of the same locality in 
Scotland in which the Scotts resided. She 
became the mother of ten children, of whom 
five are living, namely: Walter, the superin- 
tendent of the Wilton Wool Scouring .Mill; 
William W., the subject of this sketch; Mary, 
the wife of Robert E. Grant; John P.; and 
Annie J. Mrs. John Scott is still living. 
She is a member of the Congregational 
church, as was her husband. 

William W. Scott was about eight years old 
when his parents emigrated to the United 
States, and he has resided in Hyde Park 
since he was sixteen years old. About 
the same time, after graduating from the 
Stoughton Grammar School in Boston, he 
began to learn the wool-scouring business with 
his father. Becoming thoroughly acquainted 
with the work, he ably assisted in carrying it 
on under his father's direction; and since the 
death of the elder Scott he has managed the 
enterprise as his mother's representative. 
The mill, which is equipped with modern ma- 
chinery, employs about twenty-five men, and, 
being the oldest of its kind in this locality, is 
favorably known to the trade. 

In 1893 Mr. Scott was joined in marriage 
with Minnie Monroe, daughter of Joseph B. 
Monroe, a native of Hyde Park, and a carpen- 
ter by trade. Her parents, who are still liv- 
ing, have reared five children. Mrs. Scott is 
the mother of three children; namely, Inez, 
Isabel, and Minnie. Mr. Scott has served as 
Constable for some years, is a member of the 
Board of Flealth, and in politics he is a Re- 
publican. He is one of the most popular 
yoimg men in Hyde Park, having a wide circle 
of friends and acquaintances, and occupies a 



'58 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



prominent social position. He is a Past 
Grand of Forest Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; Past 
Sachem of Neponset Tribe, Improved Order of 
Red Men; and he was formerly a member of 
the VVaverly Club. He was one of the first to 
ride a high-wheel bicycle after their introduc- 
tion, was captain of the old Hyde Park 
Bicycle Club, a member of the League of 
American Wheelmen, and he represented 
Massachusetts in the national meeting of that 
organization. Mrs. Scott is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 




'rank C. PACKARD, an enterprising 
business man of Ouincy, Mass., has 
been identified with its manufacturing 
interests for the past twenty years. He was 
born in this town, June 6, 1852, a son of Colo- 
nel Abner B. and Elizabeth (Newcomb) Pack- 
ard, of whom further mention may be found 
on another page of this volume. The subject 
of this sketch received his elementary educa- 
tion in the public schools of Ouincy, and sub- 
sequently followed a course of study at a pri- 
vate school. When seventeen years old he 
entered the employ of E. Packard & Co., man- 
ufacturers of boot and shoe makers' ink, as an 
assistant, continuing with them in that capac- 
ity until 1876, when he was admitted to the 
firm. In 1878 he began the manufacture of 
flavoring extracts, which he sold on the road, 
driving east to Cape Cod, and as far south as 
Providence, R.I., and going west to the New 
York State line — in fact, taking in nearly all 
the towns in the State on his regular routes. 
He was thus engaged until 1890, and, besidesi, 
made all the blacking sold by the firm, carry- 
ing on a very large business. Since 1883 he 
has been occupied with inside work almost ex- 
clusively. The firm has been exceedingly 
prosperous as regards its sale of both ink and 
extracts, and has also built up a fine jobbing 
trade in drugs and medicines. .Since 1872 
Mr. Packard has been a regular member of 
the fire department, having in that year joined 
the Washington M. French Hose Company. 
When that disbanded, he was sent to the Vult- 
ure engine of Ouincy Point, with which he 
remained six months. He was then made a 
"fine member" of the steamer company, of 



which he was afterward elected hoseman and 
the treasurer. For nearly ten years he has been 
assistant engineer of the fire department of 
Ward One. During one winter he made some 
money by hiring a skating rink, in which he 
entertained private parties twice each week 
throughout the season. In politics he affili- 
ates with the Republican party, but in local 
elections votes independently, and solely with 
a view to furthering the best interests of the 
city. 

He is a member of Mount VVollaston Lodge, 
No. 1,1. O. O. F. , and belongs also to the 
Knights of Honor, the New England Order of 
Protection, the O. U. A. M., and to the 
Knights of the Ancient .^scenic Order. He 
is likewise a member of the Granite City Club 
and of the Ramblers' Club. 

March 31, 1875, Mr. Packard married Miss 
Lucy C. Newcombe, daughter of Ira New- 
combe, of Ouincy. They have had six chil- 
dren, of whom but two are now living; 
namely, Alice Gertrude and Bertha Haskell. 
Mrs. Packard attends the Unitarian church. 



/^HARLES F. KNOWLTON, Com- 
I St-^ missioner of Public Works at Ouincy, 
\U was born in Swainpscott, Mass., 

January 31, 1865, a son of James 
Austin Knowlton. His great-grandfather, 
Edmund Knowlton, fought in the battle of 
Bunker Hill, also at Saratoga, where he capt- 
ured a British musket, proudly cherished by 
Mr. Knowlton. Edmund was a kinsman of 
Colonel Thomas Knowlton, of Hartford, Conn. 

James Knowlton, the grandfather of Charles 
F., was a native of Hamilton, Mass., where he 
spent his early years. Later he resided in 
the neighboring town of Magnolia. He was a 
farmer, carpenter, and boat-builder, and a 
good worker at all. 

James Austin Knowlton was born in Mag- 
nolia, Essex County, February 19, 1821. 
Under the instruction of his father he learned 
the trades of a ship-builder and house carpen- 
ter, which he followed winters until 1876. 
In the summer seasons he kept a hotel for the 
reception of guests from the city, having 
charge at different seasons of the Gloucester 
Hotel, the Pavilion, at both Gloucester and 



\ 



.'^tSSv 



,'/ 





FRANK C. rACKAKL). 



bi()(;k.\1'1iical RKviiav 



16, 



Crescent Keach, and the Hesperus at Mag- 
nolia. Each house was made very attractive 
to boarders, and had a substantial summer 
business. For several- years he let (or rent a 
hotel that he owned in Swampscott ; but in 
1882, having retired from his trades, he as- 
sumed the management of the house himself, 
and has since conducted it. A strict Republi- 
can, he has been quite active in local affairs, 
and served as an Overseer of the Poor, Asses- 
sor, and Selectman in Swampscott for a num- 
ber of years. He married Clara M., daughter 
of William F"uller, of Lynn, Mass. They have 
had eleven children, six of whom are living, 
namely: James B., of Ludlow, Mass.; Ed- 
mund P., of Swampscott; Daniel P., of 
Somerville, Mass. ; Nellie M., the wife of 
Arthur C. Widger, of Longwood, Mass. ; 
Charles P. ; and Hattie P. Both parents are 
members of the Congregational church. 

Charles P. Knowlton completed his school- 
ing at Bryant & Stratton's Commercial Col- 
lege in Boston, whither he went from the pub- 
lic schools of Swampscott. He was then 
employed by Norman Weaver & Co. for a 
time in putting in water-works, and was after- 
ward with Luce & Manning from 1883 until 
1888. Of the following year, six months were 
spent in the capacity of clerk for H. C. 
Thatcher & Co., wool dealers, and the other 
six, in that of salesman for Henry Schmidt, 
of Philadelphia. Returning to Massachusetts 
then, he embarked in business for himself in 
Boston. At the end of four months his health 
gave out; and he went to Duluth, Minn., to 
recuperate. While there he saw notice of a 
vacancy in the city engineer's force, and, 
applying for the situation, secured it. He at 
once began studying engineering, and was 
later made inspector and then the superin- 
tendent of sewer construction. After an ex- 
perience of eighteen months of this work he 
went to Plverett, Wash., as an employee of 
the Everett Land Company, and assisted in 
laying out that city, remaining there four and 
one-half years. During this time he had con- 
tinued the study of engineering, obtaining a 
thorough and practical knowledge of the 
science. Having received word of the serious 
illness of his father, Mr. Knowlton returned 
home in the spring of 1S95. He soon began 



working for the Massachusetts Highway Com- 
mission, and under its direction he built .State 
roads in North Adams, Williamstown, and 
West Newbury. In 1896 he was appointed to 
his present position as Commissioner of 
Public Works. In this capacity he has done 
much to advance the material interests of the 
city and to further its public improvements. 

Mr. Knowlton is a member of Everett 
Lodge, No. 122, I. O. O. P., of Everett, 
Wash., of which he was Noble Grand when he 
came East; of Everett Lodge, K. of P.; and 
of Everett Encampment, I. O. O. F". On 
September 18, 1895, he married Lenor, daugh- 
ter of Josiah Ilatton, of Snohomish, Wash. 
A son, James Adams Knowlton, was born to 
them August 27, 1897. Mr. Knowlton and 
his wife attend the Congregational church. 



r^TENRY P. ARNOLD, the superin- 
|-^4 tendent of the American Tool Com- 
\\s I pany's works at Hyde Park, was 

born May 5, 1850, in Charlestown, 
Mass., son of Isaiah P. Arnold. His paternal 
grandfather, a descendant of an early Massa- 
chusetts family, was a general merchant in 
Charlestown for many years, and died there at 
a comparatively early age, leaving a family of 
ten children. 

Isaiah Arnold was born and brought up in 
Charlestown. In 1853 he removed to Chelsea. 
After conducting a shoe store in Boston for 
some time, he accepted a position as book- 
keeper. In 1861 he changed his place of resi- 
dence from Chelsea to Newton Centre. Five 
years later he came to Hyde Park, which he 
made his home until his death, at the age of 
fifty-six years. He married Miss Sarah E. 
Snow, a daughter of Zenas and Temperance 
(Snow) Snow, who traced their ancestry to a 
passenger of the "Mayflower." Of Isaiah's 
three children two are living, namely: Henry 
P". , the subject of this sketch; and Zenas S., 
a resident of Ouincy, this county. The 
mother, an active woman though seventy 
years old, makis her home with her son 
Henry. She is a consistent member of the 
Baptist church, of which her husband was 
Deacon and treasurer at the time of his 
demise. 



l62 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Henry F. Arnold passed his boyhood in 
Chelsea and Newton Centre, being there edu- 
cated in the public schools. When his par- 
ents removed the family to Hyde Park, he 
went to Boston to learn the trade of a machin- 
ist. His apprenticeship of three years was 
served with Mellen Bray and the succeeding 
firm, Bray & Newell. Then he worked for 
the American Tool and Machine Company, 
and spent a short time with the Brainard Mill- 
ing Company, and in the same season, in 
i86y, began working a.s a journeyman for the 
American Tool Company. Four years later 
he was employed for a while by the Moseley 
Iron Bridge Company, but returned to the 
American Tool Company, with whom he re- 
mained another four years. His health giv- 
ing out, Mr. Arnold was sent to St. Lawrence 
Bay to recuperate. After his return he was 
employed in the grocery business at Hyde 
Park. At the end of the first season he gave 
up this employment, and secured a situation 
with the Peet Valve Company of Roxbury. 
He had worked there si.x months, when he 
again became an employee of the American 
Tool Company, with which this time he was 
connected for several years. He then started 
in business for himself in the manufacture of 
sewing-machine treadles at Norwood, Mass., 
continuing in this enterprise about eight 
months. In the following year he worked for 
the Tubular Rivet Company, after which he 
was employed for a short time in the works of 
the Brainard Milling Company. In 1882 he 
entered the service of the Globe Nail Com- 
pany, being foreman of one of their depart- 
ments four years. In 1886 he re-entered the 
works of the American Tool Company, of 
which four years later he was made superin- 
tendent, an important position which he is 
now ably and satisfactorily filling. This 
plant, which is one of the largest in this sec- 
tion of the county, employs three hundred 
men, all of whom are under Mr. Arnold's con- 
trol. 

On April 10, 1872, Mr. Arnold married 
Miss Caroline ¥. Hibbard, who was born in 
South Boston in 1850, being one of the three 
children of Horatio N. Hibbard, a machinist 
of Hyde Park. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold have 
three children; namely, Helen S. , Henry F., 



Jr., and Gertrude V. In politics Mr. Arnold 
is a decided Republican, and for three years 
has served as Assessor. While liberal in his 
religious views, he is not a member of any 
church. An active worker in the Masonic fra- 
ternity, he belongs to Hyde Park Lodge, V. & 
A. M., in which he is Senior Warden; to 
Norfolk Chapter, R. A. M.; to Hyde Park 
Coimcil, of which he is Thrice Illustrious 
Master; to Cyprus Commandery, of which he 
is treasurer; and to Aleppo Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also an indefatigable 
worker in Forest Lodge, No. 148, I. O. O. ¥., 
having served two terms in the principal 
chairs, besides being secretary of the lodge 
for nineteen years, and District Deputy Grand 
Master for six years. He was likewise a 
member of Shalom Encampment, No. 12, in 
which he held all the ofifices, and had been 
Scribe for five years; and he is a charter mem- 
ber of Monterey Encampment, No. 60, 
I. O. O. v., in which he served as Scribe for 
a number of years, is Past Chief Patriarch and 
Past High Priest, and has been District Dep- 
uty Grand Patriarch. Mr. Arnold was the 
first Commander of the American Legion of 
Honor. Having served for five years in the 
Hyde Park general department, he is now a 
member of the Veteran Firemen's Associa- 
tion. He was also for some years a member 
of the Waverly Club. In 1869 he assisted in 
organizing the Hyde Park Band, of which he 
was the leader for eleven years; and he is now 
a member of the present band. He is like- 
wise a valued member of the Hyde Park His- 
torical Society, and he is one of the directors 
and was the first president of the Employers' 
Benefit Association of the American Tool 
and Machine Company. 




ILLIAM W. BROOKS, a real es- 
tsxi tate dealer in Canton, one of the 
prominent and well-to-do citizens, 
was born in Dorchester, Mass., and came to 
Canton in 1845. His parents were William 
and Mary Ann (Bird) Whittington. 

William Whittington was born and reared 
in Cohasset, Mass., and became a seafaring 
man. After his marriage his family home 
was on Meeting House Hill in Dorchester, his 



i;i()(;rapuical review 



'63 



wife's native place. He still continued 
voyaging, and for some years was captain of a 
vessel engaged in the West India trade. He 
died at sea in 1831, leeiving his widow with 
two children, namely: Amanda, who died in 
1852 in Canton; and William, the subject of 
this sketch. Mrs. Whittington subsequently 
married George W. Brooks, of Medford, 
Mass. ; and both of her children had their 
names changed to accord with hers, the son 
becoming William Whittington Brooks. 

George W. Brooks removed from Medford 
when a young man, and served a full appren- 
ticeship at the carriage builder's and harness- 
maker's trade with T. W. Cross, of Ouincy, 
Mass. Settling then in Dorchester, he 
worked at his trade the greater part of his life 
in that locality. Mrs. Brooks lived to a good 
age, passing away in t'ebruary, 1874. 

William Whittington Brooks attended the 
public schools of Dorchester until sixteen 
years old, when he became a clerk in the shoe 
store of Henry Wenzell on Washington Street, 
Boston, where he remained until about twenty 
years old. After the removal of the family to 
Canton he worked for a time for his step- 
father in this town, and then went to Stough- 
ton, where he was in the shoe trade until he 
was of age. Changing his occupation at that 
time, he began the manufacture of curtain 
fixtures with Uran & Fowle, of Saxonviile, 
but later of Canton, continuing with the fiim 
until 1856, when he was appointed Post- 
master of Canton. He served through the ad- 
ministration of President Pierce, being re- 
moved by President Lincoln in 1861 to make 
room for Rufus C. Wood. In 1857 Mr. 
Brooks opened a drug store in con\pany with 
Dr. Jesse E. Pearce, with whom he subse- 
quently studied medicine; and for thirty-five 
years he was one of the leading druggists of 
this town. He was exceedingly prosperous, and 
invested his money wisely, in 1880 erecting 
the brick block known as Brooks Block and 
the Music Hall. In 1892 he sold out his 
drug business to John W. Tirrell, who was for 
some years his clerk. (See sketch which ap- 
pears elsewhere in this volume. ) Air. Brooks 
has since been engaged in the real estate and 
insurance business, in which he has been very 
fortunate. 



Mr. Brooks married Miss Sarah J. Leavitt, 
daughter of Joseph Leavitt, formerly a promi- 
nent business man of Canton. She died in 
1878, leaving no family. In politics Mr. 
Brooks has always been identified with the 
Democratic party. He has been a candidate 
for the office of Representative to the State 
legislature; and for twelve years he served 
his fellow-townsmen as .Selectman, being 
chairman of the board a part of the time, and 
for fifteen years was Tax Collector. P'rater- 
nally, he is a member of Blue Hill Lodge, 
¥. & A. M. He is an active member of the 
Unitarian church and parish. 



OSEPH HOLMI-:S, the Town Treasurer 
of Milton, was horn November 5, 1825, 
in Pembroke, Plymouth County. His 
parents, John and Margaret (Porter') 
Holmes, were natives of Marshfield, Mass. 
John Holmes was a wheelwright by trade. 
He followed carriage-making for a number of 
years in Pembroke, and then engaged in gen- 
eral mercantile business, keeping a country 
store until his death, which occurred in 1841. 
Of his children there are three survivors, 
namely: John; Joseph, the subject of this 
sketch; and Samuel. John Holmes and bis 
brother Samuel are still residing in Pembroke. 
Joseph Holmes was educated in the common 
schools of his native town, and in his seven- 
teenth year came to Milton, where he entered 
upon an apprenticeship at the tinsmith's trade 
with George Haynes. After serving his time 
and working as a journeyman for a year, h; was 
engaged for a while in the sheet-iron and tin- 
plate business on his own account in Roxbury, 
Mass., and in 1849 went to California by Cape 
Horn, the length of the passage being five 
months and three days. He remained on the 
Pacific coast two and one-half years, either 
working in the mines or following his trade 
until his return East, which was made by way 
of the Isthmus. After a temporary sojourn in 
Milton, he was engaged several years in farm- 
ing in Pembroke, but eventually returned to 
Milton, where he has since resided, with the 
exception of a few years spent in Dorchester. 

In politics Mr. Holmes is independent, vot- 
ini! for the candidates whom he considers best 



164 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



qualified to hold office; and he is now serving 
his tenth year as Town Treasurer. He is a 
self-made man ; and as a progressive and public- 
spirited citizen and a competent and faithful 
official he has gained the esteem, confidence, 
and good will of his fellow-townsmen. For a 
number of years he has acted as a Justice of 
the Peace. He is a member of Macedonian 
Lodge, F. & A. M. 

Mr. Holmes married Elmira W. Sumner, of 
Milton. Two children were born of this 
union, namely: J. Porter; and Nellie, who is 
no longer living. Though not a church mem- 
ber, Mr. Holmes contributes liberally toward 
the support of religious activities, and is a 
trustee of the First Methodist Church Society 
of Dorchester. 



/®^o 



EORGE H. HOLBROOK, of Brain- 
\ '•) I tree, a well-known contractor and 
builder, was born in this town, April 
15, 1852, son of Elias and Susan (Tower) 
Holbrook. His grandfather, Ludovicus Hol- 
brook, was a resident of Braintree, Mass. 
The immigrant ancestor of the family was 
Thomas Holbrook, who was an early settler 
in Weymouth. Savage says that all his chil- 
dren (si.K, including three sons, John, 
Thomas, and William) "were probably 
brought from England." Thomas Holbrook, 
doubtless the second of the name, is men- 
tioned in the Braintree records for the year 
1640. 

Elias Holbrook, who was born in Braintree, 
has diligently followed shoemaking for the 
greater part of his life, and is still residing 
here, being now seventy-five years old. He 
is a veteran of the Civil War, having served 
in the engineers' corps. His wife, Susan 
Tower, who also was born in Braintree, be- 
came the mother of a large family of children, 
of whom six are living, namely: Mary E., 
wife of Henry B. Vinton, of the adjoining 
town of Weymouth; Charles F., who resides 
in Brockton, Mass. ; George H., whose name 
heads this biographical sketch; Eugene W._. 
of Braintree ; PZmma, wife of George E. 
P'uiler, of Melrose; and Hattie, wife of R. A. 
Gage, of Braintree. 

George H. Holbrook, after receiving his 



general education in the public schools of 
Braintree, pursued a business course at 
Comer's Commercial College, Boston, and 
was graduated therefrom. He served a three 
years' apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade 
with A. F". Hannaford, formerly a builder in 
this town, and subsequently became foreman 
for Ira Litchfield, of Ouincy, Mass. In 1886 
he engaged in business for himself; and he 
has since been identified with building opera- 
tions in Braintree and elsewhere, employing a 
large number of men. At the starting of the 
Braintree Co-operative Bank he was chosen 
one of the directors, but did not act as such. 
He is a charter member of Monatiquot Lodge, 
Knights of Pythias, of this town; a member 
of the Grand Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of 
Massachusetts ; and of the Eastern Past Chan- 
cellors" Association of Boston; also a mem- 
ber of P""rancis L. Souther Camp, .Sons of 
Veterans, of Ouincy. 

Mr. Holbrook married Sarah E. Newcomb, 
of Medford, Mass., and has had seven children 
— Alfred H., Irving N., Bessie F., Irene A., 
Clara N. M., Miriam F., and Arthur W.— the 
first five of whom are now living. 




■AMUEL D. CHASE, the present 
chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
of Holbrook, and a member of the 
firm of White & Chase, manufact- 
urers of shoe finishing supplies in Brookville, 
Mass., was born December 17, 1842, in Graf- 
ton, Mass. His parents were Samuel and 
Lydia (Holbrook) Chase, the former a native 
of New Hampshire, and the latter of Brain- 
tree. His father was a shoemaker by trade. 
One of his uncles, William Holbrook, was a 
soldier in the War of 1812. 

When about eight years of age, Samuel 
went to Deering, N.H., where he resided for 
a short time with an uncle. He then came to 
Braintree. Mass., and there received his early 
education in the public schools and at the 
Hollis Institute, which was then located in 
Braintree. He left school at the age of fif- 
teen, and subsequently worked at .shoemaking 
until he joined the Union army for service in 
the Civil War. He served in the First Mas- 
sachusetts Andrew's Sharpshooters, which 




SAMUKL I). CHASE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



167 



was so named in honor of the famous war 
governor. Mr. Chase fought in both the first 
and second battles of Fredericksburg, at 
Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, 
Bristoe Station, Ream's Station, Mine Run, 
and at the siege of Petersburg. At Petersburg 
he was slightly wounded in the left arm by a 
spent ball. His whole time was spent with 
the Army of the Potomac in the Third Brigade 
of the Second Army Corps, and he was a wit- 
ness of the surrender of Lee at Appomattox 
Court-house. In 1865 he was honorably dis- 
charged, and was mustered out on Juno 30 of 
that year. After his return to Braintree he 
was engaged in shoemaking for several years. 
In 1866 he removed to Brookville, where he 
has since resided. About 1870, in company 
with L. A. Hayden, Jr., he engaged in the 
manufacture of boots at Brookville, doing busi- 
ness under the name of Chase & Hayden for 
some three years. At the end of that time 
Mr. Chase became a journeyman shoemaker, 
and subsequently the foreman of the bottoming 
department in the boot and shoe factory of Ed- 
mund White, for whom he worked some ten 
years. 

In 1878, while foreman in Mr. White's 
shop, Mr. Chase was elected a Selectman of 
Holbrook, and served successively for six 
years, being for a part of the time chairman 
and clerk of the board. After an interval of 
five years, during which time he was not hold- 
ing any political office, he was again elected 
Selectman, and as such served for seven suc- 
cessive terms, being a large portion of the 
time chairman of the board. In the spring of 
1897 he was again elected, and is at present 
serving as chairman of the board. F"or three 
years in the seventies he was a member of the 
School Committee, and for seven years he was 
a member of the Board of Engineers of the fire 
department. He has been Justice of the 
Peace for many years, and has done a large 
amount of business in that capacity. In poli- 
tics Mr. Chase is a Republican. He is a 
member of the Industrial and Improvement 
Committee of Holbrook; of the Knights of 
Honor, being charter member of Holbrook 
Lodge; and a charter member of Norfolk 
Lodge, K. of P., and of Brookville Grange, 
P. of H. A self-made man, his success in 



life may be attributed to his energy, intelli- 
gence, and honesty. Mr. Chase was married 
on December 26, 1866, to Mary L. White, a 
native of Holbrook. 




Hi:ODORE R. GLOVER, a retired 
merchant residing on one of the famous 
old Colonial estates of Milton, was 
born November 7, 1824. He is a son of Cap- 
tain Stephen and Rebecca Payne (Gore) 
Glover, and is a lineal descendant of John 
Glover, who came from lingland in the ship 
"John and Mary," commanded by Captain 
Squib, and settled in what is now the town of 
Milton. (.See History of Milton, Mass.) 
Stephen Glover, father of Theodore R. 
Glover, was born in Ouincy, Mass. He was 
a sea captain, and sailed to all quarters of the 
globe. His wife was born in Boston. She 
was a daughter of Samuel Gore, who was a 
member of the Boston Tea Party. She was a 
niece of Christopher Gore, LL. D., who was 
Commissioner to England, 1 796-1 804; Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, 1809; United .States 
.Senator, 18 13-16; and who bequeathed nearly 
one hundred thousand dollars to Harvard 
College. 

Theodore R. Glover passed the greater jjart 
of his boyhood in Roxbury, acquiring his 
education in the public schools. In his 
seventeenth year he first went to sea; and he 
afterward made a number of voyages, in the 
meantime buying shares in vessels until he 
was owner of a number of ships which were 
engaged principally in the East India trade 
and in carrying cotton to Europe. Shortly 
after the close of the war Mr. Glover, having 
been very successful as a business man, retired 
from commercial pursuits. After residing for 
a number of years in Roxbury, spending the 
summers in Hingham, in 1879 he removed to 
his present beautiful country seat in Milton. 
This estate was the home of a number of the 
Colonial governors; and for some time it was 
occupied by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield, an Eng- 
lish clergyman of the Episcopal church. 

On May 26, 1846, Captain Glover was 
united in marriage with Miss Mary T. Mal- 
bon, of Hingham, Mass. ; and on May 26, 
1896, they celebrated their golden wedding. 



1 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



In politics he is independent, voting on prin- 
ciple and not for party feeling. Me is a pub- 
lic-spirited citizen, actively interested in the 
welfare of the town. Captain and Mrs. 
Glover are members of the Unitarian church. 




IRY S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer 
)f Hyde Park for the past twenty- 
three years, was born in Manches- 
ter, N. H., April 6, 1848, son of 
Dr. Sylvanus and Clara (Conant) Bunton. 
His family was of the so-called .Scotch-Irish 
stock, and was undoubtedly represented among 
the stalwart defenders of Londonderry in the 
famous siege of i68g. 

The emigrant Robert Hunton was one of the 
original settlers of Allenstown, Merrimack 
County, N. H. In 1746, while he was work- 
ing with his son on his intervale farm, border- 
ing on the Merrimac River, they were both 
taken captive by Indians and carried by them 
to Canada, where they were held for quite a 
protracted period. The son, the great-grand- 
father of Mr. Bunton of Hyde Park, entered 
the service of the colonies as a Captain of 
militia early in the Revolutionary War, was at 
the battle of Bunker Hill in 1775, and was 
killed at the battle of White Plains in Sep- 
tember, 1776. His son, Andrew, married 
Lavinia Holden, daughter of David Holden, 
who served as First Sergeant during the 
French and Indian War. After his return 
from the army Mr. Holden lived at Town- 
send, Mass. ; but at the outbreak of the 
Revolution his sympathies were with the 
Crown, and so strong was the feeling in his 
neighborhood at that period against the Tories 
that he was obliged to leave his home and re- 
move to Hollis, N. H. 

Dr. Sylvanus, the son of Andrew Bunton, 
was born at Allenstown, N.H., March 8, 1812. 
He acquired a common-school education in 
Goffstown, and, coming to Massachusetts at the 
age of seventeen, learned the stone-mason's 
trade in Ouincy, teaching district schools 
during the winter before he himself had at- 
tended any higher school. In the fall of 1833 
he went to Pembroke Academy to fit himself 
for college; and, entering Dartmouth in 1836, 
he was graduated in 1840. Impaired health 



necessitating a change of climate in 1841, lie 
went to Georgetown, D.C., and was for several 
years teacher in select classical schools at 
Georgetown, at Elk Ridge Landing, Md. , 
and at (Jueen Anne, Anne Arundel County, 
Md. While at the latter place he began 
the study of medicine, attending lectures at 
the Washington University, Baltimore. Here 
he was graduated ; and, being elected a resident 
physician to their hospital, he discharged the 
duties of that jiosition for over a year. Re- 
turning to New Hampshire, he commenced 
practice in Manchester in 1846, which he con- 
tinued until the Civil War, during this time 
holding many responsible positions of the city. 
While living in Manchester, he became con- 
nected with the State militia, and for two 
years held a commission as Major and surgeon 
of the Ninth Regiment. Early in the war his 
patriotism led him to volunteer his services to 
the national cause; and, being commissioned 
by Governor Berry as Assistant Surgeon of the 
Second New Hampshire Infantry, he was iden- 
tified with that regiment in active service until 
June, 1864. When the Second was mustered 
out, he was immediately appointed surgeon of 
the Seventh New Hampshire Regiment; and 
after serving nearly fourteen months he was 
mustered out with the regiment, July 25, 1865. 
He practised his profession in Hollis, N.IL, 
for two years, then, removing to Mont Vernon, 
N.H., there continued in active practice initil 
failing health and disability occasioned by his 
army service compelled him to retire. He 
died August 13, 1884. By his first wife, 
Clara Conant, of Hollis, N.H., whom he 
married December 17, 1846, and who died 
July 3, 1873; he had two sons — Henry Syl- 
vanus and Leonard Jewett, the latter dying in 
infancy. Dr. Bunton's second vvife, whom he 
married in 1874, formerly Miss Sarah Jane 
Trevitt, of Mont Vernon, survives him. Dr. 
Bunton was a man of sincere religious con- 
victions and unquestioned integrity, and of 
humane and benevolent disposition, these 
qualities being peculiarly marked in his con- 
scientious discharge of duty during his army 
service. 

Through his mother's family Mr. Henry S. 
Bunton is descended from the immigrant, 
Roger Conant, who was baptized in the parish 




HENRY S. BUNTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



church of East Biidleigh, Devonshire, I'^ng- 
land, April 9, 1592, youngest of eight children 
of Richard and Agnes (Clarke) Conant. He 
was married in London in November, 1618, 
and came to America in the year 1623, in 
company with John Oldham, at his own ex- 
pense. He did not long remain at Plymouth, 
owing to a difference of religious belief be- 
tween himself and the Pilgrim fathers, who 
were Separatists, while he was a Non-conform- 
ist, or Puritan. He joined Oldham and his 
colony at Nantasket, and lived on (or, as Felt, 
the historian says, "used") Governor's Island 
in Boston Harbor, which was for some time 
known as Conant's Island. During the foL 
lowing winter he was chosen by the Dorchester 
Company to govern their affairs at Cape Ann, 
and he proved himself a prudent ruler and 
skilful peacemaker. The settlers removed to 
Naumkeag, near Salem, in the fall of 1626. 
Mr. Conant was Governor of the colony for 
about three years. "Although he is not uni- 
versally recognized as the first Governor of 
Massachusetts, he is fairly entitled to that 
honor, for the colony of which he was the head 
made the first permanent settlement in the 
Massachusetts Bay territory" (History and 
Genealogy of the Conant Family). His char- 
acter was distinguished by strict integrity, 
great moral courage, and an indomitable will ; 
and he was, as well, tolerant and conciliatory, 
and preferred the public good to his own pri- 
vate interests. He died at Beverly in 1679. 

Henry S. Bunton, a descendant in the eighth 
generation of this distinguished colonist, was 
educated in the Manchester public schools. 
At the age of fifteen he went to Point Look- 
out, Md., and for nine months rendered cleri- 
cal assistance to his father in connection with 
the medical department of the Confederate 
jjrisoners' camp. During this period he con- 
tinued his studies under his father's tuition. 
Appointed hospital steward of the Seventh 
New Hampshire Regiment in December, 1864, 
he served until the war ended. He became a 
resident of Hyde Park in 1866, coming here to 
assume the duties of book-keeper and paymas- 
ter for the Hyde Park Woollen Company, and 
continuing in that capacity until 1875. In 
1871, upon the incorporation of the Hyde Park 
Savings Bank, he was elected first treasurer of 



the bank, and held the office continuously until 
1888, since which time he has been one of its 
trustees and a member of the Board of Invest- 
ment. Upon his retirement from the treasurer- 
ship of the savings bank he became associated 
with Messrs. Robert and John .S. Bleakie as 
treasurer of their mills at Sabattus, Me., styled 
Webster Woollen Company; and this position 
he still occupies. In 1875 he was elected 
Town Treasurer, and at each successive elec- 
tion has been re-elected by a practically unani- 
mous vote. 

l*\)r over twenty-five years Mr. J5unton has 
been an active member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, and has held its highest offices. In 1874 
he was the Commander of Timothy Ingraham 
Post, No. 121, G. A. R. He is also a member 
of the Massachusetts Commandery of the Mili- 
tary Order of the Loyal Legion, the Sons of 
Veterans, and the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. P'or eight years he served Hyde 
Park as a member of its School Committee. 
He is a communicant in the Protestant Iqiisco- 
pal church, and at the present time is a Warden 
and the treasurer of Christ Church, Hyde Park. 
Mr. Bunton enjoys the respect of his fellow- 
citizens in a high degree, and implicit tru.st is 
placed in him as a financier and an honorable 
gentleman. He married November 9, 1880, 
Miss Mary Greenwood Giles, of Winthrop, 
Mass. 



-^OHN H. BURT, of the firm of J. H. 
Burt & Co., contractors and builders of 
Mattapan, Norfolk County, Mass., was 
born in Walpole, N.H., June 6, 1827, 
son of Holland and Nancy (Watkins) Burt. 
The family is said to be of English descent. 
Holland Burt was both a carpenter and cabi- 
net-maker, and followed one or the other of 
these trades throughout his life. Of his chil- 
dren two sons are living; namely, John H. 
and George L., both members of the firm 
above named. 

John H. Burt resided in his native State 
until he reached his seventeenth year, and was 
educated in the common schools, which after 
the age of eight years he attended only dur- 
ing the winter terms. Many New England 
country boys born a half-century and more ago 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



had an experience similar to Mr. Burt's. 
Their school advantages were of the most 
meagre sort; and the prosperity attained by so 
many of them shows that not opportunity, but 
ability and determination to make the most of 
whatever offers, is the foundation of success. 

While a youth Mr. Burt liegan to learn the 
trades in which his father was skilled; and, 
being ambitious and capable, he became an 
expert workman in both carpentry and cabinet- 
making. In 1S50, in company with his 
brother George, he began to engage in con- 
tracting and building at Mattapan, under the 
firm name of J. H. & G. L. Burt. This firm 
existed for a year and a half; and at the end of 
that time Sumner A. Burt, another brother, 
was admitted, the company taking the name of 
J. H. Burt & Co. Sumner Burt died several 
years since, but the name of the firm has re- 
mained unchanged. The business was started 
in a small way; but by degrees it has in- 
creased, until now Messrs. J. H. Burt & Co. 
emjjloy during the busy season from sixty to 
eighty workmen. As both partners are prac- 
tical mechanics and understand every detail of 
construction, they are able to personally direct 
their working force and to secure the best 
possible results. 

Mr. Burt is a Republican in politics. In 
the sixties he served two years as Selectman 
of Milton, and in the seventies and eighties 
he served for eight years. He served as fire 
warden of Milton under a former law, and 
later on was engineer in the fire department. 

Mr. Burt married Mary Cushing, a native 
of Liverpool, England. She was an adopted 
daughter of Isaac Cushing, late of Milton. 
Early called to part with the three children 
born to them, Mr. and Mrs. Burt have but one 
child living, an adopted daughter, Mabel B., 
now the wife of Graham C. Lawson, of Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 



J~\AVID J. PIERCE, a prominent 
=i business man of Weymouth and a 
9y veteran of the Forty-second Massa- 
chusetts Regiment, was born in 
this town, October 2, 1839, son of David J. 
and Nancy (Blanchard) Pierce. His paternal 
grandfather, David Pierce, .Sr., was probably 



a native of Vermont. The family, which in- 
cludes several branches, has been established 
in New England more than two hundred 
years, among the early immigrants bearing 
this surname being: Abraham, of Plymouth, 
1629, and of Duxbury, 1643; John, of Water- 
town; and Thomas, of Charlestown. 

David Pierce, Jr., father of David J. Pierce, 
was born in the vicinity of Lake Champlain, 
and many years after he distinctly remembered 
hearing the roar of artillery at the battle 
fought in the neighborhood of his birthplace 
during the War of 181 2. About the year 
1825 he came to Weymouth, where he fol- 
lowed the stone-cutter's trade for the rest of 
his life, his death occurring in 1848. His 
wife, Nancy Blanchard, who was a native of 
Weymouth, was the mother of several chil- 
dren, four of whom are living, namely: Will- 
iam, who resides at Weymouth Heights; 
Nancy, a resident of Weymouth ; George, who 
lives in California; and David J., the subject 
of this sketch. 

David J. Pierce was thrown upon his own 
resources at an early age, and when ten years 
old he began to learn the shoemaker's trade. 
He attended school at intervals, and, after 
completing his studies, devoted his whole time 
to the shoe business, of which he acquired a 
good knowledge; and for four years he was en- 
gaged in manufacturing upon his own account. 
Afterward he became a photographer, and was 
engaged in that occupation until enlisting as 
a private in Company A, Forty-second Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteers, for service 
in the Civil War. He served under General 
Butler on the Lower Mississippi for a year, 
most of the time on detached duty as a gunner 
at New Orleans. 

After his discharge he engaged in the 
jewelry business in Natick, Mass. Five 
years later he entered the employ of the 
Singer Sewing Machine Company as head 
salesman in Toledo, Ohio; and subsequently 
he was appointed agent of the company in 
Terre Haute, Ind., where he remained for sev- 
eral years, or until failing health caused him 
to return East. He then took the position of 
general manager of the Howe Company for the 
New England States, with headquarters in 
Boston, and had continued with that concern 




*?'!* « 



J. EVERETT SMITH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'7S 



for two years when the feeble state of his 
health compelled him to permanently relin- 
quish the business. For several years he car- 
ried on the drug business in Weymouth, under 
the firm name of D. J. Pierce & Co., also en- 
gaging in the real estate business; anil since 
1892 he has devoted his principal attention 
to the latter enterprise. He was one of the 
organizers and is now treasurer of the Stand- 
ard Rubber Company of Brockton, and is a 
member of the Investment Committee of the 
South Shore Co-operative Bank. 

He is well advanced in Masonry, being at 
the present time Generalissimo of South Shore 
Commandery, Knights Templar; Vice-Presi- 
dent of the South Shore Masonic Relief Asso- 
ciation; and Past Master of Delta Lodge. He 
is also a comrade of Reynolds Post, No. 58, 
G. A. R. 

As a business man he is widely known and 
highly respected for his integrity and regular- 
ity, and as a worthy and useful citizen he 
enjoys the esteem of his fellow-townsmen. 
Politically, he is a Republican. 

Mr. Pierce married Sarah H. Clapp, daugh- 
ter of Charles Clapp, late of Weymouth. 
Four children have been born to them. Three 
died in infancy; and one is now living, a 
daughter, Alice M. Pierce. 



§ EVERETT SMITH, a well-known 
citizen of Dedham, Mass., carrying on 
. an extensive business as a provision 
dealer on Washington Street, is at the 
present time, 1897, chairman of the town 
Board of Selectmen. He was born March 1 i, 
1838, in Norton, Bristol County, Mass., a 
son of Jarvis Smith, and is descended from 
one of the early settled families of Norfolk 
County. His grandfather, Araunah Smith, 
who was born and reared in Dedham, removed 
thence to Norton, where he purchased a farm 
and established a home. He died in 1844, 
aged eighty years. 

His son Jarvis was a lifelong resident of 
Norton, and with the four other children of 
the household was brought up on the home 
farm. In early life he learned the trade of a 
nail-maker, at which he worked for some 
years. Afterward he bought a farm in Nor- 



ton, and engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
his demise, which occurred in 1847 while he 
was yet in the prime of manhood. Jarvis 
Smith married Henrietta Sweet, daughter of 
Hezekiah Sweet, an early settler of Norton. 
All of their children grew to years of maturity, 
and two of them are yet living, namely: J. 
Everett; and Adeline, wife of Stillman A. 
Withcrell. The mother survived her husband 
but a few years, passing away at the age of 
fifty -two. Both parents were members of the 
Unitarian church, and for several years the 
father was a teacher in the Sunday-school. 

J. Everett Smith was but ten years old when 
his father died; and, when the death of his 
mother occurred a few years later, he went to 
live with an older sister, making his home 
with her until si.\teen years of age. From 
that time onward he was self-supporting. He 
worked first as a farm laborer by the month, 
afterward engaging in the ice trade and in the 
butchering business. In 1862, in company 
with a Mr. Brown, he opened a meat market 
in South Dedham, and after a few months pur- 
chased his partner's interest, and carried on 
the business himself for a while. In 1863 
Mr. Smith removed to Dedham, where for the 
first ten years of his residence he sold meat 
from the cart. In this way he won an exten- 
sive trade, gaining the confidence of the 
people with whom he had dealings, either in 
buying or selling, and met with such encourag- 
ing success that he opened his present store 
on Washington Street in 1873. He has grad- 
ually enlarged his business, and has now one 
of the largest and most profitable meat and 
provision trades in this section of Norfolk 
County. He keeps an up-to-date market, 
carrying a full line of first-grade provisions 
and meat, and in addition runs three order 
wagons in this and neighboring towns. His 
sons ably assist him in his work, all being 
kept busily employed. 

On April 26, 1862, Mr. Smith married 
Miss Mary A. H. Wood, who was born and 
bred in Norton, where her father, Ely Wood, 
was for many years station agent. Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith have two children, namely: Lewis 
D. , who married Miss Jennie K. Cassell: and 
Frederick Everett. 

In politics Mr. Smitli is a sound Democrat. 



1^6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



He takes an active and intelligent interest in 
local affairs, uniformly giving his moral sup- 
port and financial aid to works of improvement. 
In 1893 he was elected to the office of Select- 
man, and the succeeding four years was re- 
elected to the same responsible position, the 
last three years being chairman of the board. 
He is quite prominent in Masonic circles, be- 
longing to Constellation Lodge, F. & A. M., 
of which he is Past Master, and is the present 
High Priest of Hebron Chapter, R. A. M. 
He likewise belongs to the Knights of Honor, 
and for the past five years has been Dictator 
of the local lodge. Liberal in his religious 
belief, Mr. Smith with his family attends the 
Unitarian church, of which Mrs. Smith is an 
active member. 



Me. 



-AMES F. PRING, the superintendent 
of the Boston Gossamer Rubber Com- 
pany's factory at Hyde Park, was born 
February 3, 1856, in Kennebunkport, 
A son of John Pring, who is a native of 
Prince Pxlward Island, he is a direct de- 
scendant of Martin Pring, an early explorer. 
John Pring, Sr. , the paternal grandfather of 
James F., spent his long and busy life of four- 
score years on Prince Edward Island, en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. The father, 
John Pring, Jr., was brought up on the home 
farm, and while a resident of his native island 
learned the ship-carpenter's trade. At this he 
worked after removing to the States, first in 
Bath, Me., and later in Kennebunkport, where 
he is now living retired from active life, at 
the good age of seventy-nine years. He mar- 
ried Katherine Campbell, who was also born 
and bred in Prince Edward Island, where her 
father, John Campbell, was a lifelong farmer 
and fisherman. Plight children were born of 
their union; namely, William, Annie (de- 
ceased), John, James F., Mary (deceased), 
Walter S., Robert K., and Thomas. Annie 
was the wife of Robert Delanty. The 
mother's death occurred in the si.xty-fifth year 
of her age. Both parents united with the 
Methodist church in their early years. 

James F. Pring was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Kennebunkport. When old 
enough he began working in the ship-yard 



with his father, learning the trade of a shi))- 
carpenter, which he made his chief occupation 
a number of years. Subsequently, in Bcston, 
he was engaged as a house carpenter and con- 
tractor for ten years, after which he became 
connected with the rubber business as foreman 
of the cutting department in a factory at Hyde 
Park, a position which he held three years. 
During the succeeding three years he was the 
superintendent of the works of the Sterling 
Rubber Company at Framinghani, Mass. 
This position he resigned to accept his pres- 
ent office, the factory of this company being 
then in Readville. In i88g, when the com- 
pany decided to remove their plant to a more 
advantageous location, Mr. Pring was given 
the entire charge of selecting a site and of 
erecting the necessary buildings. Choosing 
the twenty-one acres of land on which the 
plant is located, he erected one building 
ninety-five feet by one hundred and seventy- 
five feet, two stories in height, and another 
in the form of the letter T, forty feet by 
one hundred and forty feet, with an addition 
si.\ty feet by one hundred and forty feet, both 
two stories high. The plant is one of the 
largest in the county. Under his excellent 
management the business has been greatly in- 
creased, and the original force of fifty hands 
greatly augmented, numbering about four hun- 
dred in the busy season. The manufactures 
of this company consist of mackintosh cloth- 
ing. They make a specialty of the first grade 
of goods, which finds a ready sale in the lead- 
ing cities of the United States. 

On August 25, 1875, Mr. Pring married 
Miss Mary E. Kalleher, who was born in New- 
ton, Mass., daughter of Daniel Kalleher, a 
machinist in the Nev/ton foundry, she being 
one of a family of four children. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pring have had two children. George, 
their first-born, died at the age of twenty-one 
years. The other child is a daughter, Eliza- 
beth. In politics Mr. Pring is a steadfast 
Republican, but takes no active part in public 
affairs. Made a Mason in Hyde Park Lodge. 
F. & A. M., he is a member of Royal Arch 
Chapter, of Hyde Park Council, of Cyprus 
Commandery, and of Mecca Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine of Boston. He is likewise a 
charter member of Allen Lodge, I. O. O. F., 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



»77 



and belongs to Waverly Club, in which he was 
chairman of tlie House Committee for three 
years. Both he and his estimable wife are ac- 
tive members of the Methodist church, of 
which he was one of the official board for 
seven vears. 




AVID L. DAVIS, who is now living 
in retirement at Hyde Park, was 
for over fifty-two years in the 
employ of the Boston & Providence 
Railroad Company. He was one of the 
first regular employees of the road, worked 
his way forward to a responsible position, 
and is now one of the few survivors 
of those with whom he was originally 
associated in the service. Born in P^ast 
Washington, N. H., August 3, 181 1, he is a 
son of Edmund and Mary (Graves) Davis. 
His grandfather, Pldmund Davis (first), was a 
native of Hancock, N. H.; and the family de- 
scends from one of the earliest settlers in 
Hillsborough County of that State. The 
grandfather, who was a prosperous farmer and 
a life-long resident of Hancock, reared several 
children. 

Edmund Davis (second), David L. Davis's 
father, was reared upon his father's farm in 
Hancock, and acquired a good education in the 
schools of that town. When a young man he 
was employed as clerk in a store for a 
time, and he also taught school. He finally 
settled in East Washington, N. H., where he 
afterward operated a saw and grist mill until 
his death, which occurred when- he was 
seventy-nine years old. He was considered 
one of the best mathematicians in his locality, 
and was called upon to transact a great deal of 
the town's public business. He was the first 
Postmaster in I-last Washington, and held the 
office for a number of years. His wife, Mary, 
a daughter of William Graves, a lifelong resi- 
dent of East Washington, lived to be ninety - 
two years old. He was one of the organizers 
of the Baptist church in East Washington, and 
he and his wife were active members. They 
were the parents of eight children; and David 
L., the subject of this sketch, is the only one 
now living. 

David L. Davis besfan life for himself when 



a youth, and for a few years he worked in a 
mill in New York State. He then returned 
to his native town, where he completed his ed- 
ucation in the common schools. At the age 
of nineteen he went to Brookline, Mass., 
where he was employed as a farm assistant for 
three years. Again returning to East Wash- 
ington, he worked in his father's mills for 
about three years. In 1836 he entered the 
employ of the Boston & Providence Railroad 
Company, whose line had just been opened, 
p-rom the occupation of track laborer he ad- 
vanced to the position of roadmaster, thence 
in a short time to that of superintendent of 
repairs. During his long connection with the 
road he saw its rolling-stock increase from 
the original two locomotives and eight or ten 
cars to the immense equipment of modern en- 
gines and elegant passenger coaches afterward 
possessed by the road. He saw four tracks 
take the place of the old one-track line, and 
he has witnessed many changes in the Beard 
of Directors and the official heads of depart- 
ments. He has survived more than one gen- 
eration of employers, and continued a faithful 
and highly esteemed servitor of the company 
until 1888, when he retired, after having been 
connected with the road for fifty-two years 
and four months. A settler of Hyde Park 
previous to its incorporation as a town, he has 
seen it grow from a few farm-houses to a com- 
munity of eleven thousand inhabitants. He 
erected his present residence at 66 Milton 
Street in 1846, when that locality was thinly 
populated; and he is now the oldest resident 
in his neighborhood. He was a member of 
one of the first Boards of Selectmen, served as 
an Assessor for one year, and has been a Re- 
publican in politics since the formation of 
that party. 

In 1833 Mr. Davis was united in marriage 
with Olive Shackley, daughter of Aaron 
Shack ley, a native of Norway, Me. Of the 
five children born of the union, Ellerv C, Ed- 
mund, and P"rances E. are living. Ellery 
C, who was formerly a civil engineer, is now 
engaged in agricultural pursuits. He wedded 
Minnie M. Appleton, and has two children — 
P'rances and Jessie. Edmund, who is a well- 
known lawyer of Hyde Park, married Sophia 
H. Chase, and has four sons — Alvan L., Sid- 



i7i 



BIOGRAtHlCAL REVIEW 



ney L., Edward H., and David L. Frances 
E. is the wife of Isaac Bullard, resides in 
Readville, Mass., and has two sons — William 
EUery and Albert D. Mrs. David L. Davis 
died in 1876, aged sixty-five years. Mr. 
Davis is one of the oldest surviving members 
of the Mutual Benefit Society of Railroad 
Men. 



land 



-OHN L. TWIGG, a leading druggist of 
Needham, and a son of Charles and 
Harriet (Co.x) Twigg, was born here in 
1868. The father, a native of Eng- 
who was engaged for many years in the 
manufacture of elastic bandages in this coun- 
try, is still living in Needham. The mother, 
also born in England, died here in 1891. 

John Twigg was educated in the public 
schools of his native town, graduating from 
the high school in 1886. Upon leaving 
school, he entered the drug store of E. J. 
Williams at Newton Highlands, where he was 
engaged as clerk. Two years later he ob- 
tained a similar position in the drug store of 
C. E. Coombs on Massachusetts Avenue, Bos- 
ton. After working there for one year, he 
went back to his former employer. Six 
months later he bought out the store. He had 
carried on the business for one year when he 
sold out, and started a drug store in Needham, 
where he is established at the present time. 
In 1890 he received a certificate from the 
State Board. He joined the Massachusetts 
Pharmaceutical Society some time ago. In 
politics he is an independent. He is a mem- 
ber of the Norfolk Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at 
Needham, in which he holds the office of 
Senior Deacon; of the Newton Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; of the Gethsemane Commandery 
at Newtonville, K. T. ; and of Eliot Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., at Newton Highlands. 



fHOMAS JOEL BAKER, who for more 
than thirty years has been intimately 
associated with the mercantile interests 
of Dedham as one of its leading grocers and 
hardware dealers, was born in Medfield, this 
county, September 25, 1822, son of Joel 
Baker. The paternal grandfather, Joseph 



Baker, was born, lived, and died in West Ded- 
ham, where he was prosperously engaged in 
lumbering during his active life. While 
highly respected, he was familiarly called 
"Uncle Joe."' In his earlier years he made a 
specialty of getting out ship timber, which he 
sold in Boston, using oxen in transporting it 
to the city. He lived to the age of eighty- 
five. 

Joel Baker was one of a family of eight 
children born to his parents. He was a nat- 
ural mechanic, and when quite young learned 
the trades of a boat-builder and carriage- 
maker. The latter he made his principal 
occupation, locating in Medfield, where he 
established a factory, and carried on an ex- 
tensive business, being an especially skilled 
workman. He married Abigail Heaton, a na- 
tive of .Sutton, Mass., whose father, Joseph 
Heaton, was a farmer and for many years a 
Deputy Sheriff. She bore her husband three 
children — Joseph Heaton, Thomas Joel, and 
Julia A. Of these the subject of this sketch 
is the only one now living. The father died 
at the age of seventy-five years, and the 
mother when eighty-four years old. Both 
were faithful members of the Baptist church. 

Thomas J. Baker left home when a boy of 
twelve years to attend school in Charlestown, 
N.H. Three years later he returned to Med- 
field, where he pursued his studies for a time. 
He was subsequently employed for some 
years in general merchandise stores as a clerk, 
first in Medfield, and then in Sherborn, Mass. 
In 1863 he opened a store in Framingham, 
Mass., where he carried on a substantial busi- 
ness until after the close of the late war. 
Disposing of his store there in 1865, he came 
to Dedham, where he has since been located. 
Here, by his sturdy industry, enterprise, and 
honest methods of transacting business, he 
has won the confidence of the public, and built 
up an extensive and profitable trade. He has 
a well-stocked store, including a complete 
assortment of staple and fancy groceries, hard- 
ware of all descriptions, and crockery. In the 
selection of his goods his aim is to please his 
numerous patrons, both as to quality and 
price. 

Mr. Baker was married May i, 1851, to 
Miss Cynthia A. Breck, one of the four chil- 




HEXRV li. HUMPHREY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



iSr 



dren of Joseph Breck, a well-known farmer of 
Medfield. Mr. and Mrs. Baker have five chil- 
dren, namely: F"rederick J., now a cotton 
broker in Texas, who married Miss Fannie E. 
Draper; Edward F. , who is in partnership 
with his father; Julia A.; Sarah 15.; and 
Moses E. In his earlier life Mr. Baker was a 
Whig in politics, but since the formation of 
the Republican party he has been one of its 
strongest adherents. He takes an active in- 
terest in all matters concerning the welfare of 
his town: and for the past eighteen years he 
has held the office of Tax Collector, a longer 
period of continuous service than is recorded 
of any other incumbent. 




"ENRY B. HUMPHREY, of Hyde 
Park, president and general manager 
of the H. B. Humphrey Company, 
Boston, was born in Braintree, 
Mass., November 27, 1865, son of Edward 
I. and Olive W. (Curtis) Humphrey. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, John Humphrey, was a 
shoemaker by trade, and later was a manufact- 
urer of boots and shoes in Milton and Brain- 
tree, Mass. He died November i, 1862. 
John Humphrey was probably a lineal de- 
scendant of Jonas Humphrey, who settled at 
Dorchester, Mass., in 1637, and whose son, 
Deacon Jonas, removed to Weymouth soon 
after 1650. 

Edward I. Humphrey was born in Brockton 
February 15, 1837. After completing his 
education in the common schools, he entered 
the service of the Chickering Piano Company, 
with whom he has remained for the past forty- 
four years, being now salesman at their ware- 
rooms in Boston. He has resided in Hyde 
Park since 1872, and is actively interested in 
public affairs, having served upon the School 
Board and in other town offices. He is a mem- 
ber of the Royal Arcanum. Olive W. Curtis, 
his first wife, who was a daughter of Ira Cur- 
tis, a lumber dealer of Weymouth, Mass., died 
at the age of twenty-six years, leaving two 
children : Henry B., the subject of this sketch ; 
and Olive C, wife of Charles E. Putnam, 
who is with L. I. Thompson, a grocer of 
Hyde Park. Edward I. Humphrey wedded for 
his second wife Mary Dorety, and by this 



union has two sons — Irving W. and Chester 
B. He is an attendant of the Congregational 
church. 

Henry B. Humphrey was educated in the 
public schools of Hyde Park, including the 
high school, and at the age of fifteen began 
work as a clerk in the wholesale dry-goods 
house of Jackson, Mandell & Daniels, Boston. 
A year later he entered the advertising busi- 
ness, first with T. C. Evans; and a year or so 
after he became the representative of a large 
list of circulating mediums. He next entered 
the employ of the Boston Post, where he re- 
mained until September, 1886, when he be- 
came connected with the Davis Advertising 
Agency, which he purchased July i, 1887, 
shortly afterward changing it to the Hum- 
phrey Advertising Agency. Under his able 
and energetic direction, this concern has 
greatly increased its business. Incorporated 
January i, 1894, as the H. B. Humphrey 
Company, it now covers a wide field, and rep- 
resents leading advertisers, constructing and 
placing their announcements in any and all 
newspapers, magazines, and periodicals of the 
United States and Canada. Several assistants 
are employed, the company occupying spa- 
cious quarters at Nos. 72, 73, and 74 Interna- 
tional Trust Company Building, 45 Milk 
Street. Mr. Humphrey is a director in sev- 
eral other companies of Boston. 

Politically, he is a Republican. He is a 
member of Hyde Park Lodge, F. & A. M.; 
Norfolk Chapter, Royal Arch Masons; Hyde 
Park Council and Cypress Commandery, 
Knights Templar. He is also connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the encampment, being Lieutenant Colonel of 
Underwood Canton, No. 61. He is a charter 
member of the local historical society, was 
its first Recording Secretary, and, when 
the twentieth anniversary of the incorpora- 
tion of Hyde Park was observed, he pub- 
lished the history of the town. He is also 
interested in music, the drama, and, as an 
amateur photographer, is a member of the 
Boston Camera Club. 

On August 20, 1888, Mr. Humphrey mar- 
ried Jennie B. Sears, daughter of Eben T. 
Sears. Her father, who was formerly a sea 
captain and vessel-owner, retired from the sea. 



l82 



HIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and for some years was a coal merchant in 
Hyde I'ark, Mass., where his last days were 
spent. Mrs. Humphrey is the mother of two 
children — Evelyn Miller and Ruth I'age. 
Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey attend Christ lOpis- 
copal Cluirch. He was treasurer of the par- 
ish from 1887 to 1889. 




lUTHER ORLANDO EMERSON, 
composer, "whose name has been as- 
sociated with tile musical delights 
■of many years," was born in Par- 
sonsfield. Me., August 3, 1820. His parents 
were Luther and Elizabeth Usher (Parsons) 
Emerson; and on the paternal side his ances- 
try is traced to Thomas Emerson, who settled 
in Ipswich, Mass., about 1635, having come 
over from Durham, England, where lived the 
noted mathematician whose heraldic arms 
were those of Sir Ralph Emerson. The lines 
from this coat -of -arms, we are told, are the 
same that are carved on the tombstone of the 
emigrant's son Nathaniel, who died at Ipswich 
in 17 1 2, aged eighty-three. 

The second in the ancestral line now being 
traced was another son of Thomas — ■ namely, 
the Rev. Joseph Emerson, the first settled 
minister of Mendon, Mass.; the third was his 
son Edward, who was the great-grandfather of 
Ralph Waldo Emerson and the great-great- 
grandfather of Luther Orlando Emerson ; the 
fourth was Edward Emerson's son, the Rev. 
John Emerson, for forty-si.x years minister of 
the church in Topsfield ; and the fifth was Jo- 
seph, who married Lydia Durrell, and lived 
in Alfred, Me. 

Luther Emerson, above named, son of Jo- 
seph and Lydia D. Emerson, and grandson of 
the Rev. John, was a man of pronounced 
views, a strong Whig and abolitionist. In 
religious belief he was a Congregationalist. 
He was married in 1807 to Elizabeth LIsher 
Parsons, daughter of Thomas Parsons, of Par- 
sonsfield. Me. (The Parsons family history 
includes many dLstinguished names. John 
Parsons was Mayor of Hereford in Hereford- 
shire, England, in 148 1. A Parsons coat of 
arms, it is said, was granted by Charles I. in 
1634. An early emigrant, Joseph Parsons 



was a resident of Springfield, Mass., in 1636, 
and died there March 25, 1684.) 

Mrs. Elizabeth U. Emerson's father, 
Thomas Parsons, was born in liradford, Mass., 
September 18, 1735. He married first Anna 
Poor, of Andover, who died May 24, 1783; 
and second, Lucy Bradbury, of Saco, Me., 
who died November 10, 181 1. By his first 
wife he had nine children, by his second, ten. 
Mrs. limerson died in 1857. She was the 
mother of five sons and two daughters, namely : 
Thomas, a clergyman ; Joseph Pratt ; Lucy 
B. , wife of the Rev. Calvin Chapman, of 
Saccarappa, Me. ; Sylvester; Charles H., a 
clergyman, now seventy-nine years of age, liv- 
ing in California; Luther Orlando; and Eliz- 
abeth, who was married first to the Rev. 
Abram J. Bourn, and second to Dr. John 
Moore, of Quincy, 111. Now a widow for the 
second time, she resides in Ouincy, III. 

Luther Orlando Emerson remained on the 
home farm until twenty-one years of age, in 
the meantime attending the common schools 
of his native town, the academy in that place, 
and the academy in Effingham. He then ob- 
tained employment in the Quincy Market, 
Boston, and shortly after, intending to qualify 
for the medical profession, entered Dracut 
Academy, near Lowell, Mass. ; but the pas- 
sion for music was so strong that he finally de- 
cided to perfect himself in that art. Return- 
ing to Boston, he obtained a position in the 
market again, and saved as much of his earn- 
ings as possible. 

In the spring of 1844, he resolutely turned 
his whole attention to music. With his first 
teacher in Boston, I. B. Woodbury, he studied 
vocal and instrumental music — piano, organ, 
and composition — for two years; and he sub- 
sequently studied with other teachers of note. 
He began his work of teaching in Salem, 
Mass., and also took charge of a church choir. 
His compositions were so highly appreciated 
by the choir and congregation that he felt en- 
couraged to prepare a book of church music, 
which was published in 1853. One of the 
tunes in the book was "Sessions," named for 
Mr. Emerson's pastor. This melody was des- 
tined to have perennial popularity; but the 
book, like most first attempts, was not a 
flattering success. Mr. Emerson resided in 



bio(;raphical review 



•83 



Salem eight years, removing tiien to Boston, 
and accepting tiie position of organist and 
musical director in the ]^ulfinch Street 
Church. This position he held four years. 
He was subsequently organist in Greenfield, 
Mass., and teacher in Powers Institute, 
Bernardston. While in (ireenfield his sec- 
ond book of psalmody, "The Sabbath Har- 
mony," was published. It was well received 
by the better class of teachers, and gave him 
a high reputation as a composer of church 
music. In 1857 he formed the connection 
with Oliver Ditson & Co. which has contin- 
ued up to the present time, only one of his 
books having been brought out by another 
firm. The "Golden Wreath," forty thousand 
copies of which sold the first year, was the 
initial vohime in a long series issued by the 
Ditsons. In 1863 this firm published his first 
thoroughly successful church-music book, 
"The Harp of Judah." Thirty thousand 
copies were sold in the first three months. 

His services were now in constant demand 
as a director and leader in musical conven- 
tions, and he gave up teaching to devote his 
whole time to directing and composing. Mr. 
Kmerson stands in the front rank as a con- 
ductor. His first great triumph in this capac- 
ity was at the convention in Keene, N. H., in 
1862. At the convention at Concord, N.H., 
with nine hundred singers, he carried immense 
audiences captive to the splendid harmonies 
evoked under his baton. Mr. Emerson has a 
magnetic personality and wonderful control 
over his singers. He was for several years 
associated with Carl Zerrahn in conducting 
the Worcester Musical Festival. He has con- 
ducted three hundred and fifty musical festi- 
vals, and has had under his direction all of 
the famous singers of America during the past 
thirty years. In festival and convention work 
he has been associated with Dudley Buck, 
W. O. Perkins, Solon Wilder, and H. R. 
Palmer, of New York, names famous in musi- 
cal circles. He is still teaching vocal music, 
and has several musical works begun. 

Among his compositions, "Sessions," 
"Guide me, O Thou Great Jehovah," and 
"Oh, praise the Mighty God, all ye Nations," 
it may be said, will live forever. The last- 
named number was composed for the grand 



Worcester Festival, and was sung by five hun- 
dred voices, under the author's leadership. 
Among his secular compositions perhaps the 
best known is "Star of Ascending Night." 
He has completed sixty-seven works in all, 
has written twelve church music books, ten 
singing-schoo! ijooks, eight anthem books, fif- 
teen public-school singing-books, four Sab- 
bath-school books, two glee books, four books 
of selections for male voices, two instruction 
books for the voice and one for the organ, 
several chorus books, and one mass published 
and two in preparation. 

He was married March 4, 1847, to Mary J., 
daughter of John and Mary (Burgess) Gove. 
Mr. Gove was a prominent Boston merchant. 
Si.\ of the seven children bora of their union 
are living. The eldest, Mary Gove, mar- 
ried first Edgar Clark, of Framingham, by 
whom she had two children; and, second, 
William Jones, of Framingham, Mass. .She 
is now again a widow. She is a writer on the 
Boston Herald staff, and is a talented musi- 
cian. John G. Emerson resides in Quincy, 
Mass. Luella P., wife of the late Robert 
Davie, of New York, is a music teacher, and 
has been remarkably successful as a leader of 
ladies' choruses. Charles W. Emerson is in 
business in Boston. Abbie died in infancy. 
Elizabeth, also a talented musician, received a 
diploma and bronze medal at the World's I*"air 
in Chicago in 1893. She has written two 
books for schools which are very popular. 
The youngest daughter, Mabel H., is highly 
cultured, and had she had the physical 
strength would have made her impress upon 
the literature of the day. 

On March 4 of the present year, 1897, Mr. 
and Mrs. Emerson celebrated their golden 
wedding at their pleasant home in Hyde Park. 
Mrs. Thomas Green, of Chelsea, Mass., who 
acted as bridesmaid fifty years ago, received 
with Mrs. Emerson. The Rev. Alexander 
Archibald, of Hyde Park, read a poem written 
for the occasion by the Rev. Minot J. Savage, 
of New York; and other poems were contrib- 
uted by Mrs. S. H. R. Giles, General H. B. 
Carrington, and Miss Harriet Wheeler, of 
Florida, N.Y. There was also a wedding 
song, composed and set to music by Mrs. Clara 
Sothy, of Chicago. 



i84 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



The degree of Doctor of Music was recently 
conferred upon Mr. Emerson by the faculty of 
Findlay College, Findlay, Ohio. Successful 
to a remarkable degree, his relations with all 
have always beeil tempered with singular 
modesty, thoughtfulness, and benevolence. 
He is kindly, charitable, liberal, with a strong 
brain, a warm heart, and a brave and generous 
personality. 




ON. JOSIAH GARDNER ABBOTT, 
LL. D., sometime Judge of the Su- 
perior Court of the city of Boston, 
and later for many years a leading 
member of the Suffolk County bar, was born 
at Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Mass., No- 
vember I, 1814, and died at his summer home 
at Wellesley Hills, Norfolk County, July 2, 
1891. He was the second son of Caleb and 
Martha (Fletcher) Abbott, and on both pater- 
nal and maternal sides was of English Puritan 
and early Colonial stock. His father was a 
son of Caleb, Sr., and Lucy (Lovejoy) Abbott, 
and was si.xth in lineal descent from George 
Abbot, who settled at Andover, Mass., in 
1643, the intervening ancestors being: Timo- 
thy; Timothy, Jr.; and Nathan, father of 
Caleb, Sr. William Fletcher, the immigrant 
progenitor of his mother's family, settled in 
Chelmsford in 1653. He owned a large part 
of the territory now included in the city of 
Lowell. Judge Abbott's grandfathers both 
fought in the Revolutionary War. 

The best of home influences, a village li- 
brary, and a classical school taught for a time 
by Ralph Waldo Emerson and afterward by 
the Rev. Abiel Abbot of honored memory, 
contributed to develop the mind and form the 
character of Josiah G. Abbott. tie was grad- 
uated at Harvard in 1832, began the study of 
law in the office of Joel Adams, of Chelms- 
ford, in 1834 entered the law office of Na- 
thaniel Wright in Lowell, and in January, 
1837, was admitted to the Middlesex bar. He 
served as Associate Justice of the Superior 
Court of Suffolk County from 1855 till Janu- 
ary t, 1858, when he resigned to resume the 
more lucrative practice of law, being from that 
time on a distinguished member of the Suffolk 
County bar. His first law partner was Amos 



Spaulding, and his second, 1842-55, .Samuel 
A. Brown. 

A Jacksonian Democrat in politics, a firm 
believer in the principles of self-government, 
he was a strong Union man and ever faithful 
to the duties of citizenship. He served as a 
Representative in the State legislature in 
1837, as Senator in 1842 and 1843, ^n^ ^s 
delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 
1853; was elected to Congress in 1874, and 
chosen a member of the Electoral Commission 
in 1877. In 1840, as editor of the Lowell 
Advertise); he advocated the re-election of 
President Van Buren; in 1848, as a "bolter," 
he supporter the Free Soil nominees. Van 
Buren and Adams; and in i860, "as a choice 
of evils, he voted the Douglas ticket." He 
was a delegate to seven Democratic National 
Conventions, and in six of them was chairman 
of the Massachusetts delegation. 

Judge Abbott served as an overseer of Har- 
vard College, 1859-65, his removal from 
Lowell to Boston occurring in 1861. In 
1862 he received from Williams College the 
degree of Doctor of Laws. Among the busi- 
ness enterprises with which he was connected 
may be named the Hamilton Manufacturing 
Company at Lowell, of which he was presi- 
dent, 1860-62; the Atlantic Cotton Mills at 
Lawrence, of which he was president, 1861- 
y6; the Hill Manufacturing Company, Lewis- 
ton, Me., of which he was a director thirty-five 
years and from 1874 till his death its presi- 
dent; the Union Power Company at Lewiston; 
and the Boston & Lowell Railroad, of which 
he was a director, 1857-85, and president, 
1879-84. 

For the foregoing facts and for the follow- 
ing estimates of the character and career of 
this eminent jurist we are indebted to the 
"In Memoriam " volume containing the mem- 
oir of Judge Abbott by the Hon. Charles 
Cowley and tributes from notable contempo- 
raries. 

"Judge Abbott's reputation as a lawyer was 
won in the court-room, not in the closet. En- 
dowed by nature with a body and mind of 
great vigor, with never-satisfied ambition and 
untiring powers of work, he early came in con- 
flict with the most prominent lawyers of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



187 



Middlesex bar, and proved himself an oppo- 
nent worthy of their steel. . . . 

"His power of statement of mixed c|ucstions 
of law and facts was unrivalled. None knew 
better than he how to elicit facts from a reluc- 
tant or dishonest witness; and his ajjpeals to 
juries were always forcible and judicious, and 
met with merited success. For many years he 
was one of the most trusted counsellors and 
advocates of the Suffolk bar." — Hon. L. J. 
Stockpoi.e. 

"In his bearing to the court he was always 
respectful, and in his relations to the bar he 
never forgot those courtesies which give grace 
to professional intercourse and lighten profes- 
sional labors. In the conduct of business he 
was always controlled by the highest prin- 
ciples of honor and fair dealing. When fill- 
ing the high position of judge, he discharged 
its difficult and laborious duties to the satis- 
faction of the profession; for he possessed, in 
an eminent degree, those valuable judicial 
virtues — patience, impartiality, and indus- 
try."— Hon. F. O. 1'rince. 

"So, too, in political action, he was faith- 
ful and firm. He was pre-eminently a man 
for a crisis. This is proved by many points in 
his career, notably in 1861 and 1877. In such 
times he never hesitated or faltered. He 
loved his party, but he loved his country 
more. . . . On the altar of his country he 
offered up with the firmness of a Roman father 
the children he loved with more than Roman 
tenderness." — F. T. Greenhalge. 

He was married July 21, 1838, to Miss 
Caroline Livermore, daughter of the Hon. Ed- 
ward St. Loe Livermore. Eleven children 
were born of this union, and nine grew to ma- 
turity, two sons having died in childhood. 
Two sons, Edward G. and Henry L. , laid 
down their lives for their country on Southern 
battle-fields; and one daughter, Caroline 
Mercy, died after marriage. The survivors 
are : Fletcher Morton ; Samuel Appleton 
Brown; Franklin Fierce; Grafton St. Loe; 
Holker Welch; and Mrs. Sarah Abbott Fay, 
widow of William P. Fay. Mrs. Caroline L. 
Abbott died in the autumn of 1887. A su- 



perior woman, of great sweetness and strength 
of character, in her loss Judge Abbott 
"suffered the greatest affliction of his life." 

Fletcher Morton Abbott, born in Helvidere, 
Mass., February 18, 1843, was educated in 
the Lowell public schools and St. Paul's 
Academy, Concord, N.H. In 1861 he en- 
listed in Company D, under Captain Savage, 
Second Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteers, 
in which he served three years, being in en- 
gagements at Harper's Ferry and in the Shen- 
andoah Valley campaign. He entered the 
medical department of Harvard University in 
1874, and took his degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1875. He has since lived retired. 

Samuel Appleton Brown Abbott, born in 
1846, was graduated at Harvard in 1866; stud- 
ied law in his father's office, and was ad- 
mitted to the Suffolk bar in 1868; has since 
practised in Boston and in the United States 
Courts; was for ten years trustee of the Boston 
Public Library and si.x years j^resident of the 
board. He is married, and has four children. 
Edward Gardner Abbott, eldest son of the 
Hon. Josiah G. and Caroline (Livermore) 
Abbott, was born in Lowell, September 29, 
1840. Remarkably active, both physically 
and mentally, before he was ten years old he 
had read all the Waverley novels. He was 
fitted for college at the Lowell High School, 
and, entering Harvard, was graduated in i860. 
A diligent student, he was also a good oars- 
man, and belonged to the 'Varsity crew. En- 
tering the law office of S. A. Brown in Low- 
ell, he applied himself from ten to twelve 
hours a day to the study of law, continuing 
thus engaged till the breaking out of the Re- 
bellion. He then recruited a company, called 
the Abbott Grays, of which he was commis- 
sioned Captain on May 24, 1861, the company 
being attached to the Second Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry. He was brevetted Major 
in August, 1862, and was killed August g, 
1862, at the battle of Cedar Mountain, Va. 
It has been said of him that he was a "born 
commander, cool, intrepid, self-reliant, in- 
domitable," a man who "took to leadership 
of affairs as natural Iv as an eagle takes to the 
air." 

Henry Livermore Abbott, born in Lowell, 
January 21, 1842, was graduated at Harvard 



i88 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in i860. He was of a social, genial nature, 
and a general favorite. Like his elder 
brother, he took a good deal of interest in 
athletic sports. He also began the study of 
law, but early laid aside his books to engage 
in the war for the Union. In July, 1861, 
commissioned Lieutenant in Company A of 
the Twentieth Massachusetts, he took part in 
the battle of Ball's Bluff, and was soon after- 
ward in command of his company. He was 
present and active in nearly all the principal 
battles of the Army of the Potomac, and his 
military genius and ability were pronounced 
of the highest order. He was killed at the 
battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1S64, aged 
twenty-two years, and after his death was 
brevetted Brigadier-general. His company, it 
is said, was the pride of the regiment. "Had 
he lived and continued the profession of arms," 
said General Hancock, "he would have been 
one of the most distinguished commanders." 



INOCH HALL DOBLE, a well-known 
and prominent business man of Ouincy, 
Norfolk County, Mass., who is 
senior member of the firm of E. H. Doble & 
Co., and is also a partner in the firm of A. H. 
Doble & Co., was born March 13, 1821, in 
Livermore, Me., son of Aaron and Abigail 
(Hall) Doble, and a grandson of William 
Doble. 

Aaron Doble was born, bred, and educated 
in Sumner, Oxford County, Me., growing to 
man's estate on the home farm. He learned 
the carpenter's trade; but, having much nat- 
ural ingenuity, he gave much of his time to 
the making of a variety of articles, includipg 
wooden ploughs, which, it was said, were the 
best used in that locality. One of the first to 
espouse the cause of the Free Soil party, he 
continued a stanch supporter of its policy. 
He was actively interested in the welfare of 
his town, and served in some of its minor 
ofifices. On March 11, 1809, he married Abi- 
gail Hall, who was born December 3, 1790, in 
Buckficld, Me., daughter of Enoch Hall. 
Their children were: Miriam, deceased, born 
Augu.st 27, 18 10, who became the wife of 
John Godding, of Livermore, Me. ; Sarah, de- 
ceased, born July 2, 1812, who married 



Nathan Deals; John, deceased, born August 
23, 1814; Mary, deceased, born December 11, 
1 8 16, who became the wife of Joshua Spear, 
of Quincy, Mass. ; Henry Parsons, deceased, ^^ 
born January 25, 1819; Enoch Hall, the sub^ 
ject of this sketch; Delphina Parish, de- 
ceased, born March 13, 1821, who married 
John H. Ward; William, deceased, born 
September 24, 1826; Cynthia Green, born 
July 27, 1829, who married Daniel Ward, of 
Wellington, Me.; Vesta Jane, deceased, born 
August 20, 1831; and Elvira Varnum, born 
July 22, 1833, who is the wife of Frank 
Gordon, of Livermore, Me. The mother died 
May 27, 1855. The father died February 3, 
1 86 1. Both parents were regular attendants 
of the meetings held each Sunday in the dis- 
trict school-house, but neither was a church 
member. 

linoch Hall was born November 10, 1763, 
in either Falmouth or Windham, Me. In 
1780 he enlisted from the latter town in the 
Continental army as a private, and served 
until the close of the war of independence. 
Soon afterward, for five hundred dollars, he 
bought a tract of almost wild land in Buck- 
field, on which were a rude log cabin, ten 
acres of felled trees, and a yoke of oxen. In 
the spring of 1784 he removed the trees al- 
ready felled, and in the ensuing season raised, 
on the ten acres they had occupied, two hun- 
dred bushels of corn. From Windham, in 
the fall of 1784, he brought his wife, Miriam 
F"urbish Hall, together with his household 
goods, including a bushel of salt, upon the 
backs of two horses, arriving at the little log 
cabin on his twenty-first birthday. He wore 
a tow frock all the following winter. Next 
spring, he having invested two dollars that he 
had saved in two sheep, his wife made from 
the fleeces of the latter a piece of "waled 
cloth," and from the cloth a new suit of 
clothes. Enoch wisely made it one of the 
rules of his life never to buy anything for 
which he could not pay at the time of pur- 
chase. In the spring of 1785, working day 
and night while the season lasted, taking 
turns in sleeping and laboring, he and his 
wife made three hundred pounds of maple 
sugar and twelve gallons of maple molasses, 
boiling the sap in a new iron kettle in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



189 



cabin. In the spring of 1786 he built a barn, 
covering it with long shingles made by him- 
self. At the end of nine years he replaced 
the humble cabin with a substantial frame 
house, which was thereafter his residence 
until his death, December 10, 1835. His 
widow survived but a few years. The only 
school he ever attended was one kept in his 
own house for a period of three weeks by 
Elder D. Hutchinson, he and his three elder 
children, Dolly, Ruth, and Abigail, being 
the pupils. Here he gained some knowledge 
of arithmetic, and learned to write. With 
this slight aid he subsequently educated him- 
self, becoming qualified to instruct his 
younger children, and to hold many important 
and useful positions in his after life. F"or 
many years he was one of the Selectmen of 
Buckfield, and served repeatedly in other 
offices. It is said of him that he exercised a 
remarkable influence among his townsmen, 
who seemed to consider his judgment almost 
infallible. He was several times sent to Bos- 
ton as a member of the General Court while 
Maine was a province of Massachusetts. He 
was a member of the convention that framed 
the Constitution of Maine in [819 and 1820, 
and represented Buckfield in the first legislat- 
ure of the State in 1821. Nine children were 
born to him and his wife, namely: Dolly, 
who died at the age of twelve years; Ruth, 
born February 17, 17S8, who married Hol- 
lingsworth Hines; Abigail, who became the 
wife of Aaron Doble; Andrew, born January 
9, 1792; John, born November 14, 1795; 
Winslow, born June 16, 1798; Dolly (sec- 
ond), born August 24, 1801, who married 
Daniel Brown; Zilpha, born June 8, 1804, 
who married Simon Brown; and Hiram, born 
September 29, 1806. 

Enoch Hall's father, Hatevil Hall (third), 
was born in Dover, N.H., March 24, 1736. 
He lived at various times in Windham, Buck- 
field, and Brooks, dying in the latter place 
May 10, 1804. In 1754 he married Ruth, 
daughter of Job and Margaret (Barbour) 
Winslow. .She died June 11, 1798, leaving 
among other children a son named Enoch. 
The maiden name of the second wife of Hate- 
vil Hall (third) was Ann Jenkins. Hatevil 
Hall (second) who was born in Dover, N. H., 



February 15, in either 1708 or 1709, died No- 
vember 28, 1797, leaving four hundred and 
seventy-five descendants. He was either a 
turner or chair-maker by trade, and a promi- 
nent member of the Society of Friends. On 
April I, 1733, he married Sarah Furbush, 
who died March 2, 1790. Both he and his 
wife were remarkably open-hearted, generous, 
and hospitable people. Hatevil Hall (first), 
the father of the preceding bearer of the name, 
married Mercy Cornwall, and lived at J31ack 
River. According to tradition, he was 
drowned in early manhood, leaving but the 
one child. John Hall, the immigrant founder 
of the Hall family, was born in 1617. He 
served as Town Clerk, Lot Layer, Commis- 
sioner, and Selectman. His son, Hatevil 
(first), was his third child. 

Enoch Hall Doble was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Livermore, Me., and remained 
beneath the parental roof until twenty years of 
age. Coming then to Boston, he shipped for 
one summer with his brother John, who ran a 
packet between Boston and Cohasset. In the 
following sunnner he worked on the farm of 
his brother-in-law, Joshua H. Spear, in 
Ouincy. Going thence to Braintree, he started 
in the meat business on his own account, con- 
tinuing about a year. Returning then to 
Livermore, he bought a farm, and was there 
engaged in agricultural pursuits six or more 
years. Having disposed of his farm at the 
end of that period, he came again to Ouincy, 
purchased the store of his brother Henry, and 
with the exception of four years has since 
continued in mercantile business at the stand 
now occupied by the firm of E. H. Doble & 
Co. This firm was formed in 1874, when Mr. 
Doble admitted into partnership his son Her- 
bert. It carries a fine line of general mer- 
chandise, including hay and grain, and em- 
ploys about sixteen hands, their trade being 
both wholesale and retail. In 1890 Mr. 
Doble's son, William H. Doble, opened the 
store now occu])ied by the present firm of 
A. H. Doble & Co.; and in 1893 the firm of 
W. H. Doble & Co. was incorporated. In 
February, 1896, the stock of that firm was 
purchased by Mr. Doble and his son, Arthur 
H., with whom he formed a partnership under 
the name of A. H. Doble & Co. This firm 



igo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



also handles general merchandise, and is 
carrying on an extensive wholesale and retail 
business, keeping fourteen clerks busily em- 
ployed. 

In politics Mr. Doble has been actively 
identified with the Republican party since he 
cast his first Presidential vote for General 
J. C. Fremont. He married Rachel, daugh- 
ter of James Timberlake, of Livermore, Me. 
Of his six children Herbert F., Ernest E., 
William H., and Arthur H. are living. 
Ernest E. is a physician in Boston. Arthur 
H., who was born January 5, 1870, after 
graduating from Adams Academy in 1888, en- 
tered his father's store, and is now in partner- 
ship with him. He married Lucy, daughter 
of William N. Eaton, of this city; and they 
both attend the First Church. Mr. and Mrs. 
Doble are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, of which he has been for several 
years a trustee. 



fOSEPH FISHER, late a prominent citi- 
zen and lifelong resident of Dedham, 
was born here, July 21, 1 805, son of 
Benjamin and Nabby (Baker) Fisher, 
and died on August 13, 1880. 

He was of ancient and honorable Colonial 
stock, on his father's side tracing his lineage 
back through six generations in Norfolk 
County, Massachusetts, to Anthony Fisher, 
who owned and occupied the estate in Syle- 
ham, Suffolk County, England, called " Wig- 
notte, " and on his mother's side counting 
among bis ancestors prominent members of 
the "Mayflower" company. Anthony Fisher' 
married Mary Fiske, of St. James, South 
Elmham, Suffolk County, England. Their 
son Anthony,^ the emigrant, was baptized in 
1 591, and came to the Massachusetts Colony in 
the ship "Rose" in 1637. He first settled 
in Dedham, but subsequently removed to Dor- 
chester, where he died April 18, 1671. He 
had a son Anthony,' who married Joanna 
Faxon on September 7, 1647. She was born 
in Braintree, now Quincy, in 1626, and died 
October 16, 1694, her husband having died 
the year before his father. The next in line 
was their son Eliezer," born September 18, 
1669. He was married on October 13, 1698, 



to Mary Avery, who was born in Dedham, 
August 21, 1674, daughter of Deacon Will- 
iam and Mary (Lane) Avery. He died Febru- 
ary 6, 1722, and she on March 25, 1749. 

Benjamin,' their youngest son, was born in 
Dedham in May, 1721. He married in 1742 
Sarah Everett, who was born in Dedham, June 
7, 1718, daughter of William and Rachel 
(Newcomb) E'verett, and grand-daughter of 
Captain John Everett, whose father, Richard 
Everett, was one of the founders of Dedham. 
Benjamin Fisher died January 18, 1777, and 
his widow on August 2, 1795. The next in 
line was their son Asa,'' born April 30, 1745, 
who was well educated, and amassed a consider- 
able fortune for his day. On July 2, 1767, he 
married Elizabeth Draper, whose birth occurred 
in Dedham, January 16, 1747. Her parents 
were Daniel and Rachel (Pond) Draper. Asa 
Fisher died April 2, 1823, and his wife on 
October 26, 1813. 

Benjamin Fisher,' son of Asa and Elizabeth, 
and the father of Joseph Fisher'* of this sketch, 
was born February 23, 1777, and was united 
in marriage with Miss Nabby Baker on May 
13, 1801. She was born November 5, 1778, 
daughter of Joseph and Monica (Gay) Baker. 
Monica Gay, who was born in Attleboro, 
Mass., in 1754, daughter of Jabez and Hannah 
(Bradford) Gay, was a descendant of Governor 
Bradford, also, it is said, of John and PrisciJla 
(Mullins) Alden. One ancestral line is thus 
briefly given : her mother was a daughter of 
Perez and Abigail (Belcher) Bradford, and a 
grand-daughter of Samuel Bradford, of Dux- 
bury, who was a grandson of William Bradford, 
the second Governor of Plymouth Colony. 
Benjamin Fisher' died July 5, 1829, aged fifty- 
two years. 

In early life Joseph Fisher, the subject of 
this sketch, began business as a manufacturer 
of carriages and harnesses in West Dedham. 
He had followed the business but a few years 
when on account of his health he was advised 
to seek an occupation that would permit of his 
spending more time in the open air, and he 
afterward dealt in horses quite extensively. 
He purchased his father's homestead on High 
Street, West Dedham, and subsequently lived 
there. 

Joseph Fisher was twice married, his first 




ALBERT M. MILLER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'93 



union being witii Miss Hannah Baker, by 
whom he had one son, George Fisher. His 
second wife, who survives him, was Mary Eliz- 
abeth Campbell before marriage. She was 
born in Harrington, now Millbridge, Washing- 
ton County, Me., daughter of Colin Campbell, 
who was a native of the same town. His 
father, James, born February g, 1761, was a 
son of Ale.xander Campbell, Jr., one of the 
early settlers in Maine, who in turn was the 
son of Alexander and Frances (Drummond) 
Campbell. 

Alexander Campbell, Jr., was a Brigadier- 
general in the Revolutionary War. In 1758 
he married Elizabeth Nichols, with whom he 
jived almost fifty years, his death occurring in 
1807, and hers four years later, in 181 1. 
James Campbell, Mrs. Fisher's grandfather, 
was very prominent in public affairs, and served 
several terms as a member of the Massachu- 
setts legislature, making the journey to and 
from his home in Maine on horseback. He 
was also a Judge in the local courts. On 
August 24, 1788, he married Susanna Cofifin, 
of Nantucket, Mass. He died July 7, 1826, 
and she on September 24, 1833. Colin Camp- 
bell, after completing his school education at 
Blue Hill Academy, taught school for awhile. 
As a life work he chose farming; but much of 
his time was given to official duties, including 
those of Town Clerk and other local offices. 
He married Sally Griggs Ricker, who was 
born in Cherryfield, Me., daughter of Amaziah 
and Susanna (Baker) Ricker, the last named a 
native of West Roxbury, Mass. 

Four children were born to Joseph and Mary 
E. (Campbell) Fisher: Hattie Smith; Joseph 
Lyman; Elizabeth Campbell; and May Camp- 
bell, who died at the age of twelve years. 
Hattie S. Fisher married George Henry Smith, 
a native of Halifax, England, who is now a 
manufacturer in Halifax, England. Joseph 
Lyman Fisher is a farmer, and has a handsome 
house on Main Streef, West Dedham. 

In politics Joseph Fisher was a lifelong 
Republican. He was a trustee of Dedham 
Savings Bank, a director of Dedham National 
Bank, also of Norfolk Insurance Company and 
the Mutual Insurance Company of Dedham. 
He was a prominent member of the Unitarian 
church, and a man of pronounced public spirit. 




LB]':RT MONROE MILLER, M.D., a 
well-known and esteemed physician of 

Needham, nephew of Dr. Albert E. 

Miller, was born in the town of 
Virgil, Cortland County, N.Y., August 30, 
1857, son of George W. and Lucinda (Wood- 
ard) Miller, and grandson of Ezekiel Miller. 
His father was a farmer, born in the town of 
Covert, Seneca County, N.Y.; and his mother 
was a daughter of Archibald and Betsey (Ben- 
ton) Woodard, of Virgil. 

Albert M. Miller received his first school 
training in his native town, and when only 
thirteen years of. age came to Massachusetts, 
and attended successively a grammar school in 
Weston, Middlesex County, where he spent 
about a year, and Willow Park Seminary in 
Westboro, where he was graduated in 1875. 
Returning to his old home in Virgil, his 
father having died during his absence, he then 
attended the Cortland State Normal School 
for a year, and at the end of that time came to 
Needham to make his home with his uncle, 
Dr. Albert E. Miller, and to begin the study 
of medicine. For about five years he travelled 
much as advance agent for the lecture tours of 
his uncle, and at the same time pursued a reg- 
ular course of study. He then attended med- 
ical lectures at the Maine Medical College 
in Brunswick and at Dartmouth College, 
graduating from the last-named institution in 
1881, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
After several months' experience as an assist- 
ant physician in the McLean Asylum Hospi- 
tal and a brief period in Chesterfield, Hamp- 
shire County, Mass., he came back to Need- 
ham, and was with his uncle until 18S3. In 
that year he removed to Waltham, where he 
practised until the latter part of 1S84, when 
he returned to Needham. The thirteen years 
that have since elapsed have been years of use- 
ful activity and progress. 

Dr. Albert M. Miller is a physician of the 
regular school, and by his skill and natural 
aptness for his profession has gained a large 
and steadily increasing practice. He has been 
a member of the Needham Board of Health 
for ten years, and in this position has served 
the town with the utmost faithfulness. In 
politics the Doctor is a Republican. He is a 
member of Norfolk Lodge of F. & A. M., 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



having joined the organization in 1883; also 
a member of Eliot Lodge, No. 58, I. O. O F., 
of which he is Past Grand; and member of the 
U. O. G. C, an insurance society. He was 
graduated from the C. L. & S. C. of New 
England in 1888. 

Dr. Miller and Isabelle B. Mann, daughter 
of Daniel F. Mann, of Needham, were mar- 
ried on January 26, 1887. They have one 
child, Harold Lionel Miller, born January 7, 
1895. 



i^^ EORGE THOMAS MAGEE, a well- 
Sl known journalist residing in (Juincy, 
Mass., was born in the adjacent town 
of Hingham, August 9, i860, being the only 
son of Thomas and Caroline (Penniman) 
Magee. His father, a native of Braintree, 
Mass., was born March 14, 1825, son of 
Thomas and Elizabeth Magee; and his mother 
is a daughter of Stephen Penniman. An ac- 
count of her ancestry may be found following 
this sketch under the title of " James Penni- 
man. " 

Mr. Magee has two sisters: Susan Caroline, 
born in Ouincy, May 21, 1852; and Eliza 
Maria, born in Hingham, May 19, 1856. 
Susan Caroline Magee was married at Hing- 
ham, December 2, 1875, to William Howard 
North, who was born in Watertown, Mass., 
January i, 1853, son of Richard and Rebecca 
(Tupper) North. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. North 
have two children : Grace Caroline, born in 
Quincy, January 23, 1877; and Howard Mann- 
ing, born in Ouincy, June 28, 1879. Eliza 
Maria Magee was married in Quincy, Novem- 
ber 7, 1883, to Charles Barrett Tilton, who 
was born in East Boston, May 16, 1858, a son 
of Thomas Barrett and Maria Melvina (Ams- 
den) Tilton. Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Tilton have 
one child — • Irma Caroline, born in Quincy, 
June 5, 1887. 

George Thomas Magee' s parents moved to 
.Quincy when he was a child ; and with the ex- 
ception of three years in the seventies, which 
were spent in Hingham, and five years in the 
eighties, when he lived in East Weymouth, he 
has had his home in this town. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Quincy and 
Hingham. After leaving school, he was first 



employed as an operator by the Telephone 
Despatch Company of Boston, with whom he 
remained until 1886. Having a taste for 
newspaper work, he seized the first opportunity 
of entering upon that sphere of activity by ac- 
cepting a position on the staff of the Wey- 
mouth Crt.?^//^ as local reporter. In 1891 he 
severed his connection with the Gazette to take 
the position of city reporter for the Quincy 
Daily Ledger ; and this position he still holds. 
In the fall of 1892 he was engaged to repre- 
sent the New England Associated Press in 
Quincy and Milton ; and he was thus occupied 
something over four years — until April, 1897, 
when the association retired from business. 
Immediately offered the post of correspondent 
in Quincy and Milton for the Boston Tran- 
script, Mr. Magee entered on his duties May i, 
1897. He is affiliated with several well- 
known secret organizations, being a member of 
the Essenic Order and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen, etc. 

On June 15, 1887, he married Fannie, 
daughter of Charles Granderson and Mary 
Frances (Merrill) Jackman. Mrs. Magee was 
born in Boston, January 14, 1864. One of 
her ancestors, Eli Conant, was a Lieutenant 
in the Revolutionary army. Mr. and Mrs. 
Magee have no children. 

James Pennim.an, ancestor of the Penniman 
family in America, was born in P^ngland. He 
was admitted a freeman in the Massachusetts 
Colony, March 6, 163 1. He married Lydia 
Eliot, a sister of the "Apostle to the Indians, " 
the Rev. John Eliot, with whom he came to 
America on the ship "Lion" in 1631; and 
the earliest known of him was in Braintree, 
Mass. His descendants in direct line were: 
Joseph,- James, ^ James, ■* Major Stephen,' 
Stephen,*^ and Stephen.' 

Stephen Pennimans was born in Braintree, 
June 4, 1743, a son of James and Dorcas 
(Vinton) Penniman. The Braintree town re- 
ports and the Massachusetts archives at the 
State-house are the sources from which his 
military history has been complied. It is in 
part as follows : — 

He was Lieutenant in Colonel Benjamin 
Lincoln's regiment of minute-men in April, 
1775, and was Captain from April 28 to May 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



•95 



25 that same year. On August 8, 1776, 
he marched as Captain to join Colonel 
Ebenezer Francis's regiment; and he was or- 
dered to be commissioned September 26, 1776. 
He was at one time Captain in Colonel Dike's 
regiment, stationed at Dorchester Heights; 
and, to quote directly from the archives, 
" Stephen Penniman appears with the rank of 
Major on the muster and pay roll of the field 
and staff officers of the Massachusetts 

regiment. Colonel Benjamin Gill for services 
in re-enforcing General Gates at Northward 
in 1777. Engaged September 15, 1777; dis- 
charged November 29, 1777-" In 1779 he 
was promoted to the rank of Colonel (Pat- 
tee's History of Old Braintree). He married 
Sarah Holbrook, January 25, 1765. They both 
died in Washington, N.H. 

Their son, Stephen Penniman," was born in 
Braintree, January 15, 1768, and died in that 
town, January 5, 1849. He was married in 
1792 to Relief Thayer, of Braintree, who was 
born July ig, 1774, and died August 26, 1861. 

Stephen Penniman,'" son of Stephen and 
Relief, was born in Braintree, August 25, 
1800, and died in Quincy, March 25, 1864. 
He married Caroline Veazie, who was born in 
Quincy, April 26,1805, and died in the same 
town. May 5, 1842. The following is a brief 
record of their children: George was born in 

1826, and died in 1850; Eliza, born about 

1827, died about 1855 ; Caroline, born Febru- 
ary 22, 1830, was married to Thomas Magee 
in Quincy, August 5, 1851 (the parents of 
George T. Magee) ; Stephen, born November 
12, 183 1, married Melinda D. Bridgham, Oc- 
tober 28, 1858; Henry, born in 1837, married 
Mary Batchelder; William Wood, born Sep- 
tember I, 1836, married Eliza A. Giles, 
November 25, 1858; Martha Ann, born Sep- 
tember I, 1836, is the wife of John W. 
Moore. 




IDWIN C. JENNEY, the Postmaster at 
Hyde Park and an attorney-at-law, is a 
most popular public official, having 
won by his courtesy, accommodating spirit, and 
attention to his responsible duties, a host of 
friends and well-wishers. Born December 14, 
1865, in Lakeville, Plymouth County, son of 



Charles I^. Jenney, he is a descendant of John 
Jenney, who came to the Plymouth Colony in 
1 62 1, or, as is perhaps more correctly stated, 
in 1623, in the ship " Little James," accom- 
panied by his wife Sarah (whom he married in 
Leyden in 1614) and three children — Samuel, 
Abigail, and Sarah. On May 22, 1627, there 
was a division of the cattle into twelve lots, 
which were assigned in just proportion to the 
colonists, who were divided into a correspond- 
ing number of companies. The twelfth lot 
fell to John Jenney and his company. Some 
of the descendants of John Jenney are living 
in I'lymouth at the present day. 

Edwin Jenney, the grandfather of Edwin 
C, was burn in New Bedford, where he was 
engaged during the larger part of his active 
years as a cooper. He subsequently removed 
to Lakeville, where he died at the age of 
eighty years. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Sarah Howland, bore him four children, 
all of whom are still living. 

Charles £. Jenney was born in New Bed- 
ford, where he was educated, and afterward 
learned the trade of a shoemaker. In his 
young manhood he was engaged for a time as 
a manufacturer of shoes in Middleboro, Mass. 
Thence he removed to Brockton, accepting the 
position of Chief of Police, which he held 
many years. In 1882 he came to Hyde Park 
to act in a similar capacity in this town, con- 
tinuing at the head of the police force here 
for about ten years. In 1889 he was appointed 
Deputy Sheriff of Norfolk County, an office in 
which he has since served to the satisfaction 
of all concerned. He married Alvira F. 
Clark, who was born in Middleboro, one of the 
four children of Zebulon Clark, a farmer of 
that place. She reared four children, namely: 
Charles F., an attorney, with offices in Hyde 
Park and Boston; Edwin C. ; Mabel C. ; and 
Lizzie K. Both parents are members of the 
Baptist church. In politics the father is a 
straightforward Republican. 

Edwin C. Jenney obtained his elementary 
education in the public schools of Middleboro 
and Brockton. After graduating from the 
Hyde Park High School, he went to work in 
the post-office as a clerk, under Henry C. 
Stark, remaining with him three years. He 
subsequently took up the study of law, gradu- 



ig6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ated from Boston University School of Law in 
1890, and was duly admitted to the bar. Soon 
after beginning practice in Hyde Tark, he 
opened an office in Boston also, and con- 
ducted both until appointed Postmaster in 
October, 1894. Since then Mr. Jenney has 
given undivided attention to his official duties. 
Under his management the Hyde Park post- 
office, which is one of the second class, has 
greatly facilitated the business interests of the 
place. His present force of assistants numbers 
ten carriers, five substitutes, four clerks, and 
one special delivery messenger, as against six 
carriers, two substitutes, and three clerks when 
he took the office. Within the past two years 
stations have been established at Claren- 
don Hills, Readville, and East River Street, 
and stamp agencies at 140 Fairmount Avenue 
and in the Hazelwood district. The territory 
over which he has postal charge covers five 
square miles, with a population of about four- 
teen thousand people, which is rapidly increas- 
ing, the town being one of the most prosperous 
and important in the vicinity of Boston. 

Mr. Jenney was married June 24, 1891, to 
Miss Lora J. Pattee, who was born in New- 
ton, Mass., daughter of Alonzo H. and Mary 
B. (Brooks) Pattee. Mr. Jenney is a Demo- 
crat in politics, being one of the strongest and 
most active members of his party in this local- 
ity. In 1891 and 1892 he was a candidate for 
the State legislature on the Democratic ticket. 




"ENRY BLACKMAN, an enterprising 
farmer of Needham, was born in 
Dorchester, Mass., September 8, 
1823, son of Henry and Caroline 
M. (Enslin) Blackman. The family came 
originally from England, and settled in Dor- 
chester, in which town Jonathan Blackman, 
grandfather of Henry, was born, lived, and 
died. Henry Blackman, father of the subject 
of this sketch, was born in Dorchester in 
1803. He was engaged for some time in the 
junk business there, and carried on the same 
business in Boston after becoming a resident 
of Needham. He was also engaged in farm- 
ing. He died January 26, 1863. His wife, 
Caroline, who was born February 8, 1804, 



and is now living in Needham, is a daughter 
of John Frederick luislin, formerly of Boston. 

Their son, Henry Blackman, was educated 
in the public schools of Dorchester, pursuing 
his studies until he was fifteen years of age, 
when he came to Needham with his father, 
and began working on the farm. He now 
owns a farm of twenty-eight acres on Green- 
dale Avenue, in the eastern part of Needham. 
He makes a specialty of milk and pork, and 
has also dealt quite extensively in wood. He 
served the town as Selectman for two years, 
has been Surveyor of Highways, was a fire en- 
gineer for ten years, and also served as fire 
warden. He attends the First Parish (Unita- 
rian) Church, and was a member of the Stand- 
ing Committee for a number of years. 

Mr. Blackman married in 1870 Jane C. , a 
daughter of David Young, of Loudon Centre, 
N.H., and has had two children: Carrie M., 
born in 1871, who married William Tilton, 
and died in December, 1895; and Henry D., 
born in 1874, who was educated in Comer's 
Commercial School, married Mabel A. Dodge, 
and now resides on the farm. 




"ARRY W. SOUTHER, Postmaster at 
Cohasset, his native place, was born 

1^ I on November 29, 1862, son of An- 
drew J. and Mehitable C. (Hart- 
well) Souther. The family is one of the old- 
est in this town. Probably the first of the 
name in Massachusetts was Nathaniel Souther, 
who was at Plymouth in 1636, and afterward 
removed to Boston. 

Andrew J. Souther, father of Harry W. , was 
in his earlier years in the employ of the South 
Shore Railroad as book-keeper, a vocation 
which he followed until a few years ago. He 
is still residing in Cohasset, his native town, 
and is now in his sixty-eighth .year. He was 
formerly active in public affairs, having served 
as Town Clerk and Treasurer, and is a highly 
respected citizen. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mehitable C. Piartwell, was born in 
Middleboro, Plymouth County, this State. 
Her father was a lineal descendant of William 
Hartwell, who settled in Concord, Mass., in 
1636; and her mother was a descendant of 




HENRY BLACKMAN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



'99 



John Alden, who came over in the " May- 
flower. 

Seven children were born to Andrew J. and 
Mehitable C. Souther, namely: Harry W., the 
special subject of this sketch; Eleanor G. ; 
Abbie H. ; Edward E. H. ; George \V. ; Kay 
M. ; and Blanche M. 

Harry W. Souther was educated in tiie com- 
mon and high schools of Cohasset. After 
comjdeting his studies he entered the employ 
of Charles A. Gross & Co. as a clerk, and 
gained the esteem and confidence of his em- 
ployers, with whom he remained several years, 
during which time he acquired a wide circle of 
friends and acquaintances. He has been a 
member of the Republican Town Committee 
for a number of years ; was formerly Town 
Auditor; was nominated Postmaster on July 2, 
1897, and confirmed three days later. 

Mr. Souther is a Past Master of Konohasset 
Lodge, F. & A. M. He is connected with 
Pentalpha Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and 
South Shore Commandery, Knights Templars; 
and is a member of Cohasset Lodge, No. 192, 
Independent Order of Odd I-'ellows. 



(3r^ 



HAVEN BEARING, M.D., a well- 
jl known and popular physician of Brain- 
-^' tree, was born in Kittery, York 
County, Me., son of Captain Roger and Lu- 
cinda (Boston) Bearing, both of Maine. His 
father was of English descent. He was for 
many years a sea captain, afterward carrying 
on commercial pursuits at Kittery and at 
Portsmouth. Members of the family in Eng- 
land have sat in Parliament and held high 
offices. The town of Beering, N.H., was 
named by Governor Wentworth, who married 
one of this family. 

Thomas Haven Bearing received his early 
education in the common schools of Kittery 
and in different New England academies, and 
continued it under special tutors in special 
college courses. His father met with finan- 
cial reverses; and, in order to provide himself 
with funds necessary to further study, the 
young man taught school for some years in 
Maine and New Hampshire. Ill health also 
interrupted his student life, and obliged him 
to take two sea voyages. He studied medi- 



cine at the best colleges of Philadelphia, New 
York, and Boston, and visited the principal 
hospitals of Europe. Eirst settling in Bos- 
ton, he was professor of surgery and derma- 
tology in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, for nearly six years was dean of 
the college, and was assistant surgeon of a 
Boston regiment. In the late war he was sur- 
geon in one of the largest hospitals of Wash- 
ington; and he is now an honorary member of 
Company K, P'ifth Regiment, Massachusetts 
Militia. 

Since May, 1863, Br. Bearing has been a 
resident physician of Braintree, and to-day 
controls a large local practice, with a firmly 
established reputation as physician and sur- 
geon. He is president of the South Norfolk 
Medical Society, a member of the American 
Medical Association, ex ojficio vice-president 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and a 
member of the Harvard Alumni Association. 
While a resident of Boston he was placed 
upon the School Board of that city, has since 
been for many years a member of the Braintree 
Board, and for five years its chairman. He 
has taken an active interest in the local 
politics of the town, and is at the preserit 
time a member of the Board of Water Com- 
missioners. He is, and has been for a num- 
ber of years, vice-president and a director of 
the Braintree Co-operative Bank. In 1889 he 
was elected to the House of Representatives. 
He has always been associated with the Re- 
publican party, and is a member of the Nor- 
folk Republican Club, Boston. 

He married Mary J. Jenkins, daughter of 
the late Beacon Solon Jenkins, of Boston. 
Four children were born of this union, 
namely: Mary J., wife of C. E. Belcher, a 
real estate dealer of Braintree; H. P'lora (de- 
ceased); Frank H., with the firm of Barry, 
Thayer & Co., well-known cotton merchants 
of Boston; and Br. Henry L., who is a gen- 
eral practitioner of Braintree, also making 
a specialty of diseases of women and children. 
The younger son is also a member of the 
Braintree School Board. His present (sec- 
ond) wife, Helen A., is the daughter of J. W. 
Nevers, an engineer of Charlestown. 

Br. Bearing is a member of the First Con- 
greoational Church. He is well known in 



ioo 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



musical circles, is a member of the Union 
Musical Choral Society of Braintree and its 
president, and is also identified with the 
Stoughton Musical Society, the oldest musical 
society in the country and one of the largest, 
of which he has been president. He was for 
many years the chorister of the Congregational 
church. The Doctor is identified with the 
Masonic order, and with the Knights of 
Honor, and is a member of the Boston and the 
Braintree Pine-tree Clubs, being president of 
the latter organization; also at the present 
time vice-president of the Massachusetts So- 
ciety of that name. Needless to .say, both 
professionally and socially, he enjoys a very 
wide and extended acquaintance. He has al- 
ways been a strong advocate of temperance, 
and upon appropriate occasions has delivered 
lectures on this subject, thus gaining an added 
reputation in the vicinity. 




LBERT DAVENPORT, of Hyde Park, 

one of the largest retail milk dealers 
in this section of Norfolk County, 
was born November i, 1855, in the 
neighboring town of Canton, which was also 
the birthplace of his father, Charles Daven- 
port. His grandfather, John Davenport, who 
was born and brought up in Milton, Mass., re- 
moved to Canton, where, until his death at 
the age of eighty years, he was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits on the farm that now 
forms a part of the J. M. P^orbes estate. 

Charles Davenport, one of a family of 
seven children, with them was reared on the 
parental homestead. Like his father, he has 
followed the occupation of farmer; and now, a 
hale and hearty man of seventy-two years, he 
resides on his homestead. Green Lodge farm, 
one of the most attractive estates in Canton. 
His wife, in maidenhood Mary Davenport, a 
daughter of Jesse Davenport, has borne him 
five sons and two daughters, of whom the 
daughters are deceased. The sons are: 
Charles E. , who is engaged in the ice busi- 
ness at Readville; Albert, the subject of, this 
sketch; Jesse E. ; Roger S. ; and Warren J. 
Both the father and mother are exemplary 
Universalists. 

Albert Davenport obtained a practical edu- 



cation in the common schools of Canton. In 
his boyhood he became familiar with farm 
work. When a young man he entered into 
the ice business in company with his brother 
Charles, continuing ten years, when the part- 
nership was dissolved. In 1891 he estab- 
lished his present business, commencing on a 
modest scale. His route at first covered but 
a small territory, and tiiirty-one eight-quart 
cans were sufficient to supply milk to his cus- 
tomers. He is now one of the largest of the 
eleven dealers in Hyde Park, as far as trade is 
concerned, running two wagons in Hyde Park 
alone. In the business he disposes of the 
milk product of nine dairy farms, or eight 
hundred quarts per day. 

On June i, 1879, Mr. Davenport married 
Miss Annie £. Forknall, who was born and 
bred in Boston, where her father, William S. 
Forknall, now a resident of Needham, was 
then engaged as a woollen manufacturer. 
They have a family of six daughters; namely, 
Edna F., Hattie E., Myrtle F., Annie M., 
Norma A., and Alberta E. Mr. Davenport is 
a steadfast Republican in politics. He is a 
member and one of the trustees of I'orest 
Lodge, No. 148; and Monterey Encampment, 
No. 60, I. O. O. F. ; a member of the 
American Legion of Honor; of the Ridley 
Protective Association of Worcester; and of 
the Waverly Club of Hyde Park. Both he 
and his wife are in communion with the Evan- 
gelical Society of Readville. 



^JON. JAMES T. STEVENS, a well- 
known manufacturer of South Brain- 
tree, was born in this town, June 
20, 1835, son of Benjamin Stevens, 
an Englishman, and Elizabeth (Austin) 
Stevens, who was a native of Nova Scotia. 

At the age of twelve years, after attending 
school in Braintree for a time, and taking a 
short course at the Hollis Academy, he began 
to work for his living in a tack factory of 
South Braintree. He industriously followed 
this line of occupation afterward until he was 
able to go into business for himself. In 
1870, in company with George D. Willis, he 
established himself as a manufacturer of tacks 




JAMES T. STE\'KXS. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



203 



and nails at South Braintree, under the firm 
name of J. T. Stevens & Co., which was after- 
wards changed to that of Stevens & Willis. 
This enterprise has proved most successful. 
The factory, well situated on the Monatiquot 
River, is fitted up with the best of machinery. 
He is also interested in the Co-operative 
Bank of Braintree, of which he was one of the 
incorporators, and has since been the presi- 
dent; and he is a trustee of the Braintree 
Savings Bank. 

For several years before the breaking out of 
the Civil War, Mr. Stevens was connected 
with the State militia, and held the rank of 
First Lieutenant. He responded to President 
Lincoln's first call for troops, and, as First 
Lieutenant of his company, saw service for 
three months at different stations in Virginia. 
He was subsequently made Captain of Com- 
pany I, Forty-second Regiment, Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry, and served at the 
front in Virginia. As a young man Mr. 
Stevens developed strong musical tastes, and 
was long an active member of the Braintree 
Glee Club. During Gilmore's Peace Jubilee 
in Boston he served as the president of the 
Braintree Musical Society, an organization 
which aided materially in the success of the 
great Jubilee. A strong Republican, he has 
been before the public eye in various offices 
of trust for many years past. He has served 
as chief engineer of the fire dejiartment. In 
1876 he was Braintree's Representative to the 
General Court: and he has been for many 
years the chairman of the Board of Water 
Commissioners and of the Board of Trustees 
of the Sinking Fund. In 1888 he was elected 
State Senator, and served for two terms. 

Mr. Stevens married Myra F. Willis, a 
daughter of George W. Willis, late of Brain- 
tree, and by her has two children — - George 
W. and Idella F. His daughter is now the 
wife of Louis W. Thayer. Mr. Stevens is an 
esteemed Mason of Delta Lodge of Weymouth, 
having membership with the Pentalpha Chap- 
ter and the South Shore Commandery. 
Fleeted First Commander of General Sylvanus 
Thayer Post, No. 87, G. A. R., he held that 
office for three consecutive terms. Mr. 
Stevens is also one of the trustees of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 




ERMON B. MILLER, one of the 
leading farmers of Franklin, Mass., 
a son of Elkanah and Lsabella 
(Battles) Miller, was born in the 
house where he now lives, March 23, 1823. 
His father, Elkanah Miller, son of Jesse 
Miller, lived in l-"ranklin for a time after mar- 
riage; but in 1824 he moved to Augusta, Me., 
where he continued his labors as a tiller of 
the soil. His first wife, Lsabella Battles, of 
North Bridge water, now Brockton, Mass., bore 
him seven children, namely: Hermon, the 
subject of this sketch; Catharine, the widow 
of Eliphalet Cooper, now living in Augusta; 
and Harriet Richardson, William, Adeline, 
Thurston (who went to California), and 
Charlotte .Skillings, all of whom have passed 
from earth. Mrs. Isabella B, Miller died in 
1840; and Mr. Elkanah Miller married for his 
second wife Mrs. Deborah Gleason, now de- 
ceased. He died in Augusta in November, 
1880. 

Hermon B. Miller was taken by his parents 
to Augusta when he was but one year old; and 
he there grew to maturity, and received his 
education in the jjublic schools. Learning 
the blacksmith's trade at the age of eighteen, 
he subsequently worked at the anvil in Au- 
gusta and elsewhere in Maine for about two 
years. When he was in his twenty-first year 
he went to New Bedford, Mass., where he re- 
mained about three years. After that he 
worked at his trade for three years in West 
Medway, a year in Woonsocket, R.I., and for 
seven years in Blackstone. Obliged then on 
account of his poor health to change hi« occu- 
pation, he bought his present farm in P'rank- 
lin, Mass. Industrious and enterprising, he 
has made many improvements on the place, 
which contains about seventy-five acres of 
land. He now works at farming altogether. 

While living in Blackstone, Mr. Miller 
held the office of Constable; and since he has 
lived in P'ranklin he has served on the police 
force of the town. In politics Mr. Miller is 
an Independent, believing in putting the best 
man in office. 

Mr. Miller was married September 4, 1845. 
to Mary Wadsworth, a daughter of Seth and 
Olive (Metcalf) Wadsworth, of Franklin. 
Mrs. Miller died April 10, 1897. She was 



204 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



the mother of five children, as follows: Mary 
I., born Au<iust 25, 1848, now the widow of 
George F. VVadsworth, and living at the pa- 
ternal home; Olive W., born June i, 1858, 
and George H., born May 25, i860, both liv- 
ing at home; and twins, Arthur O. and Alice 
O., born March 2, 1863. Alice O. died May 
10, 1896; and Arthur is working in a straw 
shop in Jtoston. 



ALBERT SIMPSON, of East Milton, 
the treasurer of the Granite Railway 
Company, whose headquarters are at 
166 Devonshire Street, Boston, was 
born in Quincy, Mass., November 12, 1848. 
He is a son of John A. and Mahala L. (Wig- 
gin) Simpson. The Simpson family is of 
Scotch origin. John A. Simpson, who was 
born in Greenland, N.H., resided in Quincy 
for a number of years, and was there engaged 
in the transportation of granite. He served 
on the Building Committee under whose di- 
rection the present city hall in Quincy was 
erected. A Democrat before the Civil War, 
he became a Republican after it. He died in 
1S62. His wife, a native of New Market, 
N.H., is still living. Of their family five are 
living, namely: John A., in Newfields, N.H. ; 
Mary E., the wife of Jonas W. Jewett, of 
Hartland, Me. ; Emma L., the wife of Charles 
Leavitt, of Quincy, Mass. ; Addie L. , the 
wife of Thomas L. Pcarce, of East Milton, 
Mass. ; and Charles F. 

J. Albert Simpson was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Quincy, finishing with the high 
school. When he was fourteen years of age 
his parents moved to East Milton, where he 
has since resided. At the age of fifteen he 
obtained a position as clerk in a millinery 
store of Boston. There he remained three 
years, and then for some time he was clerk in 
a Quincy store. During the ensuing four 
years he worked at paper-hanging and paint- 
ing, and for several years after he was a clerk 
in East Milton. In 1882 he was employed as 
book-keeper by the Granite Railway Com- 
l)any. He served in this capacity until 1890, 
when he was elected the treasurer of the com- 
pany. An able businessman, he is well fitted 
for his important position. 



Married in 1882 to Ela M., daughter of 
William Balch, late of Bcston, Mass., Mr. 
Simpson has two .sons — George A. and Will- 
iam B. In politics he is a Republican. For 
nine successive years he was Selectman of 
Milton, and for five years he was chairman of 
the board. During the first six years of his 
service on the board he was Assessor, Sur- 
veyor of Highways, and Overseer of the Poor. 
For two years he was Sewer Commissioner of 
Milton. An esteemed Mason, he belongs to 
Macedonian Lodge, F. & A. M., of Milton; 
and he is an Odd Fellow of Dorchester Lodge, 
No. 158. He is a member of the Baptist 
church at East Milton, and was chairman of 
the Building Committee that had charge of 
the erection of the present church edifice. 



rOHN ADAMS TILTON, a leading 
business man of Needham, is a native 
of the Granite State. Born on the 
Tilton farm at Deerfield in the year 
1 86 1, he belongs to the fifth generation of the 
family that has occupied the Tilton home- 
stead. His first ancestor in this country, who 
settled in New Hampshire, was one of three 
brothers that came from Tilton, England. 
The others severally settled in Maine and 
Massachusetts. The grandfather of John A., 
Josiah B. Tilton, was a prominent farmer of 
Deerfield, engaged extensively in market gar- 
dening. He married Nancy Adams, who was 
a cousin of John Adams, the second President 
of the United States. Grandfather Tilton 
was prominently identified with all public 
movements in his native town, and was Dep- 
uty Sheriff and Justice of the Peace for many 
years. Albert Tilton, son of Josiah, born in 
1-835, has always been engaged in agricult- 
ure. He married Emma, daughter of George 
W. Manning, a retired business man of New- 
buryport, Mass., and with his wife is now liv- 
ing at Needham. 

John A. Tilton was educated in the town 
schools of Deerfield. After leaving school, 
he worked on his father's farm until he was 
sixteen years of age. Then he began learn- 
ing the blacksmith's trade with Edward I"". 
Manning, of Newburyport, Mass., remaining 
with him for three years. Afterward he car- 




GE0R(;E \V. MORTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



207 



ried on a general blacksmith business for some 
five years at Deerfield. In 1883 he came to 
Needham, where he has since resided. For 
about three years he worked at farming. In 
1891 he went into the grain business, which 
he has since followed. He deals extensively 
in grain, flour, hay, coal, and wood. By his 
fair dealing and prompt delivery he has built 
up a prosperous and growing business. 

In 1S82 Mr. Tilton was united in marriage 
with Lucy, daughter of Caleb C. Crawley, of 
East Boston, Mass. He has two children, 
namely: Marion E., born in 1888, now at- 
tending the Kimball Intermediate School; 
and Ruth A., born in 1896. In politics Mr. 
Tilton supports the Republican party. 



DWIN N. MAYBERRY, M.D., a 
leading physician and surgeon of South 
Weymouth, was born in Edgartown, 
Mass., February 1 8, 1858, son of Dr. Edwin 
and Leonora (Hall) Mayberry. His father 
was a practising physician of Edgartown for 
twenty-five years. He removed to East Wey- 
mouth late in life, and there followed his pro- 
fession for several years previous to his death, 
which occurred in 1895. Four of his chil- 
dren survive, namely: a daughter, the wife of 
H. N. Allin, an attorney of Waltham, Mass. ; 
Dr. Edwin N. ; George L. , a lawyer of Wal- 
tham and an ex-Mayor of that city; and Dr. 
Charles B., connected with the State Hospital 
at Danville, Pa. 

Edwin N. Mayberry fitted for college at 
Edgartown, and began the study of medicine 
under the instruction of his father. He took 
the regular course at the Medical School of 
the University of Vermont, graduating in the 
class of 1882, afterward taking post-graduate 
studies at the Harvard University Medical 
School. After a brief period of professional 
experience, partly at Saugus and partly at 
West Warren, Mass., in December, 1885, he 
came to South Weymouth, where he estab- 
lished himself in a large and lucrative prac- 
tice. He married Fannie E. Lowry, of Bur- 
lington, Vt. 

Dr. Mayberry is a member of the State 
Medical Society, and has served officially as 
censor and counsellor of that body. He has 



been for several years a Deacon of the Union 
Congregational church at South Weymouth. 
He was one of the organizers of the South 
Weymouth Co-operative Bank, and has from 
the first been a director of the bank. A mem- 
ber of the Wildey Lodge, I. O. O. F., he is 
now a Past Grand of that lodge. He is also 
associated with the Grand Lodge of the State. 
The Doctor is a medical examiner for the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of New 
York, for the North-western Life Insurance 
Company of Milwaukee, Wis., for the Penn 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of I'hiladel- 
phia, the National Life Insurance Company 
of Montpelier, the State Mutual Life In- 
surance Company of Worcester, the Massa- 
chusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
Springfield, Mass., and also for several other 
companies in Maine and Connecticut. 



/^TeORGE WOODBURY MORTON, a 
\ '•) I naval veteran of the Civil War and 
a prominent real estate dealer of 
Quincy, was born here, May 2, i84i, in the 
old Morton homestead on the corner of Cod- 
dington and Spear Streets. A son of the late 
William Sa.xton Morton, he is a lineal de- 
scendant of George and Sarah (Bradford) Mor- 
ton. This George Morton came to America 
in the ship "Ann," which arrived in Plym- 
outh Harbor from England in July, 1623, 
being the third vessel after the "Mayflower" 
to reach this part of the coast. He and a Mr. 
Hathaway were spoken of by William Pierce, 
the commander of the "Ann" as two of his 
principal passengers. With him were his 
wife, who was a sister of Governor Brad- 
ford, and his four children. One of the 
latter, Nathaniel Morton, subsequently served 
the colony as its Secretary, and was the author 
of the "New England Memorial," a brief his- 
torical volume. 

William Sa.xton Morton, a son of Joseph 
and Mary (Wheeler) Morton, born in Rox- 
bury, Mass., September 22, 1809, died in 
Ouincy, September 21, 1871. He was well 
educated, having studied at the Phillips Exe- 
ter Academy in New Hampshire and later at 
Harvard College, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1831. Among his classmates at Har- 



2 08 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



vard were the celebrated Wendell Phillips; 
the late ex-Mayor Shurtleff, of Boston; and 
others who attained eminence in business or 
professional life. After spending a short 
time abroad, he commenced the study of law 
in the office of Sidney Bartlett, and subse- 
quently entered upon the legal profession at 
Amherst, N.H., under the auspices of the 
Hon. Perley Dodge, then Clerk of Courts in 
that locality. In 1840 he settled in Quincy, 
where he continued his professional labors 
until his demise, becoming one of the leading 
members of the bar. He served many years 
as Justice of the Peace and Commissioner of 
Insolvency, and he was also Trial Justice for 
a time. He was one of the prime movers in 
the formation of many of the leading business 
and financial organizations of this locality, 
and through his wise efforts their future suc- 
cess was attained. He was a charter member 
of the Quincy Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, which was established in 1850, and, 
being soon after chosen its president, served 
in that capacity throughout the rest of his 
life, his activity in its behalf placing it 
among the foremost offices of the kind in New 
England. His name also headed the list of 
incorporators of the Mount Wollaston Na- 
tional Bank, established in 1853, and of which 
he wa.*; for several years a director. In 1850 
he was a Representative to the General Court, 
and during that year he was a delegate to the 
Constitutional Convention. He took a deep 
interest in the cause of education, being espe- 
cially interested in the advancement of the 
public-school system, and was for some years 
a member of the local .School Board and a 
trustee of Milton Academy. While at Har- 
vard, the memories of which period he fondly 
cherished, he cultivated a taste for poetical 
literature that afterward bore fruit in the form 
of contributions to the leading periodicals of 
the day. He was of a sunny, genial disposi- 
tion, hospitable and generous almost to a 
fault, with sympathies that were quickly 
aroused by any call of distress. In him the 
deserving poor found a friend prompt to alle- 
viate their wants, and few seeking his aid 
went away empty-handed. At the home fire- 
side, surrounded by his family, in whom was 
centred his greatest happiness, his endearing 



qualities of heart and mind shone brightest. 
When the tocsin of war souniled through the 
land, his patriotic blood was aroused to the 
highest enthusiasm; and he bravely surren- 
dered two of his sons to his country, sending 
them forth to assist in sustaining the nation's 
honor and flag. While his life was not un- 
marked by sorrow, it was brightened by a firm 
belief in a happy future, as exjiressed by him- 
self in the following stanzas: — 

Twilight shades are gathering round me. 

And the night is coming on : 
Peering from their homes of azure, 

("ileam the star fires one l)y one. 

As 1 sit in silence lonely, 

.Musing o'er the dying da\. 
With its shadows come the memories 

Of the dear ones passed away. 

On the farther shore, united. 

They have met, and will not part. 
Clinging to each other's bosoms, 

Hand to hand and heart to heart. 

Radiant in that land of glory. 

Waiting are our angel train. 
Death, for me thou hast no terrors : 

I shall meet my loved again. 

The union of William S. Morton with Mar)' 
Jane Woodbury Grimes was solemnized on 
October 3, 1839, ^^ ^^^ Stone Chapel, Boston. 
She was born in Francestown, N.H., Febru- 
ary 19, 1 82 1, daughter of Thomas Grimes. 
Her children were: Joseph William, born at 
Amherst, N.H., July 22, 1840, who died at 
Quincy, Mass., December 17, 1865; George 
Woodbury, the subject of this sketch; Mary, 
born June 17, 1844; Arthur Austerfield, born 
January 11, 1847, who died March 24, 1854; 
Martha Woodbury, born December 25, 1849, 
who died April 26, 1870; Arthur Austerfield 
(second), born July 22, 1855, died December 
17, 1890; and Sarah Josephine, born August 
12, 1858. Joseph William, the first-born, was 
fitted for college under the tuition of Profes- 
sor Jenks, of Middleboro, with whom he sub- 
sequently visited the principal cities of Europe. 
In the spring of 1859 he entered the Harvard 
Law School, in which he pursued his studies 
until after the breaking out of the late war. 
Abandoning then his personal ambitions, he 
enlisted as a private in the Fourth Massachu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



209 



setts Volunteer Cavalry, which was at once sent 
to Ship Island, in the Gulf of Mexico. For 
meritorious conduct he was promoted to the 
rank of Second Lieutenant; and at the battle 
of Baton Rouge, August 5, 1862, owing to the 
illness or absence of higher officers, he was 
commanding officer of the cavalry there en- 
gaged, and was soon after made First Lieuten- 
ant. On account of sickness the young Lieu- 
tenant returned home for a short furlough. 
Going back to New Orleans before he had re- 
covered his health, he was forced to come 
home a second time, whereupon he resigned 
his commission. Governor Andrew subse- 
quently asked him to raise a company of men. 
Having complied with the request, he was 
made Captain of Company D, Fourth Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry, and sent to Hilton Head 
with his men, arriving there April i, 1S64. 
He then went to Jacksonville, thence to 
Gainesville. In Gainesville he was taken 
prisoner on August 8, 1864; and with other 
captives he was carried to Macon, then to Au- 
gusta, whence he was marched to Anderson- 
ville. He was subsequently sent to Charles- 
ton, and thence to Columbia, S.C. While 
here he escaped from prison, and found pro- 
tection within the lines of Sherman's army. 
Subsequently he was assigned to duty on the 
staff of General Blair, of the Seventeenth 
Army Corps. With his health completely 
undermined by the hardships of army and 
prison life, he died a few months after he was 
mustered out of service. 

Mary Morton, the eldest daughter of Will- 
iam Saxton Morton, married Jesse P. Wood- 
bury, of Francestown, N.H., his birthplace. 
He was a paymaster in the United States 
Navy during the war. Their children were: 
Mary Morton, born December 16, 1868; Jesse 
D., born May 7, 1871; Martha Morton, born 
July 9, 1872; Edith, born February 5, 1874; 
and William Sa.xton Morton, born September 
25, 1876, who died June 17, 1880. Sarah 
Josephine, the youngest child of William Sax- 
ton Morton, was married October 2, 1885, to 
Frederick H. Smith, of Quincy. 

George Woodbury Morton enlisted in the 
United States Navy when nineteen years old, 
and on September 25, 1861, was appointed 
acting assistant paymaster. On October 10 



of that year he reported for duty on board the 
United States steamer "R. B. Forbes," at 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, where Commodore 
S. F. Dupont was fitting out a squadron. A 
few days later the Commodore, with his fleet, 
set sail for Port Royal, where he arrived after 
a very stormy passage in which several vessels 
were disabled and some lost. On November 
7 the squadron, headed by Commodore 
Dupont in the frigate "Wabash," made an 
attack on F'orts Beauregard and Walker, which 
they captured after five hours of fighting. 
The "Forbes," being disabled, was towed to 
New York navy-yard by the steamship "At- 
lantic" for repairs. On the 23d of P'ebruary, 
1862, her repairs being completed, she was 
sent to New Orleans to join Admiral F'arra- 
gut's squadron; but, encountering bad weather 
on the way, she was wrecked and burned three 
days after leaving New York. Mr. Morton 
was on board the "Roanoke," waiting orders 
during the memorable engagement between 
the "Merrrimac" and the "Monitor" on 
March 9, 1862. Three days later he reported 
for duty to Lieutenant Commander Henry K. 
Davenport, on board the "Hetzel," at New- 
bern, N.C. He remained on the "Hetzel" 
three years, and afterward served under Cap- 
tain John J. Almy, on the "Juniata," stationed 
first at Fort Fisher and then at Port Royal, 
S.C. In May, 1865, the "Juniata" sailed for 
Bermuda, thence to the Cape de Verde Islands, 
Pernambuco, Bahia, Rio Janeiro, Montevideo, 
Buenos Ayres, and to the coast of West Africa, 
stopping at Loanda, Benguela, and at Great and 
Little Fish Bay. On the homeward trip the 
"Juniata" put in at St. Helena, Montevideo, 
Buenos Ayres, and Rio Janeiro. In the last- 
mentioned place Mr. Morton was detached 
from the vessel, and ordered home, to which 
he returned by way of London, and received 
his honorable discharge June 9, 1867. Since 
that time he has been actively identified with 
the real estate interests of Quincy, conducting 
a successful business. 

On February 3, 1887, Mr. Morton married 
Mrs. Lydia Lincoln (Averill) Follett, a 
daughter of the late Thomas W. Averill. The 
maiden name of Mrs. Morton's mother was 
Lydia Lincoln Souther. A further ancestral 
history of Mrs. Morton's maternal relatives 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



may be found in connection with the sketch of 
Edward B. Souther, a brother of her mother. 
The Souther family has been noted for longev- 
ity. An aunt of Mrs. Morton's mother, 
named Lydia Souther, lived to the remarkable 
age of one hundred years and three months. 
Mr. Morton is a stanch Republican in poli- 
tics. In the years of 1890, 1891, and 1892 
he was a member of the City Council, and 
served on the Finance Committee of that 
body. He has served as commodore, secre- 
tary, and treasurer of the Ouincy Yacht Club, 
of which he was a charter member. An ac- 
complished sportsman, he is equally expert 
with the gun and rod. He spends his sum- 
mers at his residence, called the Red Lion, 
at Hough's Neck, where he and his many 
friends find ample amusement and pleasure. 



[DGAR H. BOWERS, an influential 
resident of Needham, was born in 
Framingham, Middlesex County, on 
the 23d day of May, 1837, son of Francis 
and Elmira (Rice) Bowers. His grand- 
father, Samuel Bowers, was a native of 
Groton, Mass. The father, who was also born 
in Groton, and lived to be seventy years of 
age, died in 1861. By occupation he was 
a general farmer. The mother was a daugh- 
ter of Ezra Rice, and a lineal descendant of 
Edmund Rice, who came to this country in 
1638, bringing eight sons. 

Edgar H. Bowers was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of his native town, graduating 
from the high school in 1852. Then he went 
to work at the shoe business in Framingham. 
In i860 he came to Needham, and was here 
engaged for six years in the grocery business. 
He subsequently, with Galen Orr, his father- 
in-law, under the name of Galen Orr & Co., 
went into the manufacture of blind trimmings, 
their factory being at Needham, and their 
customers including jobbers and retail dealers 
throughout New England and as far West as 
California. Mr. Bowers was elected Assessor 
of Needham in 1885 and 1887, and served 
seven years in all, being for two years the 
chairman of the board, and for the remainder 
of the time its clerk. I'rom 1892 to 1895 he 
served the town as Selectman. He was again 



elected to that office in March, 1897, and is 
now the chairman of the board. In Norfolk 
Lodge, v. & A. M., he is a Past Master and 
the present secretary. In politics he is a 
Democrat, with a tendency to independence. 
He is a member of the I""irst Congregational 
Church, and has been a chorister therein for a 
number of years. Taking a deep interest in 
the temperance question, he was for many 
years a member of the Sons of Temperance. 
Since 1868 he has been a Justice of the 
Peace. After serving in the capacity of Post- 
master from 1885 to 1889, under President 
Cleveland's first administration, he resigned in 
favor of his assistant. 

In 1861 Mr. Bowers married Mary E. Orr, 
eldest daughter of Galen and Mary A. (Smith) 
Orr, of Needham. Galen Orr, whose name is 
highly honored in this section, was one of the 
representative business men of Needham. He 
was a descendant of Hugh Orr, born in Loch- 
winnoch, Scotland, on June 2, 1715, who 
came to this country, and settled in East 
Bridgewater, dying there on December 6, 
1798. Hugh is said to have made the first 
cannon barrel from a solid casting; and this 
weapon, it is alleged, was afterward used in 
the Revolutionary War. He was a member of 
the Massachusetts .Senate, and was a manu- 
facturer of cotton machinery. Galen Orr's 
parents were Thomas Orr, of Bridgewater, and 
Rachel (Bullen) Orr, who belonged to Need- 
ham. Galen was born in Shirley, Mass. 
After receiving a meagre school training, he 
began in very early life to be self-supporting. 
He learned the trade of nail-cutting, and then 
became a blacksmith. In 1839 he estab- 
lished the business which still bears his 
name. In 1864 he represented the Four- 
teenth Norfolk District in the General Court 
of Massachusetts; was Selectman and Over- 
seer of the Poor of Needham for eight con- 
secutive years, dating from 1855; and was 
elected again in 1872, and became the chair- 
man of the board. In 1869 he was elected 
Special County Commissioner, and served for 
three years; and in 1871 he was elected 
County Commissioner, and served until 1880. 
He was president of the Needham Savings 
Bank and a most liberal supporter of the First 
Congregational Church Society. Though not 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



a church member, he was deeply interested in 
the welfare of the society, furnished the church 
organ, and was for many years the organist. 
His noble and upright character were recog- 
nized and appreciated, and his natural kindli- 
ness of heart won for him the lasting gratitude 
of many whom he had hel]3ed. In politics he 
was a Republican. Mr. Orr was married in 
1837 to Mary Ann, daughter of Luther Smith, 
and had a family of one son and three 
daughters. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bowers have had three chil- 
dren — -Howard Francis, Willie S., and Alls- 
ton Rice. Howard, who was born in 1861, 
died in 1894; Willie died in 1872, when four 
years old; Allston, born in November, 1874, 
after passing through the grammar and high 
schools of Needham, took a course in the Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, and is 
now book-keeper for the Union Cycle Com- 
pany of Needham. 




kARCUS P. HODGES, a success- 
ful agriculturist and dairyman of 
Foxboro, Mass., was born Oc- 
tober 13, 1S25, on the farm where 
he now resides; and his father, Benjamin 
Hodges, Jr., was born on the same place, al- 
though the farm was at that earlier time in- 
cluded within the limits of the town of 
Sharon. 

The family is of English extraction, the 
emigrant ancestor having been William 
Hodges, who settled in Taunton, Mass., as 
early as 1643, ^"d died there eleven years 
later. He was one of the original owners of 
the Taunton Iron Works. By his wife, Mary, 
a daughter of Henry Andrews, he had two 
sons: John, born in 1650; and Henry, born 
in 1652. From Henry Hodges, who was a 
Deacon in the church and Captain in the mi- 
litia, and who married Esther Gallop, Mr. 
Marcus P. Hodges is descended, the succes- 
sive ancestors being: Henry, Jr., of the third 
generation; his son Josiah ; Benjamin, Sr. ; 
and Benjamin, Jr. 

In his early manhood Benjamin Hodges, 
Sr., son of Josiah Hodges, was a lifelong 
farmer. By dint of patient and persevering 
labor he cleared a large tract in what is now 



Foxboro, and, having replaced the original 
log cabin by a substantial frame house, here 
sjicnt his declining years, dying at the age of 
threescore and ten. He was a minute-man of 
the Revolution, was called into service at dif- 
ferent times, and was on guard when Dorches- 
ter Heights was fortified. His first wife, 
I'^sther Allen, whom he married in 1772, was 
a daughter of Robert and Ruth (H'isher) 
Allen, of Walpole. She died in 1780, having 
been the mother of three children — Sewall, 
Daniel, and Esther. His second wife, mar- 
ried in 1783, was Miriam Pratt, daughter of 
Josiah and Abigail (Williams) Pratt. She 
was the mother of six children: Hannah, born 
1784; Rachel; Joseph; Benjamin, Jr. ; Anna, 
born in 1791; and James, born 1794, died in 
infancy. Benjamin Hodges, Sr. , died in 
1 8 14. His wife, Miriam, died December 31, 
1825. 

Benjamin Hodges, Jr., was brought up on 
the home farm, and here spent his long and 
busy life of ninety-three years. He worked at 
the cooper's trade in conjunction with general 
farming, and was also a charcoal burner for 
many years. To him and his wife, Hannah 
Talbot, six children were born, namely: Ben- 
jamin F., who died in 1895; Emeline; Lucy; 
Lewis, who died in infancy; Marcus Pratt; 
and Catherine F. Emeline, who lives with 
her brother, Marcus P., is the widow of the 
late S. L. Boyden, and the mother of four 
children: Hannah E. ; Charles L., a private 
in Company F", F"ourth Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, who was wounded in battle, 
and died in New Orleans; Benjamin F . ; and 
Amos. Lucy, the widow of Asahel Dean, has 
two children — Marcus E. and Anna. Cath- 
erine, who lives in Chelsea, Mass., is the 
wife of Nahum Dunbar, and has three chil- 
dren — Mary Louisa, Charles G., and Annie. 

Marcus P. Hodges was educated in the dis- 
trict schools, and on the homestead farm ob- 
tained a practical knowledge of the various 
branches of industry included in agriculture. 
On leaving school he began working for his 
brother Benjamin, remaining with him, how- 
ever, but a short time. He then returned to 
the old homestead, and at his father's death 
inherited a portion of the paternal acres. He 
owns forty acres of tillable land, and has in 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



addition a large and valuable wood lot. He 
carries on general farming, making somewhat 
a specialty of dairying, keeping about twenty 
cows the entire year. 

Mr. Hodges cast his first Presidential vote 
in 1848 for Zachary Taylor. He is an ear- 
nest advocate of the principles of the Republi- 
can party, but has never been an aspirant for 
political honors, although he has served as 
Highway Surveyor, and has been a member of 
the jury on several occasions. 



TT^HARLES WILLIAMS HODGES, 
I Ky real estate dealer of Foxboro, Mass., 
\%) has been closely identified with the 
business interests of this section of 
Norfolk County for forty years, and has ma- 
terially assisted in advancing the growth and 
prosperity of the town in which he has so long 
resided. He was born September 12, 1823, 
on the same farm in Norton, Bristol County, 
that was the birthplace of his father, Williams 
Hodges. 

Concerning his early ancestors in this coun- 
try we glean a few particulars from the ex- 
ceedingly interesting "Genealogical Records 
of the Hodges Family in New England," com- 
piled by Almon D. Hodges, Jr., published in 
1896. 

William Hodges was an early settler in 
Taunton, Mass., his name appearing on the 
records in 1643. He married Mary Andrews, 
daughter of Henry Andrews, and had two 
sons: John, born in 1650: and Henry, who 
was born in 1652, and died in 1717, having 
been a "leading man in all the affairs of the 
settlement." His son Joseph, who was the 
first of the family to settle in Norton, living 
at "Crooked Meadow," was a Major in the old 
French War. He took an active part in the 
siege of Louisburg in 1745, and died before 
he could reach home. The Major's eldest 
son. Captain Joseph, through whom the line 
was continued, was born in 1714, and was 
killed in battle with the Indians near Lake 
George, N.Y., in 1756. He left one son, 
Joseph Hodges, 3d, the grandfather of Charles 
W., and two daughters — Miriam and Naomi. 

Joseph Hodges, 3d, was by occupation a 
tiller of the soil. Inheriting the military 



and patriotic spirit of his father and grand- 
father, he served long and bravely in the Rev- 
olutionary War, first as private, then succes- 
sively as Sergeant, Lieutenant, and Captain. 
He lived to the age of fifty-seven. He mar- 
ried Lurana Williams, and had eight children, 
seven of whom grew to years of maturity; 
namely, Miriam, Lurana, Joseph, Sophia, 
Williams, Clarissa, and Nancy — a son, Sim- 



eon, having died in childhood. 



The old 



homestead on which they were brought up is 
still in the possession of the family. 

Williams Hodges succeeded to the vocation 
in which he was reared, being one of the most 
prosperous farmers and highly esteemed citi- 
zens of Norton. He was very modest and re- 
tiring, and, with the exception of serving for 
a time as Selectman and Assessor when he 
was a young man, steadily refused public 
oiifice. He married Avis P. Whitmarsh, of 
Dighton, Mass., and they reared seven chil- 
dren, namely: Charles Williams, the subject 
of this sketch; Mary Avis; Angelia P., who 
died at the age of twenty-two years ; Joseph 
F. ; Clarissa; Emma R.; and Alfred B. 
Mary A. is the widow of Augustus Lane, for- 
merly a prominent citizen of Norton, and has 
two children — Helen and Dwight F. ; Joseph 
F. Hodges, a resident of Hyde Park, married 
Caroline Andrews, and has one child, George 
W. ; Clarissa is the widow of the late Ben- 
jamin Parker, of Norton ; Emma, who has 
never married, lives in Norton; Alfred, resid- 
ing in Taunton, married Ellen Pratt, of Nor- 
ton, and has one child. Bertha. 

Charles W. Hodges, after acquiring his ed- 
ucation in the district schools of Norton and 
at the academy in Seekonk, now East Provi- 
dence, taught school four years in the towns 
of Norton, Taunton, and Attleboro. He was 
subsequently employed seven years in a store 
of general merchandise in Norton, whence he 
came to Foxboro in 1857. Here, in company 
with his brother, Joseph F. Hodges, he 
opened a furniture and grocery store, which 
■they conducted ten years, when the firm was 
changed, the business being carried on for 
nine years more under the name of Hodges & 
Messenger. The partnership was then dis- 
solved and the business divided, Mr. Hodges 
retaining the furniture department, to which. 




CHARLES W. HODGES. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



fifteen years later, he added the insurance 
business, becoming agent for several com- 
panies. In 18S9 he sold the furniture busi- 
ness to his eldest son. Since that time he 
has been largely interested in real estate, in 
which he has had many extensive transactions; 
and he has recently admitted into partnership 
one of his younger sons. 

Mr. Hodges cast his first Presidential vote 
in 1844 for James K. Polk. He is a strong 
Prohibitionist in politics, and is a leading 
member of the Good Templars and of the Sons 
of Temperance. He has been elected to all 
the important offices within the gift of his 
fellow-townsmen, having been Selectman, As- 
sessor, School Committee, Town Treasurer for 
many years. Justice of the Peace a quarter of 
a century, and in 1853 he represented Norton 
in the State legislature. He has been presi- 
dent of the Foxboro Savings Bank. He has 
been a member and the treasurer of the local 
grange since its organization. 

Mr. Hodges was married April 30, 1856, to 
Mary K. Nichols, daughter of Gilbert and Re- 
becca (Crane) Nichols, of Berkeley, Mass. 
They have four children; namely, Charles G., 
Mary Avis, Louis Williams, and John Brad- 
ford. Charles G. Hodges married Laura L. 
Shepard, and has two children — Maud A. and 
Ruth E. He is in the furniture business, 
having succeeded his father, and is now Town 
Auditor and a trustee of the Savings Bank. 
Louis VV. Hodges is Town Clerk of P'oxboro, 
and also a Justice of the Peace. He married 
Annie A. Wilbur, a daughter of Seth S. Wil- 
bur, of this town: and they have three children 
— Grace Avis, Gilbert Williams, and Gene- 
vra Wilbur. 



M 



ANIEL B. WHITE, of Randolph, a 
prosperous coal dealer of Randolph, 
Wy was born in this town, May 27, 
1844. His parents were Solomon 
L. and Elizabeth (Belcher) White, the father 
being a native of Vermont, and the mother of 
Randolph, Mass. 

Daniel B. White was educated in the com- 
mon schools and at the Stetson High School. 
When fifteen years old he entered a grocery 
store as clerk. After acquiring a thorough 



knowledge of the business, he engaged in it 
for himself, taking as a partner Mr. R. W. 
Turner. Mr. Turner subsequently retiring, 
Mr. C. H. Belcher was admitted as a partner, 
the firm assuming the style of D. B. White 
& Co. Mr. White later became interested in 
the retail coal business with Mr. Turner, and 
selling in 1887 his interest in the grocery 
store to Mr. Belcher, and buying the interest 
of his partner Turner in the coal business, he 
has since carried on the latter alone. He is 
actively interested in the business develop- 
ment and general improvement of the town, 
was one of the promoters of the Randolph 
Power Company, of wiiich he is treasurer, is 
a member of the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners, and a trustee of the Savings Bank. 
Politically, he is a Republican. 

Mr. White married Flora A. Belcher, 
daughter of Charles lielcher, late of Ran- 
dolph, and has two children: Jennie 1'"., wife 
of W. H. Leavitt, of Randolph; and Helen 
E., who resides with her parents. Mr. 
White is a charter member of the Knights of 
Honor, and has been officially connected with 
the order in this town since its organization. 



/^C^TTlMAX B. loud, of the firm R. 
\ '•) I Loud & Sons, box manufacturers of 
^-— •^ South Weymouth, and Assessor of 
the town, was born in Weymouth, July 12, 
1839. A son of Reuben and Theda (Burrell) 
Loud, he belongs to one of the oldest families 
in Weymouth. The grandfather, Eliphalet 
Loud, who was also born in Weymouth, is 
said to have been a soldier in the Revolution; 
and his son Reuben is said to have been a 
soldier in the War of 181 2. Reuben, born in 
1798, died at the age of ninety-three. In 
early life he was in the grain business and a 
member of the firm of Joseph Loud & Co. 
Subsequently he started a planing-mill and 
box factory, which was conducted under the 
style of Reuben Loud & Son. He became an 
extensive land-owner, and was a well-known 
man in Weymouth in his day. His living 
children are: Reuben, Richard, Mary, Francis 
P., Gilman B., and Maria J. 

Gilman B. Loud grew to manhood in Wey- 
mouth, obtaining his education in the public 



2 l6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



schools. When about fourteen years old he 
began working in his father's planing-mill 
and box factory. In July, 1861, he became a 
member of the firm of Reuben Loud & Sons, 
with which he has been since identified. He 
married Lydia M. Shaw, of Weymouth, daugh- 
ter of George W. Shaw. Nine children have 
been born of the marriage; namely, Emily T. , 
George G., Wilton A., Frank E., R. Cady, 
Chester S., Lina M., Merton S. , and Jessie S. 
Mr. Loud has taken an active part in poli- 
tics in Weymouth. He was a member of the 
Republican Town Committee for some twenty 
years. For a year he was a member of the 
Board of Selectmen and he has served five 
years as Assessor of Taxes. A member of the 
Old South Congregational Church at South 
Weymouth for a quarter of a century, he has 
been a chorister therein, the treasurer of the 
society, and one of its Deacons for the past 
fifteen years. His large circle of business 
acquaintances have the fullest confidence in 
his integrity. Promptness and fair dealing 
are the characteristics of his business rela- 
tions. 



(^>r LBERT J. DANIELS, one of the lead- 
LJA ing farmers of Foxboro, was born 
J<i\\ where he now resides, October 13, 
— ' 1846, son of Lewis G. and Sarah 
A. (Perrigo) Daniels. His great-grandfather, 
Francis Daniels, who was a native of Nor- 
mandy, France, emigrated to America, and 
settled in Foxboro in 1749. Francis Daniels 
located upon wild land, which he cleared for 
agricultural purposes, erecting thereon a frame 
house; and before his death he had improved 
sixty acres of tillage land. He married 
Keziah Rockwood. His daughters, Margaret 
and Mary, became the first and second wives 
respectively of Ezra Carpenter, one of the 
leading residents of Foxboro in his day, con- 
cerning whom further information may be 
found in the sketch of E. P. Carpenter, which 
appears elsewhere in the Review. Anna 
Daniels, another daughter of Francis, mar- 
ried for her first husband Neheniiah Carpen- 
ter, and for her second, Stephen Rhodes. 

James Daniels, grandfather of Albert J., 
was born on the homestead in 1761. He suc- 



ceeded to its ownership, and resided there 
until his death, which occurred in 1849. He 
married for his first wife Naamah Guild, and 
for his second, I'llizabeth Gay, and reared the , 
following children: Jemima, Chloe, James, 
and Tryphena by his first marriage; and l-'.liz- 
abeth, Lewis G., and Anna by his second. 

Lewis G. Daniels, Albert J. Daniels's 
father, was born and reared upon the home 
farm, which he inherited in turn; and during 
his life he added many acres to the property. 
He also improved the house, and displayed 
much energy in the management of the prop- 
erty. He died in the spring of 1896, aged 
eighty- six years. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Sarah A. Perrigo, became the 
mother of three children — Lewis S., John F., 
and Albert J. Lewis S. , who is a travelling 
man, and resides in Cleveland, Ohio, married 
Lillian E. Carroll, and has one son, Harry 
C. , born September 14, 1874. John F., who 
resides in Central City, Col., wedded Martha 
Boomer, and his children are: Albert J., 
born July 25, 1870; and .Susan M., born July 
I, 1876. 

Albert J. Daniels was educated in the com- 
mon and high schools of Foxboro. When a 
young man he learned the carpenter's trade, 
which he followed as a journeyman in this 
town, and also in St. Paul, Minn., until 1871, 
when he returned to the homestead, and has 
since been engaged in general farming. 

On November 29, 1883, Mr. Daniels was 
united in marriage with Eliza A. Morse, 
daughter of Newell Morse; and for an account 
of her family and ancestors the reader is re- 
ferred to a sketch of Charles N. Morse, which 
also may be found upon another page of this 
work. Mr. and Mrs. Daniels have four chil- 
dren, as follows: Francis Newell, Marion 
Winifred, Laura Antoinette, and Bertha 
Alice. 

Politically, Mr. Daniels is a Republican; 
and his first Presidential vote was cast for 
General Ulysses S. Grant in 1868. He has 
rendered able services to the town as an As- 
sessor for eight years and as a member of the 
Board of Selectmen for two years. He and 
Mrs. Daniels are members of Foxboro Grange, 
No. 193, Patrons of Husbandry, in which he 
was lecturer three years. Four generations of 




MARSHALL L. PLRRIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2 19 



the family have occupied the farm, and it is 
worthy of note that the house built by his 
great-grandfather has been remodelled or en- 
larged by each succeeding generation. 



ARSHALL LIVINGSTON PER-^ 
RIN was born in the village of 



J ajj^ ( Grantville, now Wellesley Hills, 
— 'July 31, 1855. John Perryn, 
who came to this country from London in 
1635, and with others founded the town of 
Rehoboth, was his paternal ancestor; while his 
mother's family descended from Gregory 
Stone, who came here from England in 1634. 
Noah Perrin, his father, one of Boston's 
wholesale merchants fifty years ago, was a 
prominent Methodist. His mother, Philenia 
Winship Stone Perrin, was daughter of Cap- 
tain P. R. L. Stone, in the line of the early 
Unitarian settlers of Cambridge, Mount Au- 
burn being formerly called "Stone's Woods." 
Marshall Livingston Perrin received his 
schooling in Grantville, and was one of the 
original members of the Needham High 
School, West Division, which was held alter- 
nately by years in Maugus and in Waban 
Halls. He went from there to Harvard Col- 
lege, entering when he was fourteen years of 
age, and graduating in the class of 1874, be- 
fore he was nineteen, the youngest in his 
class. Immediately afterward he was ap- 
pointed secretary of an expedition of the 
United States Fish Commission to the Pacific 
coast, and travelled extensively in the unset- 
tled portions of the West. During this time, 
while living among the McCloud River Ind- 
ians near Mount Shasta, he was bitten, pre- 
sumably by a tarantula, from the effects of 
which he barely recovered. On returning 
East, he pursued post-graduate studies in 
science at Harvard University, receiving the 
degree of Master of Arts in 1876. For a 
number of years he was afterward connected 
with Mr. Stone's private school for boys, now 
located on Chestnut Street. 

In 188 1, when Wellesley was incorporated, 
Mr. Perrin was chosen by the citizens of the 
new town one of the first broad of School 
Committee. About this time, after recover- 



ing from pneumonia, he made several trips 
upon the Western Ocean, frequently on sail- 
ing-vessels, doing his share of the work, and 
one summer cruising among the whalers of the 
North with supplies from Newfoundland. 

Leaving home in the autumn of 1883, Mr. 
Perrin spent five or six years in travel and 
study, becoming intimately acquainted with 
the various phases of life in the countries of 
modern Europe. During this time he was 
connected with the German universities in 
the capacity of student or instructor, being 
appointed by the Prussian government for 
three years to the position of Lektor of the 
English language at the University of Gottin- 
gen. At this university he passed his doc- 
tor's examination in 1889. He had already 
been elected to the head of the department 
of Teutonic languages in Boston University, 
which position he still holds, having been 
made full professor in 1892. 

Since 1893 Mr. Perrin has also filled the 
office of Superintendent of Schools in his na- 
tive town, where the condition and reputation 
of the schools attest his efficiency. 

Mr. Perrin's literary work has been varied, 
including educational articles, an algebra 
drill book, the translation of the ponderous 
volumes of Von Sybel's "Founding of the 
German Empire," and a commentary in Ger- 
man upon an ancient Middle English Chron- 
icle in manuscript, upon which Mr. Perrin 
spent a good deal of learned research in the 
libraries of the Old World. Mr. Perrin has 
also been active in Masonic circles, and is 
to-day Master of Meridian Lodge, situated at 
Natick. Withal, Mr. Perrin is one of the 
busiest men in town, though he never seems 
to be in too much of a hurry to stop for a 
genial chat. From the delicate and weakly 
child of which the old residents tell us, one 
could scarcely recognize the robust and 
healthy figure of to-day. 

Mr. Perrin married February 23, 1889, 
Mary Josephine Williams, daughter of George 
B. Williams, of Maple Grove Farm, Walpole, 
N.H., a lady of rare accomplishments and re- 
finement. Very soon after the birth of their 
boy, Harold Livingston, who still survives, 
la grippe first raged, and numbered the young 
wife among its victims. Mr. Perrin has not 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



since married. lie lives with hiis mother on 
the homestead. 



/®Tc 



EORGP: VV. porter, a leading mu- 
I jJjT sician of Avon, and lately Repre- 
^ — sentative to the legislature from the 
Seventh Norfolk District, was born in East 
Stoughton (now Avon), January 30, 1843, son 
of Ahira and Rachel D. (Swan) Porter. The 
Porter family is of English origin, and the 
subject of this sketch is of the fifth generation 
in this country. His grandfather was Colonel 
Cyrus Porter, a prominent citizen of Avon. 
Ahira Porter, the father, was born in this 
town, and worked in the boot and shoe shops 
here for a number of years. An accoipplished 
musician, he taught singing-school in East 
Stoughton and neighboring towns. His death 
occurred in 1863. His wife, a native of 
Stoughton, died in 1861. They were the par- 
ents of six children — Ahira S., Rachel D. , 
William, Samuel, James, and George VV. 

George W. Porter acquired his education in 
the public schools of Avon. When he was 
about eighteen years of age he went to work 
in a shoe shop; and for twenty years he was 
employed in boot and shoe manufactories in 
this town, most of the time as a cutter. A 
natural and trained musician, he has been 
manager and director of the well-known 
Porter's Orchestra for a quarter of a century. 
This orchestra was organized by his oldest 
brother, Ahira S. Porter (now deceased), and 
is one of the best musical organizations of the 
kind in this part of the State. For the past 
ten years Mr. Porter has devoted practically 
all his time to the interests of the orchestra, 
which has filled engagements in many differ- 
ent towns throughout Eastern Massachusetts. 
He is a member of the Stoughton Musical 
Society. 

In 1866 Mr. I'orter was married to Ellen 
E., daughter of William H. Tucker, of Avon. 
Mr. Porter is a prominent member of the Re- 
publican party. During the session of 1895- 
96 he repn.'sented this district in the State 
legislature; and he has been chairman of the 
Avon Republican Committee for a number of 
years, and has served as Selectman for the 
past three years. 




REDERICK E. ROBINSON, a pros- 
perous shoe merchant of Dedham, 
Mass., was born in this town, Decem- 
ber 27, 1854, son of Samuel and Deborah 
Cutting (Upton) Robinson. 

Elijah Robinson, the paternal grandfather 
of Frederick 1-2., was a son of Jabez Robinson, 
who was born in England, and came to Amer- 
ica about the time of the Revolutionary War. 
He, Jabez, served as a private in the War of 
18 12. Elijah Robinson was born in Litch- 
field, Me., which was likewise the birthplace 
of his son Samuel. The latter, who is now 
eighty-five years old, followed farming during 
his active career, and also did contract work, 
giving employment to a large number of men. 
His wife, Deborah, was a daughter of James 
and Deborah (Cutting) Upton. Her maternal 
grandfather. Earl Cutting, was an American 
patriot, who fought in the Revolutionary 
War. Samuel and Deborah Robinson became 
the parents of six children; namely, Esther 
and Melissa (who died young), Samuel 
Francis, Theodore Edgar, Melissa Deborah, 
and Frederick PI. 

Frederick E. Robinson spent the early years 
of his life in Dedham, and acquired his school 
education in the grammar and high schools. 
At the age of seventeen he entered the store 
of Andrew Wiggin as clerk, and here gained 
his first knowledge of the shoe business. 
Subsequently he became a salesman for W. H. 
Pierson on Temple Place, Boston, and still 
later office clerk in a Lynn establishment. In 
1887 he returned to Dedham, and went into 
the boot and shoe business for himself. He 
has been very successful, and now enjoys the 
largest trade in his line in this town. Mr. 
Robinson is unmarried. In politics he is a 
Republican. He attends the Congregational 
church. 




e;^^WITHIN BROTHERS, comprising 
John and Thomas Swithin, granite 
dealers of Ouincy, were born Octo- 
ber 2, 1854, sons of Thomas 
Swithin. The parents, both of whom were 
born in Scotland, came to this country in 
1852, settling in Ouincy. The father was 
successfully engaged in the granite business 




CHARLES L. ISAUGKK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



223 



here, which included quarrying, building, 
paving, and monumental work by contract and 
otherwise, up to the time of his death. He 
belonged to Suffolk Lodge, I. O. O. F., of 
Boston, and to the Scotch Charitable Society. 

John and Thomas Swithin were educated in 
the public schools of Ouincy and at Miss Sa- 
ville's private school. Both served an appren- 
ticeship at the stone-cutter's trade, and subse- 
quently worked at it for wages until 1887. 
Then they started their present thriving busi- 
ness, under the firm name of Swithin Brothers. 

They make a specialty of fine monumental 
and statuary work. While their business is 
exclusively of a retail character, it is large; 
and they keep a number of agents on the 
road. The brothers are stockholders of the 
Lyons Granite Company, while John is one 
of its directors. Both are directors of the 
Blue Hill Granite Company; and they are 
stockholders of the Ouincy Quarry Company, 
of which John was a promoter and is now a 
director. They are also in the real estate 
business, keeping an ofifice therefor in Durgin 
& Merrill's Block, and owning- property in 
various parts of the city. John Swithin is a 
member of the Executive Committee of the 
Granite Manufacturers' Association of Ouincy; 
the president of the Ouincy Shoe Company; 
and a trustee of the President's Hill, Presi- 
dent's Hill Annex, and the Cranch Hill Real 
Estate Trusts. 

Both John and Thomas Swithin are mem- 
bers of Mount VVollaston Lodge, No. 80, 
I. O. O. P., and of Manet Encampment. 
John was elected to the City Council from 
Ward One in 1896, and served on the Com- 
mittee of Streets, Ways, Bridges, and Lights, 
and on that of Public Buildings and Grounds. 
Both brothers attend the Episcopal church. 



^I^UTHER O. CROCKER, a prosperous 
lj[ manufacturer of Braintree, was born 
JL Jf ^ in Bridgewater, Mass., December, 
1857, son of Luther O. and Olive 
M. Crocker. He is of English descent, and 
his paternal grandfather was Luther H. 
Crocker. Luther O. Crocker, the father, was 
a native of West Dedham, and a machinist and 
mechanical engineer by trade, which in early 



life he followed in Louisville, Ky., and Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. Though of limited education, 
not having enjoyed the opportunities within 
the reach of the young men of this generation, 
yet he improved those he had, and became ex- 
pert in his calling and successful in business. 
He was the inventor of fancy and complicated 
dies used in the manufacture of ticket punches, 
and established the manufactory now carried 
on in East Braintree by his son. He was a 
Republican politically, and was interested in 
all public improvements within the limits of 
his town and county. He attended the Union 
Congregational Church of Weymouth and 
Braintree, and was a member of the Masonic 
order. He died in April, 1895, leaving two 
children — Oscar M. and Luther O. His 
widow survives, and resides with her younger 
son. 

Until fifteen years of age Luther O. 
Crocker, the special subject of this sketch, 
attended school in East Braintree. Upon 
finishing his studies, he entered his father's 
factory to learn the art of manufacturing rail- 
road punches. After his father's death he 
assumed entire management of the business, 
and he has since maintained the high reputa- 
tion of the firm for reliable work. Mr. 
Crocker married Jennie Pratt, by whom he has 
three children — Fred M., Edith O., and 
Olive. Following his father's example, he is 
a Republican in politics. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Knights of Pythias. 



T^HARLES LOUIS BADGER, the 
I v-^ senior member of the firm Badger 
^^Hs Brothers, granite dealers and ma- 

chinists at West Ouincy, is one of 
the oldest and best known quarrymen of this 
vicinity. He was born August 17, 1820, in 
Bow, N. H., son of Ezra Badger. The grand- 
father, Jacob Badger, resided in Concord, 
N.H., his native town, throughout the larger 
part of his long and busy life of fourscore 
years. The other part was spent in Old 
Town, Me., where he was in business. A 
blacksmith by trade, he was a very skilful 
and ingenious workman, and sometimes made 
traps, knives, and other useful articles for the 
Indians. 



224 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Ezra Badger, born June 9, 1798, was reared 
in Concord, which was also his native town. 
He learned the trade of a quarryman when 
young, and started in business on his own ac- 
count in the neighboring town of Hooksett. 
Here he quarried about one-half of the granite 
used in the construction of Ouincy Market in 
Boston. This brought him into prominence; 
and a visit from Thomas Hollis, of Milton, 
Mass., induced him to give up his busi- 
ness in Hooksett, and come to Ouincy as 
superintendent of his quarries. When the 
Bunker Hill Monument Association was 
formed, he was chosen by the committee to 
superintend the quarrying of the granite to be 
used in erecting the monument ; and with 
Solomon Willard, its architect, he selected 
the Ouincy quarry from which the first granite 
used in its construction was taken. Begin- 
ning in 1847, he carried on business in 
Ouincy until about 1855, when he sold out, 
and retired. During the Civil War he en- 
listed as a wagoner in the Thirty-third Regi- 
ment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and 
died while in the army. In politics he was a 
Jacksonian Democrat during his younger days. 
Afterward he became successively a Whig 
and a Republican. He married Sophia 
White, a daughter of James White, of Bow, 
N. H., and by her became the father of eight 
children, namely: Charles Louis and Maria 
L. ; Mary A., the wife of Alonzo G. Davis, 
of this city; Charlotte S. J.; Leon C, de- 
ceased, who served in the Rebellion as a pri- 
vate in the Twenty-second Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity; Frank C, of Kinsley, 
Kan. ; Hannah Porter, who died at the age of 
seven years; and Clara O., who lived but 
three years. Both parents attended the Con- 
gregational church. 

Charles Louis Badger was eight years old 
when he came with his parents to Ouincy. 
At the age of sixteen years, when he had ac- 
quired the usual common -school education, he 
became a clerk in the office of Solomon Wil- 
lard, an architect. During five of the seven 
years he spent in this employment, he devoted 
his evenings to study, and gave one winter at 
the Lfniversity of Norwich, Vt., perfecting 
himself in mathematics. After leavina: Mr. 



Willard, he joined the J. B. Whicher Granite 
Company. Withdrawing from it in 1847, he 
passed the next two years travelling through 
New England, engaged in railway work. On 
November 11, 1849, he sailed for California 
by Cape Horn, spending six months on the 
way. On arriving at San Francisco, he went 
directly to the gold mines on the Tolumne 
River. Not meeting here with the success 
that he had anticipated, he returned to Massa- 
chusetts in the spring of 1852 by way of the 
Isthmus. Very soon after, he started in the 
granite business in company with his father, 
his brother Leon C, and his brother-in-law, 
A. G. Davis, under the name of K. Badger & 
Sons. In a few months the brother Leon and 
Mr. Davis withdrew from the firm, but the two 
remaining partners continued in the business 
until 1855. Mr. Badger and his brother, 
Leon C. Badger, then established the present 
firm of the Badger Brothers. They first 
worked the quarry from which was taken the 
granite used in building the New York Ex- 
change in 1835. I'l 1868 they purchased 
their present quarry, one of the largest in this 
part of the country, and have since been num- 
bered among the most extensive and prosper- 
ous granite dealers. They employ an average 
of one hundred men, including several skilled 
machinists for a branch of their business that 
they have carried on since the firm was incor- 
porated. Leon C. Badger died in or about the 
year 1S88, leaving three children — George 
L., Frederick L., and Margaret M. In 1863 
Mr. Badger admitted to partnership these two 
nephews and two sons. 

On August 10, 1852, Mr. Badger was mar- 
ried to Mary C, daughter of William Love- 
land, of Norwich, Vt. She bore him four 
children, namely: William E., now at the 
head of the firm of Badger Brothers; Clara 
E. , who died at the age of twenty years; 
Charles F., who died in March, 1896; and 
Mary L., also deceased. Mr. Badger's first 
wife died in April, 1870; and he subsequently 
married Annie W. French, a daughter of 
Adam and Sally (Allen) French. The pres- 
ent Mrs. Badger is a direct descendant of John 
Alden and Priscilla Mullins. Her only child, 
Henry L., died in infancy. Soon after that 
event Mr. and Mrs. Badger adopted a little 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



225 



boy, Russell VV. Badger, to whom they are 
giving the same advantages and care as they 
would to one of their own blood. In politics 
Mr. Badger is a strong Republican; and he is 
a member of Rural Lodge, F. & A. M. He 
is also a member of the Bethany Congrega- 
tional Church. Mrs. Badger is a Deaconess 
of the same church and the president of the 
Bethany Ladies' Circle connected therewith. 




WALES BAKER, a member of 
the Board of Selectmen of Ran- 
dolph and formerly Postmaster, 
was born in this town, November 
son of Minot and Fanny (White) 
Baker. His father was a native of New 
Hampshire; and his mother, who was born in 
what is now Brookville, Mass., was a descend- 
ant of Peregrine White, the first white child 
born in New England after the landing of the 
"Mayflower" Pilgrims. Minot Baker fol- 
lowed the shoemaker's trade in Randolph, and 
was a well-known and respected citizen. His 
death occurred in 1862. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in 
the common and high schools of Rantlolph, 
and at the age of twenty years began to learn 
the tinsmith's trade, serving an apprentice- 
ship of four years. After working as a jour- 
neyman in Toledo, Ohio, for a year, he re- 
turned to Randolph, where he engaged in 
business for himself, first alone and later be- 
coming associated with G. F. Thayer. The 
firm of Baker & Thayer continued in business 
until 1873, when they sold out to Charles A. 
Wales, Mr. Baker remaining with the new 
proprietor until 1888. For a short time he 
was employed at his trade in North liaston, 
Mass. In June^ 1890, he was appointed Post- 
master at Randolph by President Harrison, 
and held office until May 15, 1895, since 
which time he has carried on the tinware busi- 
ness here. 

Mr. Baker married Emma A. Fritts, of 
Randolph, and has a family of seven children; 
namely, Alice W., M. Everett, Florence L. , 
Cora A., Arthur C, Norman F., and 
Ernest R. 

Politically, Mr. Baker is a Republican, and 
has served as a Selectman since March, 1897. 



He is a Dictator of the Knights of Honor, 
and permanent secretary of Rising Star 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; chaplain of Pilgrim 
Lodge, No. 14, New England Order of Protec- 
tion; a member of Maple Lodge, No. 313, 
Knights and Ladies of Honor, of Ouincy, 
Mass. ; and Orator of Randolph Lodge, No. 7, 
American Benefit Society. lie is an earnest 
advocate of tlie temiierance cause. As an ac- 
tive member of the Congregational church he 
takes a deep interest in religious work, serv- 
ing as assessor and collector of the parish, 
treasurer of the church, and superintendent of 
the Sabbath-school. 



yLLIS J. PITCHER, a leading grocer 
P and business man of .South Weymouth, 
'^"^ - "^ is a native of Belfast, Me., born 
April 30, 1840, son of Calvin and Joanna 
(Prescott) Pitcher. The father was a native 
of Stoddard, N.H., and served as a soldier in 
the War of 18 12. The subject of this sketch 
was brought up on his father's farm, and at- 
tended the district schools during the winters. 
When eighteen years of age he went to sea, 
and spent ten years in foreign trade, serving 
both before the mast and as officer. Soon 
after the close of the Civil War he returned 
home ; and after a brief visit to his native place 
he established himself in the grocery business 
at West Medford, Mass. After being thus 
engaged for some time, he made one more sea 
voyage, on his return taking up his residence 
in Everett, Mass., where also he engaged in 
the grocery business. In 1872 he came to 
South Weymouth, and opened a grocery store, 
in which he has been very successful. Mr. 
Pitcher married Mary G. Allen, of Hillsboro, 
N.H., by whom he has three children — 
George E., Florence M., and Eloise A. He 
is a member of Wildey Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
at South Weymouth, and has been its treas- 
urer since 1885; and is a member of the 
U. O. G. C, of which society he has been 
treasurer since its organization in 1880. He 
is a trustee of the South Weymouth Savings 
Bank, a director in the Weymouth Agricult- 
ural and Industrial Society, and a director in 
Odd Fellows Hall Association. He was an 
incorporator of the Co-operative Bank, and has 



226 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



been its treasurer since its incorporation. 
Politically, he is a Democrat, and has capably 
served the town of Weymouth as Auditor. 




■RTHUR WHITAKER, an enterpris- 
ing farmer and milk dealer of Need- 
ham, Ma.ss. , was born in South- 
bridge, Mass., in 1859, son of 
Thomas and Harriet A. (Mason) Whitaker. 
The father, Thomas Whitaker, who was born 
in England, came to this country in 1838. 
He went first to Southbridge, but removed to 
Needhani in 1866, where he took an active 
part in politics, and was also an ardent tem- 
perance worker. His death occurred in 1882. 
He married Harriet A., daughter of Abel 
Mason, of Southbridge, but formerly of Med- 
held. Mrs. Thomas Whitaker was a member 
of the old Massachusetts family of Masons. 
Her grandfather served with the rank of Cap- 
tain in the Revolutionary War, and was pres- 
ent at the surrender of Burgoyne. 

Arthur Whitaker came to Needhani with his 
parents when he was seven years of age, and 
received his elementary education in the pub- 
lic schools of this town. He was graduated 
at the Massachusetts Agricultural College at 
Amher.st in 1881, and then, returning to 
Needham, engaged in his present business. 
He has a farm of fifty acres, and keeps forty 
cows, supplying four hundred families with 
milk. He also makes a specialty of market 
gardening, and grows large quantities of sweet 
corn for the Boston market, being probably 
the largest raiser of sweet corn in Massachu- 
setts. Mr. Whitaker personally supervises 
every department of his growing business, 
which he conducts according to the most 
scientific methods. The degree of success 
which he has attained is a strong argument in 
favor of scientific agriculture. Mr. Whitaker 
was elected Selectman in 1886, when he was 
but twenty- seven years of age; and he served 
for seven years, during three of which he was 
chairman of the board. He had previously 
been elected Assessor. He is now serving as 
Justice of the Peace. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the Norfolk 
Lodge, F. & A. M. ; of ]':iiot Lodge, No. 58, 
I. O. O. F., of which he is a Past Grand; and 



of the Needham Lodge of A. O. U. W. He 
also takes a great interest in athletics, and is 
a member of the Needhani Bicycle Club, and 
vice-president of the Newton Bicycle Club. 

On October 30, 1897, he was married to 
Miss Christine Wenzel, daughter of Iwan P. 
Wenzel, a prominent instructor of music in 
Boston. 



T^HARLES A. GROSS, a prominent 
I sX merchant of Cohasset, and a veteran 
\^ of the Civil War, was born in Du.x- 
bury, Mass., June 25, 1832, son of 
Jonathan Y. and Cynthia (Willard) Gross. 
His parents were natives of Massachusetts, 
and his father was a carpenter by trade. He 
acquired his education in the common schools 
and an academy of his native town, where he 
resided until he was eighteen years old. He 
then settled in Cohasset, and was for some 
time messenger for Beals's Cohasset & Boston 
It.xpress. Enlisting as a private in Company 
A, Forty-fifth Regiment, Massachusetts Vol- 
unteers, he served one year in tlie Rebellion, 
participating in the battles of Goldsboro, 
Kingston, and others. After his return home 
he resumed his former occupation, but subse- 
quently established himself in mercantile 
business, in which he continued alone for sev- 
eral years. He finally became associated, 
under the firm name of Gross & Nichols, with 
Mr. James H. Nichols, his present partner. 
The firm do a large retail business in gen- 
eral merchandise, and their methods are such 
as to gain the confidence of their numerous 
patrons. Mr. Gross is also president of the 
Cohasset Water Company, and is interested 
generally in public improvements. He is a 
Republican politically, and served as Post- 
master of Cohasset for eighteen' years. He is 
a Past Master of Konohasset Lodge, ¥. & 
A. M., belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and has been Commander of 
Henry Bryant Post, No. 98, G. A. R., for a 
number of years. 

Mr. Gross's present wife was before mar- 
riage Mary T. L. Lothrop, daughter of John 
0. A. Lothrop, further reference to whom may 
be found in the sketch of Caleb Lothrop, 
which appears on another page of the Review. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



229 



Mr. Gross has three daughters — Mrs. Caleb 
Lothrop, Laura A. Gross, and Mrs. Harry VV. 
Parker, of Cohasset. 



/"AOLONEL ABNER B. PACKARD, 
I Nr-^ of Quincy, a manufacturer of electro- 
^^Hs typCi stereotype, and linotype 

metal, a refiner of dross, and a 
dealer in lead, spelter, antimony, and tin, is 
a pioneer in his line of industry, and the 
founder of an extensive and profitable busi- 
ness. He was horn in this town, November 
21, 1821, a son of William and Lucy (Turner) 
Packard. The father was one of the leading 
quarryraen of Ouincy. By his wife, who was 
a native of Ouincy, he became the father of 
seventeen children, of whom eleven grew to 
maturity. These were: Lucy Ann, who is 
the widow of the late Dr. George Newcomb, of 
this city; Rosamond, deceased; Margaret, 
now deceased, who married Thomas White, 
also deceased: Lydia, deceased, who was the 
wife of the late P'rancis Saville; William H., 
of whom there is no special record; Elisha, 
deceased; Emily, deceased, who was the wife 
of the late Charles Marsh; Louisa, now Mrs. 
Stowe; Colonel Abner B. , the subject of this 
sketch; Abigail, the wife of Andrew J. Dun- 
bar; and Sarah, the widow of the late Joseph 
P'ranklin Burrell. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the P]piscopal church, and the father 
was a Deacon of the society for many years. 

Abner B. Packard, having completed his ed- 
ucation in the Ouincy public schools, went to 
Boston, where he was employed as clerk in a 
store for two or three years. He was subse- 
quently engaged in mercantile pursuits with 
his brother for a few years, and then started in 
his present business, beginning in a small way 
as a dealer in metals. With a team he first went 
through the country districts purchasing lead 
until his money was exhausted. Then, return- 
ing with about a thousand pounds of the metal, 
he unloaded it in a corner, mentally wondering 
how he was ever to get his money back. One 
day subsequently, while passing through 
Washington Street, Boston, he saw something 
lying in a hallway that looked like lead; and, 
climbing several flights of narrow stairs, he 
found himself in the old Dickinson Type 



Foundry. Here he inquired if they wanted 
to buy any lead, and, receiving an affirmative 
answer, returned to Ouincy, rah the lead he 
had on hand in an old pan, and forwarded it 
to the foundry. This transaction proved so 
profitable that he continued in the busines.s, 
and soon had among his regular customers two 
other type foundries and two lead-pipe fac- 
tories. Afterward he engaged in the manu 
facture of type metal, and has since supplied 
the offices of the New York Woi /d, I'nss, and 
A'ctL's, and furnishes nearly all the stereotype 
material for the New P^ngland trade, handling 
over six hundred tons of type metal annually. 
Colonel Packard is also associated in business 
with his nephew IClisha and his two sons. 
This firm, which at first made ink for shoe- 
makers' use, is now engaged in the manufact- 
ure of flavoring extracts and patent medicines. 
In his younger days the Colonel manufactured 
boots for a few years, employing twenty men 
in his factory. He is a director of the Mount 
Wollastnn National Bank and of the Ouincy 
Electric Light and Power Company. 

When the military company known as the 
Ouincy Light Guards was organized, Mr. 
Packart] was made Captain of a company, and 
in the following year was promoted to the 
rank of Lieutenant Colonel. In April, 1861, 
scarce a month after burying three beautiful 
little daughters, and leaving his wife, son, and 
nephew sick in bed, he set out to do his part 
in suppressing the Rebellion, in command of 
the Fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. 
He went by steamer directly to Fortress Mon- 
roe, thence, four weeks later, to Newport 
News, and at the end of six weeks to. Hamp- 
ton, where the regiment remained until the 
expiration of its three months' term of enlist- 
ment, when it was mustered out of service, 
and in 1862 was called out again, and waited 
in Boston three days, where they were dis- 
charged. 

Colonel Packard was married in November, 
1849, to Elizabeth, daughter of Lewis New- 
combe, of Ouincy. They have had six chil- 
dren, of whom Frank C. and Walter M. are 
living. Mrs. Packard, who is a great lover 
of flowers,- has made an extensive study of 
floriculture, and has had erected under her per- 
sonal supervision three of the finest green- 



23° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



houses in the city, one of which is one hun- 
dred feet in length, and has about ten 
thousand feet of space under glass. She is 
very successful as a florist, raising many rare 
and choice plants, but neither advertises nor 
sells to the trade, simply accommodating the 
home people. 




Franklin G. morse, superintend- 
ent of the Hoi brook Water Works, is 
a native of Hubbardston, Mass., born 
October lo, 1835, son of Asa and Elizabeth 
(Golding) Morse. He is a descendant of 
Abner Morse, an Englishman, who, with a 
number of others bearing the same surname, 
came to America several generations ago. 
Asa Morse, the father, was born in Hubbards- 
ton. He lived for a number of years in 
Petersham, Worcester County, Mass., and was 
engaged in the latter part of his life in farm- 
ing. His wife also, the mother of Franklin 
G., was a native of the old Bay State. 

Franklin G. Morse was three years old 
when his parents moved to Petersham; and he 
grew up on the farm there, acquiring his edu- 
cation in the district school. When he at- 
tained his majority, he went to work for him- 
self; and for seven years he was engaged in 
sewing leather in a boot and shoe shop in 
Athol, Mass., running a machine by foot- 
power. He was then for about three years en- 
gaged in the same way in East Randolph 
(now Holbrook), Mass. Subsequently he was 
employed for nearly thirty years as stationary 
engineer for Thomas White & Co., the well- 
known shoe manufacturers. In 1894 he was 
elected superintendent of the Holbrook Water 
Works, the duties of which responsible posi- 
tion he has since capably performed. He has 
been a member of the Holbrook Board of 
Water Commissioners for nine years. In pol- 
itics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Morse was married August 16, 1859, 
to Elvira I. Stockwell, of Athol, Mass. ; and 
they had one son, Charles, who died at the 
age of one year and fifteen days. Mr. Morse 
is a member of Rising Star Lodge, No. j6, 
I. O. O. F., of Randolph, Mass. He and his 
wife are members of the Winthrop Congrega- 
tional Church. A self-made man and mainly 



self-educated, his success reflects credit upon 
him; and he has the respect of all who know 
him. 




WATSON ARNOLD, a prominent 
resident of Braintree and a member of 
the firm Skinner & Arnold, provi- 
sion dealers of Boston, was born here, March 
2S» 1837, son of John B. and Nancy B. 
(Thayer) Arnold. He is descended from the 
English Arnolds. His father was a well- 
known boot and shoe manufacturer of Brain- 
tree, and was prominent in local politics. 

At the age of fifteen, after receiving a com- 
mon-school education, Mr. Arnold entered a 
Boston wooden-ware establishment in the 
capacity of clerk. Several years afterward 
spent by him in various lines of business in- 
cluded some time in a pharmacy, four years in 
the wholesale provision business, and ten 
years in the general merchandise business in 
Braintree. He then learned the wholesale 
grocery business in the establishment of 
Henry Callender & Co., of Boston, with whom 
he was associated for ten years. In July, 
1878, the present firm of Skinner & Arnold 
came into existence. This firm, which is 
most prosperous, deals in general provisions 
and hotel and restaurant supplies. 

Mr. Arnold married Miss Maria V. Board- 
man, of Saugus, Mass., and has four daugh- 
ters living — Bertha M., Helen L., Julia I., 
and Jessie R. He is Republican in politics, 
and he represented Braintree in the House in 
1868. He also served for several years as 
Town Clerk and the Postmaster of Braintree, 
and he is a trustee of the Thayer Public Li- 
brary. A supporter of every good cause, he 
is a liberal contributor to religious denomina- 
tions. He is a member of the Masonic order, 
and belongs to the South Shore Commandery 
at East Weymouth. In 1861 he took his blue 
lodge degrees. 



-ONATHAN COBB, of Dedham, Regis- 
ter of Probate and Insolvency for Nor- 
folk County, was born in this town 
March 2, 1829, son of Jonathan 
Holmes and Sophia (Doggett) Cobb. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2.31 



paternal grandfather, Jonathan Cobb, was a 
lifelong resident of Sharon, Mass. lie was 
an inn keeper in the days when the only means 
of travel was by stage, and he also carried on 
a farm. 

Jonathan Holmes Cobb, father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in Sharon, July 
g, 1799. He prepared for his collegiate 
course at the Milton Academy, and was gradu- 
ated at Harvard in 18 17. Entering the law 
office of William Dunbar, Esq., of Canton, he 
there engaged in the study of law until Octo- 
ber 9, 1818, when he sailed for Charleston, 
S.C., and resumed his studies in the ofifice of 
Benjamin F. Dunkin, then a prominent law- 
yer in that city. While in Charleston he 
opened a classical and English school; but 
upon the appearance of yellow fever in 1819 
lie returned to Massachusetts, and went into 
the law office of Jabez Chickering, Esq., in 
Dedhain. He was admitted to the Norfolk 
County bar in September, 1820, and opened 
an office in this town. Later he also had a 
law office in Boston, and for a year or two he 
was editor of the Village Register. About 
the year 1831 he engaged in the manufacture 
of silk, and published a work upon the sub- 
ject. In February, 1831, the legislature hav- 
ing authorized the publication of a manual 
upon the mulberry-tree and the manufacture of 
silk, Jonathan H. Cobb was commissioned by 
Governor Lincoln to prepare such a work. 
Several editions of the manual were printed; 
and afterward, by special act of Congress, it 
was issued by the national government, and 
distributed throughout the country. In 1837 
Mr. Cobb, its author, established a sewing- 
silk manufactory, of which he was the prin- 
cipal owner and superintendent. He con- 
ducted this enterprise until 1845, when the 
plant was destroyed by fire. 

Upon the retirement of Judge Haven in 
1833, Jonathan H. Cobb was appointed Regis- 
ter of Probate for Norfolk County, a position 
which he held until 1879, when he was suc- 
ceeded by his son. For thirty consecutive 
years he served as Town Clerk of Dedham, de- 
clining a re-election in 1875, and for forty 
years he was an active magistrate in this 
county. For many years he was an important 
factor in financial circles, and in 1831 was in- 



strumental in founding the Dedham Institu- 
tion for Savings. He was a Deacon of the 
First Church for more than forty years. Jon- 
athan Holmes Cobb died March 12, 1882. 
His wife, .Sophia, was a daughter of John 
Doggett, a Boston merchant, who resided in 
Dedham. .She became the mother of eight 
children, of whom the following survive: 
Sojihia J. I'"rcnch ; Jonathan, the subject of 
this sketch; Samuel D. ; Isabella F. French; 
Abl)ie Guild; and John D., a graduate of Har- 
vard and Assistant Register of Probate. 
Mrs. Sophia D. Cobb lived to be seventy-two 
years old. 

Jonathan Cobb received his education in the 
public and private schools, and had several 
teachers of languages, and at the age of fifteen 
went into a wholesale importing house in Bos- 
ton. In January, 1849, he departed for Cali- 
fornia by way of Mexico, and upon his arrival 
there worked in the mines two seasons and on 
a cattle ranch for a year. In November, 
185 1, he returned to Dedham. He was em- 
ployed in the probate office for about a year, 
at the end of which time he returned to mer- 
cantile pursuits as a salesman in a wholesale 
store in Boston. From 1855 to 1859 he was 
in business in Nashville, Tenn. Returning 
home in that year, he resumed work in the 
Registry of Probate as clerk ; and in January, 
1862, he was appointed Assistant Register. 
In 1879 he succeeded his father as Register, 
and has since occupied that position. His 
ability has been fully demonstrated by the 
efficient manner in which the large amount of 
probate and insolvency cases are handled, and 
he also transacts considerable private busi- 
ness. 

On July 29, 1857, Mr. Cobb was united in 
marriage with Martha S. Wales, who was born 
in Boston, March 24, 1832, daughter of Sam- 
uel Wales, a merchant of that city. Mrs. 
Cobb died June 29, 1S77. She was the 
mother of five children, and is survived by 
four, namely: Edward S., a mechanical en- 
gineer in San Francisco; Benjamin W., a 
book-keeper; Charles A., a travelling sales- 
man in the wholesale paper trade; and Fred- 
erick Copeland, a book-keeper in Dedham. 

Mr. Cobb is connected with the California 
Pioneers Society of New England. He is a 



232 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



member of the Unitarian churcli, and was 
parish clerk for twenty years. In politics he 
is a Republican. 



.''RANCIS MICTCALF, a retired manu- 
facturer, residing in Reliingham, 
Mass., and a son of HoUis and Abi- 
gail (Allen) Metcalf, was born here, January 
28, 1823. One of his early ancestors, who 
was born in Dedham in 1704, in :73s took up 
a farm of five hundred acres in North Bel- 
lingham, which he afterward cleared and 
largely brought under cultivation. He spent 
the rest of his life there. His son Stephen, 
who inherited the property, built the house 
which is still standing. Stephen was the first 
judge to hold court in the Norfolk County 
court-house. He died in Bellingham; and 
his son Stephen, the grandfather of Francis, 
took charge of the farm. Grandfather Met- 
calf, who was both a lawyer and farmer, died 
in the old home. Hollis Metcalf, son of the 
last Stephen, engaged in farming on the old 
homestead. He built the house now occupied 
by F'rancis Metcalf, and lived there until his 
death, which occurred October i, 1876. The 
first of his two marriages was contracted with 
Abigail Allen, who died in i860. She had 
two children: Francis, the subject of this 
sketch; and Olive, who died in 1841. The 
second marriage united him with Louise 
Allen, of Holliston, Mass., who died in No- 
vember, 1896. 

Francis Metcalf was educated in the public 
schools of Bellingham. Then he went for one 
year to the institute in Worcester, Mass. 
After leaving college, he worked on the farm 
with his father until 185 i, when he started in 
the manufacture of packing cases, in which he 
employed four or five men, and which was his 
business until his retirement from active life. 
Although successful in this line of busi- 
ness, he has always devoted some time to 
farming; and he still owns about one hundred 
and twenty-five acres of the old Metcalf home- 
stead. He also owns land in other parts of 
the town, and he has built several houses. 
The packing case factory is now conducted by 
his son. 

In politics Mr. Metcalf was formerly a 



Whig. In later years he has voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket, although he is very independent, 
preferring to support the better man regard- 
less of party. A member of the I. O. O. F., 
he belongs to Rising Sun Lodge, No. 99, of 
West Medway. He has been married three- 
times. The first occasion was in 1845, when 
he was united to Almira Adams, of Medway. 
Her father was Captain Christopher Adams, a 
cabinet-maker of Medway. She had two chil- 
dren: Frank H., who died when a baby; and 
Olive, now living in Providence, R.I. The 
mother died April 11, 1849. The second 
marriage was contracted on May 7, 1851, with 
Maria, daughter of Caleb Adams, a farmer of 
Bellingham. Her children were: Hiram 
Frank, born June 22, 1852, who married 
Katie E. Hazelton, of West Medway, and is 
now living in Providence, R. I., where he has 
charge of a large paper bo.x shop; Alice 
Maria, born October 17, 1853, who died in 
Minnesota, December 29, 1877; Lydia A., 
born November 13, 1855, who married Addi- 
son E. Bullard, the superintendent of a fac- 
tory in Caryville, Mass.; Edward B., born in 
1857, who died in babyhood; Sarah A., who 
died July 10, 1859; and Edward E., born 
July I, 1861, who lives in Caryville, and 
is working in his father's shop. Mr. Met- 
calf's second wife died January 21, 1870, 
at the age of forty-two years. On Novem- 
ber 27, 1 87 1, the third marriage was made 
with Mary, daughter of Alexander T. and 
Maria (Sayles) Wilkinson, of Mendon, Mass. 
Her father, who was a merchant, is now living 
in Milford, Mass. The present Mrs. Metcalf 
has had one child, Jesse W. , born July 27, 
1873, who died February 23, 1875. Mrs. 
Metcalf is a member of the Episcopal Church 
of Woonsocket, R.I. 




HARLES H. SPEAR, of Ouincy, 
was born here, April 12, 1844, son of 
Charles Adams Spear. The emi- 
grant ancestor of the Spear family 
was John Spear, whose son Samuel married 
Elizabeth Daniels. The next in line of de- 
scent was their son, John Spear, who married 
Mary Arnold. Their son, Seth Spear, who 
was born January 19, 1741, and who died Au- 




FRANCIS METCALF. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



235 



gust 26, 1 8 18, was the great-grandfather of 
Charles H. The line was continued through 
Alpheus Spear, a son of Seth by his second 
wife, Abigail Marsh Spear. Alpheus was a 
lifelong resident of Ouincy, where he carried 
on a thriving business as a farmer and trader. 
He was one of the founders of the Universal ist 
church of Ouincy and very active in the work 
of that denomination. He married Ann 
Adams, a woman of superior intellect, who 
ably assisted him in his domestic, social, and 
religious relations. 

Charles Adams Spear was born in this town, 
January 10, 1820, and was here bred and edu- 
cated. On attaining his majority, he hired 
tlie old Adams farm, and there for many years 
of his married life resided in the house in 
which John Adams, the second President of 
tiie United States, was born in 1735. He car- 
ried on general farming quite extensively, 
making a specialty of raising hay and produc- 
ing milk. He kept on an average about sixty 
cows, and as early as 1834 he began carrying 
milk into Boston. In the summer of 1848 he 
introduced the use of a two-wheeled cart as a 
conveyance. He had a large and lucrative 
milk route, and continued in the business 
until his death, which occurred May 8, 1868. 
He married Caroline Adams, a daughter of 
Hbenezer Green, of Ouincy. Their children 
were: Charles H., the subject of this sketch; 
Carrie Adams, who died at the age of fifteen 
years; and Alice Dean, the wife of John W. 
Sanborn, of this town. His religious creed 
was broad and liberal; and he was a generous 
contributor toward the support of the Univer- 
salist church, of which he was a valued 
member. 

Charles H. Spear received his education in 
the Ouincy public schools. As soon as he 
was old enough, he began assisting his father 
in the dairy and farm work. When twenty- 
two years of age he succeeded his father in 
the milk business, which he carried on suc- 
cessfully until April 4, 1876. As boy and 
man he drove the milk wagon for twenty 
years, during which period he never lost a 
day. He did not again engage in any perma- 
nent business until 1882, when he embarked 
in the ice trade, beginning in a modest way, 
with but two wagons, disposing of only sev- 



eral hundred tons a year. He soon estab- 
lished an extensive business, each year put- 
ting on additional wagons and men, being thus 
engaged until the 1st of January, 1895, when 
he sold his route, which then demanded five 
thousand tons yearly, to Frank S. Patch. 
Since that time Mr. Spear has not been ac- 
tively engaged in any business. Pie has been 
a director of the Blue Hill Granite Company 
since its organization and the treasurer of 
President's Hill Real Estate Trusts. 

On November 14, 1866, Mr. Spear married 
Mary F., daughter of Samuel Mitchell. Mr. 
Mitchell, who was born February 11, 1813, in 
Otisfield, Me., died in Ouincy, at the home 
of Mr. Spear, on June 16, 1889. He learned 
the trade of a carpenter in his youthful days, 
and at the age of twenty years removed to 
Boston, tvhere he continued at his chosen oc- 
cupation until the death of his wife. There- 
after he resided with his daughter in Ouincy. 
His wife, Charlotte Bray, a daughter of Joshua 
and Thankful (Bray) Plumer, had three chil- 
dren, of whom Mary F. and Charlotte A. at- 
tained maturity. Charlotte is the wife of 
Frank A. Bates, of Ikaintree. Mrs. Spear's 
grandmother. Thankful Bray Plumer, who, 
born May 29, 1776, in Gloucester, Mass., died 
August 3, 1865, was married to Joshua 
Plumer on October 9, 1803. Her father, 
Samuel Bray, Jr., was married May 23, 1771, 
to Molly Herrick. His father, Samuel Bray, 
Sr., who was baptized October 30, 1720, and 
died February ig, 1803, was married to Abi- 
gail Glover, June 13, 1743. Moses Bray, 
the father of the last-named Samuel, was 
a son of Thomas Bray, Jr., whose father, 
Thomas Bray, Sr., a ship-builder by trade, 
in 1642 came from England to America, 
landing in Gloucester, where the Bray family 
have since held an honored position. Mr. 
Spear and his wife have two children — 
Horace Emery and Lottie Bray. Both par- 
ents attend the Unitarian church. 



KRANKLIN D. THAYER, a well- 
known resident of Braintree, was born 
in the adjoining town of Weymouth. 
September 27, 1838, son of David and Lydia 
(Loud) Thayer. His maternal grandfather, 



^36 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Benjamin Loud, who was a carpenter and an 
early settler of Weymouth, lived to be more 
than ninety years old. The father, a native 
of Braintrce, resided in Weymouth after his 
marriage, and died when Franklin D. was but 
a child. The other surviving children of 
David Thayer are: Augusta, now Mrs. 
Walker, of Weymouth; and Susan T., the 
wife of Herbert A. Vinton, also of Wey- 
mouth. 

Franklin D. Thayer was brought up in the 
family of a relative, Thomas Humphrey, of 
Weymouth, a tanner and currier by trade. 
He attended the public schools until old 
enough to go into business. Then he became 
a manufacturer of leather, and afterward car- 
ried on that industry in Weymouth for eigh- 
teen years, employing about forty men in his 
plant. He married Sarah J. Brooks, who bore 
him one daughter, Jennie F. Thayer. For 
fourteen years he was identified with the fire 
department of the town, and for a number of 
years he was chief engineer of the department. 
He has also served two terms on the Board of 
Assessors in Weymouth. Mr. Thayer is a 
member of the Crescent Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
of East Weymouth ; of Pentelpha Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons ; and the Scribe of Or- 
phans' Hope Lodge, F. & A. M. He is 
also connected with the South Shore Com- 
mandery, and is a thirty-second degree Mason. 
Mr. Thayer is prominent in business circles 
in Weymouth, is a director of the Union 
National Bank there, and also a director of 
the South Weymouth Co-operative Bank. In 
i8g4 he retired from business. 



J~\R. SAMUEL A. TUTTLE, the 
=i well-known veterinary surgeon of 
'^J Hyde Park, and the proprietor of 
"Tuttle's Elixir," having an office 
at 27 lieverly Street, Boston, was born in 
Effingham, N. H., September 11, 1837, son of 
Samuel and Nancy (Drake) Tuttle. His 
great-grandfather, George Tuttle, who came 
from England and settled in Lee on a farm, 
at a later date removed to Effingham, where he 
afterward resided on another farm, and worked 
at his trade of wheelwright. George was em- 
ployed in various mills in that section, built a 



number of water-wheels, was a very well- 
known and influential man, and died at the 
age of eighty-four. His son George, the 
grandfather of Dr. Tuttle, was a farmer, and 
spent the greater part of his life on the farm, 
to which his parents moved when he was a 
boy. Grandfather Tuttle, who was one of a 
family of fourteen children, had fourteen chil- 
dren of his own, and died at the age of forty- 
six. His wife, Sarah G. Tuttle, was born in 
that vicinity, and lived to be eighty-four years 
old. 

Samuel Tuttle, the second of the fourteen 
children of his parents, was brought up a 
farmer, and afterward devoted his attention to 
agricultural pursuits. He lived on the old 
homestead, and after the death of his father 
assisted in the support of the family, and 
later moved to East Andover, where he spent 
the last years of his life, dying at the age of 
seventy-eight years. His wife, Nancy, was a 
daughter of Deacon John Drake, and was born 
in Effingham. She had a family of fourteen 
children, of whom ten grew to maturity, and 
four are still living. The latter are: Abra- 
ham D., Charles F., Samuel A., and W. D. 
Tuttle. The mother died at the age of 
seventy-two years. She was married when 
only sixteen years old, and had spent fifty-six 
years of wedded life. The celebration of her 
golden wedding was a pleasant occasion to all 
who were present. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Free Will Baptist church. 

Samuel A. Tuttle spent the early years of 
his life on his father's farm, and was educated 
in the common schools of his native town and 
in the academies at Wolfboro and Andover. 
In 1859 he went to Illinois, where he had a 
farm and ran a ranch, shipping cattle and hogs 
to Chicago. At the end of ten years he sold 
out, and went to the State of Mississippi, 
where he managed a large cotton plantation 
for a year. Then, coming North, he stopped 
in Boston, where he opened a sale and livery 
stable on a large scale. A year later he 
bought out the large Everett Stables in Hyde 
Park, containing fifty horses, and carried on a 
large business here for two years. Returning 
to Boston then, and purchasing a livery and 
sale stable, he carried it on until 1884, when 
he entered upon his present profession. In 




ALUNZO !•. UENNETT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



239 



the same year he began to manufacture 
"Tuttle's Elixir," which has since been intro- 
duced into every State in the Union, and has 
given such remarkable satisfaction. He has 
now a high reputation for skilful and success- 
ful treatment, and is called to go to all parts 
of New England to attend the most difficult 
cases of disease in high-bred and valuable 
animals. 

Dr. Tuttle is a Democrat in politics, as 
have been several generations of his family; 
but, though well suited for public life, he has 
steadily refused to be a candidate for office. 
He is a member of the I. O. O. F. A Mason 
of high standing, he belongs to Norfolk Royal 
Arch Chapter, Hyde Park Council, and 
Cyprus Commandery. In the Hyde Park 
Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is a 
member, the Doctor has served on the Official 
Board for many years, and has been a teacher 
of the Sunday-school. At a recent meeting 
of the Co-operative Bank League he was 
placed on the Executive Committee for three 
years. He has been a resident of Hyde Park 
since 1872. 




LONZO F. BENNETT, a retired man- 
ufacturer of jewelry, residing in 
Wrentham, was born February 1 3, 
1 841, in this town, which was the 
birthplace of his father, Isaac F. Bennett. 
He is descended from a pioneer family of New 
Hampshire, the State in which his grand- 
father, Isaac Bennett, was born and bred. 
While living among the granite hills, he 
learned the cabinet-maker's trade, after which 
he removed to this county, settling in 
Wrentham, where he died full of years. To 
him and his wife, whose maiden name was 
Elizabeth Randall, thirteen children were 
born. 

Isaac F. Bennett, one of the younger chil- 
dren of Isaac Bennett, was born September 
II, 1810. In common with the companions 
of his youth he obtained his education in the 
schools of his district. Subsequently, after 
working at the blacksmith's trade for several 
years, he became a tool-maker in the jewelry 
business, being employed in that capacity in 
North Attleboro, Mass. Sixteen years ago he 



retired from active pursuits; and he has since 
resided at the beautiful home of his son, 
Alonzo F., on the South Road. His wife, 
Lydia, was born in Rhode Island, daughter of 
Daniel and Lydia (Haskell) Hayden. They 
have six children — Ellen F., Bradford A., 
Ahmzo F., Charles H., Daniel, and Alice. 
Bradford, who is unmarried, lives on the old 
homestead. Charles H. is a prominent mer- 
chant of Springfield, Mass., and has three 
times represented that city in the General 
Court. Daniel, who married Anna O. Whit- 
ing, died in 1882, leaving three children — 
Alice B. , Marion N., and Arthur H. Alice, 
the youngest child of Isaac F. Bennett, and 
who graduated from the Woman's College of 
Philadelphia and from the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Pennsylvania, was 
the first woman to receive the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy in this country. She is a mem- 
ber of both the Legal Medico Society of 
Pennsylvania and the Legal Medical Society 
of New York. For sixteen years she was su- 
perintendent of the State Asylum for the In- 
sane at Norristown, Pa. This responsible 
position she recently resigned to take charge 
of an invalid daughter of one of Chicago's 
millionaires, with whom she has travelled ex- 
tensively through the country. 

Alonzo ¥. Bennett was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Wrentham. While yet a lad he 
became familiar with agricultural labor, and 
also learned the jewelry trade, at which he 
worked until the late Civil War was in full 
progress. In 1862, inspired by purely pa- 
triotic motives, he enlisted in the Forty-fifth 
Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, as Sergeant 
of a company. Afterward, with his comrades, 
he was in several important engagements, in- 
cluding the battles of Kingston and Goldsboro 
in North Carolina. At the close of the Re- 
bellion he resumed his trade, locating in 
North Attleboro, where he continued in the 
manufacture of jewelry for seventeen years. 
He then disposed of his interest in that, and 
has since resided on his farm in Wrentham, 
free from the restraints of business. 

On October 10, 1888, Mr. Bennett was mar- 
ried to Miss Mary Allston Morse, a daughter 
of William Morse. They have two children 
— Helen F. and Alice A. With the excep- 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tion of the year 1864, when he cast his first 
Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln, Mr. 
Bennett has been an earnest supporter of the 
Democratic party. 




LIJAH ADAMS MORSE, of Canton, 
manufacturer, member of Congress for 
the Twelfth Massachusetts District, 
is a native of Indiana, born in South Bend, 
but of an early New England family. His 
father, the Rev. Abner Morse, A.M., was a 
native of Medway, Mass., descending from 
Samuel Morse, who settled in Dedham in 
1635; and his mother, Hannah Peck Morse, 
was born in New York State. His middle 
name, Adams, is a family name, coming from 
the marriage of an ancestor of Joseph Morse, 
of Sherborn, with Prudence Adams, of Brain- 
tree (now Quincy), a relative of the Presi- 
dents, John Adams and John Quincy Adams. 
Eleven years after his birth the family re- 
turned to Massachusetts; and his early educa- 
tion was acquired here, in the public schools 
of Sherborn and Holliston, and at the well- 
known old Boylston School in Boston, and 
finisbed at the Onondaga Academy in New 
York State. In his nineteenth year he en- 
listed in the Civil War in Company A, Fourth 
Massachusetts Infantry, as a private, and was 
with General Butler in Virginia three months 
and with General Banks for nine months in 
Louisiana. The foundation of his fortune was 
laid when he was yet a boy, alone in a little 
shop in Sharon, during his school vacations, 
in the preparation of the stove polish which 
afterward became so widely known under the 
name of the ''Rising Sun." Upon his return 
from the army he joined his brother in the 
establishment in Canton of the works for the 
manufacture of his stove polish; and this was 
rapidly developed into an important industry. 
The factory now covers four acres of land, and 
has a capacity of ten tons a day. Since Sep- 
tember I, 1888, Mr. Morse has been the sole 
proprietor of the business. 

Mr. Morse's public career began in the 
seventies, when he was elected a member of 
the Massachusetts House of Representatives 
for 1876, in which body he at once became 
prominent. In 1886 and 1887 he was a mem- 



ber of the State Senate, in 1888 a member of 
the Executive Council, and in the latter year, 
while holding the position of Councillor, was 
nominated and elected to Congress as the suc- 
cessor of the Hon. John D. Long, by a ma- 
jority of three thousand, six hundred and 
eighty votes. He has since served in the 
Fifty-first, Fifty-second, Fifty-third, and 
Fifty-fourth Congresses, and declined a cer- 
tain nomination and re-election to the Fifty- 
fifth Congress. As a State Senator he was 
influential in advancing various reform meas- 
ures, and, with other legislation, secured rad- 
ical amendments to the laws for the protection 
of children and for punishment of crimes 
against chastity. In Congress he has been 
identified with all the great measures advo- 
cated by the Republican party, and has made 
speeches on the floor of the House in favor of 
protection to American manufactures and 
American labor, in favor of sound finances, 
in favor of restricted immigration, against 
sectarian appropriations of public money, in 
favor of more stringent naturalization laws, in 
favor of the annexation of the Hawaiian 
Islands, in favor of memorializing the Russian 
government in behalf of the persecuted Jews, 
in favor of a non-partisan commission to in- 
vestigate the alcoholic liquor traffic and its re- 
lation to pauperism, crime, insanity, and tax- 
ation, and on many other important subjects. 
His politics have always been Republican. 
He has also been a lifelong supporter of tem- 
perance measures, for many years a recognized 
leader in the temperance cause. He is inter- 
ested in all matters pertaining to the public 
schools, and is a warm supporter of every 
effort for social reform which he regards as 
genuine. He is a practical philanthropist, 
and has given generously to various charities. 
The ground for th'e Canton Memorial Hall, the 
memorial tablets on the hall, and the bronze 
soldier on the green, in memory of those who 
fell in the Civil War, were his gifts to the 
town of Canton. He has frequently been 
heard on the public platform in addresses on 
political, educational, temperance. Grand 
Army, and religious topics, of which he has 
delivered more than two thousand in New 
England and other States. Mr. Morse is a 
member of the New England Historic-Genea- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



241 



logical Society, of the Congregational Club, 
of the Norfolk Club, of Post, No. 94, G. A. R., 
and of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
and has for many years been a Deacon of the 
Congregational church in Canton. 

He was married January i, 1868, to Miss 
Felicia Vining, daughter of Samuel A. Vin- 
ing, of Holbrook. They have three living 
children: Abner, born in 1870; Samuel, in 
1876; and Benjamin, in 1878. (Copied from 
"Men of Progress.") 




Fulton, 



lISS JULIA A. EASTMAN, of 
Wellesley, a well-known writer 
and one of the founders of the 
Dana Hall School, was born in 
N.Y., in 1837. A daughter of the 
Rev. John Eastman and his wife, Prudence, 
she is a descendant of Roger Eastman, who 
settled in Salisbury in 1638. Born in Eng- 
land in 161 I, he came to the country from 
London in the ship "Confidence," John Tob- 
son, master. Joseph, one of the ten children 
of Roger, born in 165 i, went from Salisbury to 
Hadley, and died there in April, i6gi. He 
married Mary, daughter of the Hon. Peter Til- 
son, of Hadley, and had a family of three chil- 
dren. Joseph (second), son of Joseph (first), 
was born in 1683. He was taken captive by 
the French and Indians at the time when the 
raid upon Deerfield was made. After his re- 
lease he settled in Hadley on the place of 
his grandfather. In 171 1 he married Mary 
Smith. Joseph (third), a native of Amherst, 
born in 1715, died in 1790. On May 17, 
1746, he married Sarah Ingraham ; and ten 
children were born to them. John, son of Jo- 
seph (third), was born at Amherst in 175 1. 
He married Hepzibah, daughter of John 
Keyes, and became the father of fifteen chil- 
dren. 

The Rev. John Eastman, born in Amherst 
in 1803, was educated at Williams College 
and in the Theological Seminary at Auburn, 
N.Y. In 1830 he was ordained to the minis- 
try, and commenced his pastoral duties in the 
Congregational church at Fulton, N.Y. For 
eleven years he was pastor of the Congrega- 
tional church in Danville, Vt. For seventeen 
years he labored at Hawley, Mass., in the East 



and West I'arishes, and he was in Indiana for 
two years. He continued in active work until 
he was seventy-five years old, when he retired; 
and in 1880 he died at Wellesley. Mrs. Pru- 
dence Eastman, a daughter of Barnet Dole, of 
Charlemont, Mass., was born in 18 12, and 
died in 1844. Her mother before marriage 
was Prudence Wilder, of Shelburne, Mass. 

Miss Eastman came to Hawley in 1843, and 
was sent to the public schools of that town. 
She was subsequently a pupil of Amherst 
Academy, of Monson Academy, and of Ipswich 
Female Seminary at Ipswich, Mass. She 
commenced teaching in Owego, N.Y., and was 
engaged in the academy there in 1859 and 
i860. Later she taught in Monson Academy 
and in a private school of Westficld, Mass., 
for five years. She then devoted her time for 
six or eight years to literary work, writing 
books for boys and girls, and winning thereby 
many prizes. One of her stories was "Strik- 
ing for the Right," which won a prize of one 
thousand dollars, offered by the publishers, D. 
Lothrop & Co. This and other writings of 
Miss Eastman published by the Lothrops have 
been translated into several foreign languages. 
She has also written more or less for the 
Youth's Coinpanion. In 188 1 she and her sister 
Sarah opened the Dana Hall School at Welles- 
ley, a preparatory school for young ladies, 
fitting especially for Wellesley College, and 
entering its pupils at the college upon the 
certificate of its principals. The Misses East- 
man are sole proprietors of the school, which 
now has about one hundred pupils. 

Miss Sarah Eastman, the younger of the two 
ladies, was born in Mexico, N.Y., in 1839, 
and was graduated from Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege in the class of 1861. Of this college 
she is at present one of the trustees. She 
taught for several years in Ohio, also in Welles- 
ley College, which she left to take charge of 
the preparatory school with her sister. 



REELAND DAVID LESLIE, M.D., 
a leading physician of Milton, was born 
June 29, 1858, in Patten, Me., son of 
.Sylvester Z. and Isabel L. (Huston) Leslie, 
both natives of Maine. The Leslies are an 
old Scottish family: and this branch in Amer- 



H2 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ica is traced back to the Rev. James Leslie, 
who came to New England with his wife, Mar- 
garet Sherar, about the year 1728, and settled 
at Topsfield, Essex County, Mass. 

From James Leslie, through his son George, 
his grandson William, and William's son, 
Samuel Chase Leslie, the line descends to 
Sylvester Zina, father of Dr. Leslie. 

The Rev. George Leslie, born November 
25, 1727, was graduated at Harvard College in 
I74<S, ordained to the ministry at Linebrook in 
Ipswich, Mass., November 15, 1749, had 
charge of the church there thirty years, was 
then dismissed at his own request, and was in- 
stalled July 12, 1780, as minister at Washing- 
ton, N.H., where "he discharged his duties 
with faithfulness and great acceptance until 
his death, which occurred September 11, 
1800." The headstone which marks his 
grave, placed there by vote of the town, con- 
tains this epitaph, showing the estimation in 
which he was held by the friends who knew 
bim best: "He was a man of brilliant genius 
and great learning and eminent in piety and 
morality." Further interesting particulars 
concerning him may be found in Felt's His- 
tory of Ipswich, Mass., and the History of 
Washington, N. H. 

He married Hepzibah Burpee, daughter of 
Deacon Jonathan Burpee, and had eight chil- 
dren—George, Jr., David, James, Jonathan, 
William, Hepzibah, Joseph, and Mehitable. 
David Leslie, the second son, was the father of 
the Rev. David Leslie, born in 1797, who in 
1837 was sent as a Methodist missionary to 
Oregon, where he assisted in forming one of 
the first Protestant churches on the Pacific 
coast, and aided in founding Willamette 
University. 

William, fifth son of the Rev. George 
Leslie, born in Ipswich, Mass., resided for 
some years in Cornish, N.H., the home of his 
wife, Mary Chase, who died at the early age 
of twenty-three years. Their children were: 
Betsy, Mary, and Samuel Chase, who is the 
fourth in the line now being considered. 

Samuel Chase Leslie, born September 17, 
1791, married Mary Eliza Thomas, of Clare- 
mont, N.H., and lived successively in Salem 
and Haverhill, Mass., in Lincoln and in Pat- 
ten, Me., where he died, April 20, 1845. His 



wife, born November 26, 1792, died December 
29, 1847. Their children were: William, 
born January 29, 1818; David T., born July 
ig, 1819, who was educated at West Point, 
served in the Mexican War, and was killed at 
Matamoras, January 20, 1847; Esther Ives; 
James B. ; Samuel C; John P.; Sylvester 
Zina, born July 12, 1831; and Mary E., born 
in 1835, died April 29, 1857. Sylvester 
Zina Leslie married October 7, 1855, Isabel 
Leighton Huston, born January 21, 1835. 
They had two children, namely: Freeland 
David, the special subject of this biographical 
sketch; and his sister, Ida May, born in 
Patten, Me., February 5, i860. 

When in his eleventh year I'reeland D. 
Leslie removed with his parents to Boston, 
Mass. He attended the public schools in that 
city, including the English High School, and 
subsequently pursued a course in medicine in 
the Boston University School of Medicine, 
where he was graduated in 1879. Beginning 
the practice of his profession in Canton, 
Mass., in June, 1880, he remained there for 
five years; and at the end of this time he went 
abroad, and took special lecture courses in the 
hospitals at Vienna and Berlin, spending two 
years in Europe. In 1888 Dr. Leslie came to 
Milton, where he has since been assiduously 
engaged in the practice of medicine, becoming 
so well and favorably known in this region 
that comment upon his skill seems needless. 
Having found time to be interested in many 
things not directly within the pale of his pro- 
fessional duties, he is now on his second term 
as a member of the School Committee, and he 
has also served on the local Board of Health. 
He is a member of the Massachusetts Homoeo- 
pathic Medical Society; of Macedonian 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Milton, of which he 
was first Master; and of Dorchester Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. 

Dr. Leslie married Georgiana Shepard, 
daughter of James S. Shepard, of Canton, 
Mass. They have three children: Bernard 
Shepard Leslie, born in London, England, 
December 2, 1882; Howard Clifford Leslie, 
born in Milton, Mass., Sunday, November 4, 
1 888; and Freeland Huston Leslie, born in 
Milton, November 7, 1890. The Doctor and 
his family reside on Brook Road. 




alfki;d (;, metcalf. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



245 




LFRED G. METCALF, a prominent 
and highly respected citizen of Frank- 
lin, now living in retirement, was 
born in this town, May 23, 1825, 
son of William and Sallie (Gaskell) Metcalf. 
William H. Metcalf, the grandfather, was 
born December 23, 1754. He was a farmer 
and a soldier of the Revolution, and was a 
lifelong resident of Franklin, dying here in 
1842. His wife, Patty Richardson, to whom 
he was married in 1776, died in 1823. Their 
children were: Willard, born in 1777, who 
died in 1839; Polly, born in 1778, who died 
in 1 795; Marcus, born in 17S0, who died in 
1803; Patty, born in 1783; Ebenezer, born in 
1788, who died in 1796; William, born March 
8, 1790, who died June 23, 1S72; Abigail, 
born in 1795, who died in 1870; Mary, born 
in 1797; and Elizabeth, born in 1801. 

William Metcalf was a farmer, a lumber- 
man, and a dealer in wood and charcoal. He 
served his native town as Selectman, Asses- 
sor, Collector of Taxes, and in 185 1 repre- 
sented it in the State legislature. He was a 
member of the First Congregational Parish. 
His wife, Sallie, who was born at Mendon, 
Mass., April 2, 1797, died on February 25, 
1885. Their children were: William War- 
ren and Alfred G. William Warren, born in 
18 19, was educated at Franklin Academy in 
Franklin, and studied dentistry with Dr. 
Mayo, of Boston. He subsequently practised 
in that city for fifteen years, and died in 1870. 

Alfred G. Metcalf was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Franklin and at Holliston 
Academy. He has always lived at home, 
spending his active period in agriculture. He 
has also done considerable lumbering and 
dealt in wood. He has been a Democrat in 
politics, and has taken a strong interest in 
town affairs. In 1875 he was Selectman. 
He has also been Road Commissioner, and 
was Assessor for two years. A Mason of E.x- 
celsior Lodge of F"ranklin, he is a member of 
the Royal Arch Chapter. He attends the 
Baptist church. 

On December 28, 1845, Mr. Metcalf was 
united in marriage with Charlotte A. Gil- 
more, of Franklin, Mass. She was born Feb- 
ruary 5, 1824, daughter of Joseph and Maria 
(Dilber) Gilmore. The father was a farmer 



and a native of Franklin; and the mother was 
a native of Providence, R.I. Mr. and Mrs. 
Metcalf have been the parents of three chil- 
(h-en : Evelyn E., born September 16, 1846, 
who died in 1865; William S., born May 14, 
1853; and Louisa A., born January 30, 1861. 
William, who is a member and the treasurer 
of the Plainville Stock Company, manufactur- 
ing jewellers, married Ida E. Hcaton, of this 
town, and has two children, namely: Bertha 
L. , born May 9, 1879; and Leroy A., born 
September 25, 1886. Louisa A., who resides 
with her parents, has been a teacher in P'rank- 
lin village for fourteen years. 




son of Walter Bowman, who was born in 
Springfield, N.H. His grandfather. Deputy 
Bowman, who was born in New Hampshire, 
there spent the greater part of his life engaged 
as a tiller of the soil, and was a soldier in the 
War of 1812. Deputy married Margaret Mc- 
Clure, who was born in Southern New Hamp- 
shire of Irish parentage. They reared a fam- 
ily of fourteen children. Both were attend- 
ants of the Baptist church. They both died 
at the age of ninety years. 

After following the tanner's trade in his na- 
tive State for a number of years, Walter Bow- 
man turned his attention to farming. He re- 
moved to Vermont, where he passed his 
remaining days, and died at the age of four- 
score and eight years. In politics he was a 
Jacksonian Democrat. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Abigail Calef, was born in 
Grantham, N.H., being one of the ten chil- 
dren of Nathaniel Calef, a well-to-do farmer 
of that place. Of Walter's six children, 
Sarah P., Abbie M., Sylvester, and Alonzo 
are living. Both parents were members of 
the Baptist church. 

Alonzo Bowman received his education in 
the district schools. When about seventeen 
years old he came to Massachusetts, secured a 
situation as clerk in a grocery store in Bos- 
ton, and was employed in that capacity for 
several years. Subsequently he was engaged 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



in the express business in Brookline until the 
breaking out of the Civil War. Enlisting 
then in Company F, Twenty-sixth Massachu- 
setts Volunteer Infantry, he went South with 
the Nineteenth Army Corps, and was detailed 
to duty in the office of the Provost Marshal 
at Louisiana, being stationed at New Orleans 
for some time. He afterward went with his 
regiment to Virginia, and, joining Sheridan 
in the Shenandoah Valley, was an active par- 
ticipant in some of the most hotly contested 
battles of the entire war, and had several nar- 
row escapes from death. In 1864, his term 
of enlistment having expired, he was dis- 
charged as a private, and returned to Brook- 
line. From 1865 till 1871 he was employed 
in the weighing department of the Boston 
custom-house. In the latter year he was ap- 
pointed a patrolman on the Brookline police 
force. Five years later, in 1876, he was 
made Chief of Police, an office which he has 
since filled with commendable ability. When 
he assumed his present position, the police 
force numbered but seven men. There are 
now thirty-nine men and five horses. An am- 
bulance and a patrol wagon are used. 

Mr. Bowman is a steadfast Republican in 
his political affiliations. In the Masonic fra- 
ternity he has been Marshal for ten years, 
and belongs to Beth-Horon Lodge of Brook- 
line; to St. John Royal Arch Chapter; to De 
Molay Commandery of Boston ; and to Rox- 
bury Council, in which he has taken the 
thirty-second degree. He is likewise a mem- 
ber of the Brookline Lodge of Odd Fellows 
and of the Knights of Honor; is president of 
the Chiefs of Police Association of Brookline, 
and also of the Chiefs of Police Union of 
Massachusetts. Mr. Bowman was married in 
1858 to Miss Ann K. Russell, and has one 
child, Walter H. 



KS. NANCY D. GILLETT, an 
esteemed resident of Walnut Hill, 
was born in Maxfield, Me., Au- 
gust 17, 1833, daughter of Sam- 
Sarah H. (Davis) Mcintosh. On 
the paternal side she is of Scotch descent. 
Her grandfather, Jeremiah Mcintosh, was born 
April 13, 1751, in what is now Hyde Park, 




Mass. He fought for American independence 
in the Revolutionary War, taking part in the 
battle of Lexington, April 19, 1775, as a 
member of Captain Samuel Heath's company. 
In May of the same year he volunteered to 
serve under Captain George Goold, in Colonel 
Sargent's regiment, and was appointed Orderly 
Sergeant. P'rom October, 1775, to February, 
1776, he was on furlough in Dorchester, being 
sick with fever and general prostration. He 
resumed active service in September, 1776, 
under Captain Ebenezer Gore, in the regiment 
commanded by Colonel W. M. Mcintosh, 
which marched to Sawpits, N.Y., where and 
at New Castle, N. Y., near White Plains, he 
performed guard and patrol duty. One of 
Mrs. Gillett's great-grandfathers on the ma- 
ternal side was Benjamin Swett, a sea captain 
of Orrington, Me. Her grandfather, Isaac 
Davis, was a Methodist minister. Samuel 
Mcintosh, her father, was a native of Hyde 
Park, Mass. He and his wife had a family 
of seven children; namely, Elizabeth, Isaac 
D., Lydia K., Elisha, Nancy D., Benjamin 
S., and Eliza Ann. 

Nancy D. Mcintosh attended the district 
school, remaining with her parents until 
twenty-three years of age. In 1856 she ob- 
tained work in East Dedham at Taft's Cotton 
Mills. Thence she moved to Waltham, and 
engaged in dressmaking. There she met Ben- 
jamin F. Gillett, a widower, to whom she was 
married in that town on November 15, 1858. 
After her marriage she went with her husband 
to Rochester, Vt., where he bought a farm, 
which he conducted for some time. In 1874 
Mr. Gillett purchased a lot in Dedham, which 
he cultivated up to the time of his death. 
Though he could not be prevailed upon to ac- 
cept public office, he took a lively interest in 
town and county affairs; and he was an active 
worker for the welfare of the Methodist 
church, acting as class leader for a number of 
years. An exemplary citizen, he was held in 
high esteem by all who knew him. His death 
occurred December 18, 1893. By his first 
wife he had two children: Austin F., now a 
farmer in Bethel, Vt. ; and Ellen M., now 
the widow of C. O. Wiley, a farmer and a 
resident of Rochester, Vt. Mrs. Gillett has 
resided in this vicinity for twenty-three years, 




DANIEL I. KELEHER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



249 



has been an active and valuable church mem- 
ber, and is widely known and respected. She 
has one child, Henry W. , born in Troy, 
N.ll., June 16, i86i, who is now a dentist, 
practising in Newport, R.I. He was married 
June 14, 1893, to Miss Elizabeth Pay, of 
Ensiland. 



X^/lLLARD P. 
^V of the Be 
♦^ '^ Mil lis, was 



CLARK, the chairman 
Board of Selectmen of 
was born in his present resi- 
dence, December 24, 1830, son of James P. 
and Maria F. (Frost) Clark. The farm now 
cultivated by Mr. Clark and his brother was 
cleared from the wilderness by their grand- 
father, John Clark, who erected the dwelling, 
and resided there until his death. 

James P. Clark, who inherited the home- 
stead, conducted it energetically during his 
active years. He was a prominent man in 
his day, holding various town offices, and act- 
ing as Justice of the Peace, and was highly es- 
teemed for his many commendable qualities. 
He died September 6, 1865. His wife, 
Maria, who was a native of Billerica, Mass., 
became the mother of three children; namely, 
Willard P., John M., and James W. John 
M. successively married Martha D. Pierce 
and Mary Clark, and died in August, 1866. 
His widow died in Hyde Park, Mass., Novem- 
ber 2, 1897. James W., who resides at the 
homestead, married Amelia Wallace. Mrs. 
Maria Clark died in 1883. 

Willard P. Clark acquired a common-school 
education, which included a course in the high 
school. He has always lived at the home- 
stead, and he assisted in its cultivation from 
an early day. Since 1865 he and his brother 
have managed it jointly. Besides the home- 
stead proper of one hundred and fourteen 
acres, they own seventy acres of outlying 
land. Willard P. Clark is also engaged in 
the insurance business as agent for the Nor- 
folk, Dedham, Ouincy, Fitchburg, and the 
Traders' and Mechanics' Insurance Com- 
panies. In politics he is a Democrat, and he 
has been the chairman of the Board of Select- 
men for the past thirteen years. He is also a 
Justice of the Peace, and has settled several 
estates. 



Mr. Clark has been twice married. The 
first occasion was on November 9, 1854, when 
he was united to Susan Billings, of Walpole, 
Mass., daughter of Hewins Billings, a farmer 
and stone-cutter of that town. She died in 
April, i860, leaving no children. The sec- 
ond marriage was contracted on November 21, 
1861, with Abbie R. Lovell, of Millis, 
daughter of Asahcl P. and iCliza (Stedman) 
Lovell. She died May 17, 1893, leaving two 
children — Jennie M. and John F. — both of 
whom are residing at home. Mr. Clark occu- 
pies a prominent position both as a business 
man and farmer, and his able public services 
have earned for him the sincere esteem of his 
fellow-townsmen. He is a member of the 
Patrons of Husbandry of Millis. 




EV. DANIEL J. KELEHKR, Ph.D., 
the pastor of St. Joseph's Roman 

to\ Catholic Church, Medway, was born 
in North Andover, Mass., March 6, 
1859, son of James and Mary (Lane) Keleher. 
His parents emigrated from Ireland in 1849, 
first settling in Lawrence, Mass. After grad- 
uating from the Lawrence High School in 
1876, he became a student at Villanova Col- 
lege in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. His 
theological course was pursued at St. Mary's 
University, Baltimore, from which he was 
graduated in 1883. 

Having been ordained to the priesthood by 
Cardinal Gibbons, Father Keleher was as- 
signed as assistant pastor to the Church of St. 
Francis de Sales in Roxbury, Mass. In Sep- 
tember, 1888, he became a member of the 
faculty at St. John's Seminary in Brighton, 
Mass.; and in November, 1896, he came to 
Medway to undertake the pastorate of St. Jo- 
seph's Church. This parish was formerly in 
charge of priests from neighboring towns, in- 
cluding Father Cuddihy, of Milford, and 
Father Ouinlan, of Holliston. Its first regu- 
lar pastor was Father Boylan, now of Charles- 
town, Mass. His successor was Father 
Thomas B. Lownay, who remained nine years, 
and is now stationed in Marlboro. St. Jo- 
seph's church edifice, which was commenced 
by Father Ouinlan, was completed by Father 
Boylan. Under the pastoral care of Father 



25° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Keleher, the entire parish* which includes St. 
Brendan's Church and congregation at North 
Bellingham, is in a flourishing condition. 
Since coming to Medvvay, Father Keleher 
has gained many warm friends. His untiring 
labors in behalf of the church and the general 
morality of the comnuinity are highly appre- 
ciated by his fellow-townsmen. 



lifelong resident of 
(lillis, spent his ac- 



'Y^VT^OSES C. ADAMS, a Selectman of 
Lj^ Millis and an ex-member of the 
rjJ^T Massachusetts legislature, was 
^ ^~^ born where he now resides, No- 

vember 17, 1843, son of Edward and Keziah 
L. (Clark) Adams. Henry Adams, the first 
of his ancestors to settle in this section of the 
county, located upon land in the vicinity of 
the present homestead. Micah Adams, his 
grandfather, who was a 
the locality now called 
tive years in farming. 

Edward Adams, who was also a farmer, 
built the house in which his son now resides. 
He died September 23, 1870. His wife, who 
was a native of Milford, Mass., became the 
mother of five children, as follows: Charles, 
born November 16, 1831, who died September 
24, 1837; Mercy P., born August 26, 1834, 
who married F"rancis O. Phillips, of this 
town: Mary R., born October 24, 1838, who 
is the wife of George Wight, of Medfield, 
Mass.; Edward M., born November 17, 1840, 
who died October 12, 1849; and Moses C, 
the subject of this sketch. Mrs. Keziah 
Adams died January 15, 1891. 

After acquiring a common-school education, 
Moses C. Adams began to assist upon the 
farm where he has always resided. He now 
owns the property, which contains one hun- 
dred acres of fine tillage land. A successful 
agriculturist, his crops are large and of su- 
perior quality: and he raises some excellent 
stock. In ])olitics he is a Republican. He 
has been a member of the Board of Selectmen 
since the incorporation of the town, has 
served as Inspector of Cattle for the last five 
years, is at the present time Street Commis- 
sioner, was chairman of the Board of Assessors 
for five years, and he ably represented Millis 
in the legislature of 1890. 



On June 17, 1880, Mr. Adams was united 
in marriage with Abbie H. Ellis, who was 
born in Milford, March 9, 1850. Her par- 
ents, both now deceased, were Warren and 
Louisa (Cutter) Ellis, of that town, the for- 
mer of whom was a shoemaker by trade. Mr. 
and Mrs. Adams have three children, namely: 
Edward Ellis, born July 27, 1881 ; Bessie K., 
born September 13, 1883; and Lotta M., born 
June 24, i88g. Mr. Adams is connected with 
Medfield Lodge, I. O. O. P., and with the 
Royal Arcanum; and he has been a member of 
the Home Circle since its organization in 
Millis. 



"inxANIEL BROWN, a prosperous busi- 
1^^ ness man of Wrentham, engaged in 
i L^V ^''^^ manufacture of manila hats, 
split braids, etc., was born in Ire- 
land, December 26, 1842. His father, Alex- 
ander Brown, in 1843 emigrated from Ireland 
to the United States, locating in Wrentham. 
Alexander followed cabinet-making here for 
some years, and was also engaged in tilling 
the soil, being the owner of a well-improved 
farm, which is still in the possession of the 
family. He died on his homestead in 1889, 
aged seventy-eight years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Margaret Lawson, bore him 
four children; namely, Ellen, Daniel, John, 
and Alexander. Ellen married Charles S. 
Goddard, of Worcester, Mass., and has three 
children — George, Frank, and Fred. Alex- 
ander is now deceased. 

Daniel Brown was bred and educated in 
Wrentham, having been but an infant when he 
was brought to the country. After leaving 
the district schools, he learned the cabinet- 
maker's trade, which he worked at for five 
years, being an ingenious and skilful artisan. 
He then turned his attention to pattern-mak- 
ing, and was employed for twenty years in 
the straw shop of William E. George. When 
his employer failed, Mr. Brown purchased the 
business, and has since carried it on with 
signal success. He enlarged the plant by 
additions to the buildings as the work in- 
creased, and now gives steady employment to 
about one hundred and eighty people. He has 
purchased a new residence, in which he and his 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



estimable wife extend a gracious hospitality 
to their hosts of friends. 

On July 22, 1868, Mr. IJrowii married 
Miss Esther A. Getchell, who was born in 
Topsfield, Me., daughter of Isaac Getchell. 
They have two children — Charles Edwin and 
Grace G. The son married Grace Arnisbey, 
of Winchester, Mass., and has one child, 
Anna. Mr. Brown cast his first Presidential 
vote in 1864 for Abraham Lincoln, and has 
since been an active worker in the Republi- 
can ranks. In 1896 he was a member of the 
State legislature. He is a member of Wam- 
pum Lodge, No. 195, I. O. O. F., of Wren- 
tham. Both he and his wife attend the Con- 
gregational Church of Wrentham. 



-AMES D. McAVOY, one of the leading 
citizens of Hyde Park, has been identi- 
fied with the interests of this town for 
nearly thee decades, in that time con- 
tributing his full share toward promoting its 
prosperity. He was born September 24, 
1824, in Londonderry, on the north coast of 
Ireland, coming from thrifty Scotch-Irish an- 
cestry. His father, John McAvoy, was a ship- 
per of grain and cattle in Londonderry for a 
number of years, and was very successful in 
business. He subsequently removed to Strat- 
ton. County Tyrone, Ireland, where he died at 
the age of seventy-five. He married Miss 
Ellen Sheran; and they became the parents of 
nine children, of whom James D. is the only 
survivor. Both were Catholics, and their 
children have never departed from the relig- 
ious faith in which they were reared. 

When a boy of thirteen years, James D. 
McAvoy left his native land, and, crossing the 
Atlantic in a sailing-vessel, after a tedious 
passage of two months landed at St. John, 
N.B., where he lived two years. Coming 
then to Boston, he secured work in the gas- 
house at the North End, and proved himself 
so efficient that he was later made foreman of 
a gang of men appointed to lay gas-pipes in 
trenches, remaining in this capacity until 
1841. Going in that year to North Easton, 
Bristol County, a town reached then only by 
stage-coach, he began work in the cutlery fac- 
tory of John Ames, great-grandfather of ex- 



Governor Ame.s, receiving fifteen dollars per 
month, and boarding himself. This was good 
pay, as eight dollars a week was the highest 
price then paid to skilled laborers. He re- 
mained with Mr. Ames until 1849, saving 
meanwhile several hundred dollars from his 
monthly stipend. One of his brothers at that 
time borrowed money of him in order to go to 
California with a company that were to start 
for the gold fields; but at the last moment the 
brother was prevented from going, and Mr. 
McAvoy took his place with scarcely twenty- 
four hours' notice. The company, consisting 
of one hundred and fifty men, sailed in the 
good ship "Edward Everett," manned with a 
crew of twenty-five sailors, on January 10, 
1849, and, after a delightful voyage around 
the Horn, arrived at San Francisco the loth 
day of July. 

Hundreds of vessels were in the bay, and 
five dollars an hour was willingly paid to all 
who would assist in unloading vessels. The 
main body of the company left two days later 
for the mines, the captain with six or seven 
others remaining behind to look after the 
cargo, as well as to convert the "Edward 
Everett " into a steamer. This they did by 
putting in an engine and boiler which they 
had brought with them. The boat was a flat- 
bottomed side-wheeler. Mr. McAvoy, N. A. 
Proctor, Samuel Baker, and a Mr. Perkins, 
who were the most active in the work, are all 
now living in Eastern Massachusetts. In the 
early part of August they made a trial trip 
with the steamer into Suisun Bay, going as far 
as Benecia Bay, now known as Atlantic City. 

Its mining ventures proving unfortunate, 
the company broke up; and the vessel was run 
up Sacramento Bay, and afterward disposed of 
for six thousand dollars, the cargo being 
loaded on to an ox wagon, and taken to the 
mines on Moquelumne River. The trip was 
in every way a discouraging one. There was 
a great scarcity of water, sickness universally 
prevailed among the men, and, being heavily 
overloaded, the oxen gave out, and another 
pair had to be purchased to complete the four- 
ox team. On a foot-hill the cattle evidently 
scented water, and made a dash for the stream. 
Mr. McAvoy, sick and exhausted, left the 
company, and proceeded on foot to the 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Moquelumne River, where a Dr. Hubbard was 
found, who gave him medical attention, charg- 
ing him a fee of five hundred dollars. 

On recovering his health, Mr. McAvoy 
crossed the river to Willow Bend, where he 
worked with shovel and pan, "picking" up 
from thirty to forty dollars a day. Becoming 
dissatisfied, he started with his pack mule for 
the South, going along the Calaveras River to 
General Fremont's claim, "Mariposa," and 
was away si.x months, but never found as good 
picking as he had left. In 1850 he returned 
to Sonora, where there were good "dry dig- 
gins," but was again taken with fever and 
ague. He dosed himself with whiskey and 
quinine, but remained sick for some time, 
going to work, however, in a store at sixteen 
dollars a day, until he should be well enough 
to resume mining. All articles of merchan- 
dise sold high, potatoes and vegetables bring- 
ing a dollar a pound. In the fall of 1852 he 
decided to return home, and wrote to the 
brother whose place he had taken in the com- 
pany to collect the thirteen hundred dollars 
due him from the Ames Company, and come 
at once to California. The brother was thir- 
teen months on the voyage out, being so sick 
when he arrived that Mr. McAvoy remained 
to nurse him, and afterward gave him one 
thousand dollars in gold dust, advising him 
to return to Massachusetts. Since that time 
he has not been definitely heard from. He was 
once reported to have been seen in San Fran- 
cisco, and as the cholera was raging there at 
the time it is very probable that he became its 
victim. Mr. McAvoy came East, and, think- 
ing his brother dead, never returned to the 
mines as he had intended. 

In the fall of 1851, very soon after coming 
from California, he stayed for a short time in 
Sharon, Mass., where he was offered nine dol- 
lars a week to run a trip-hammer, but declined 
the job. He accepted instead a position with 
Mr. -Schenck, of Mansfield, agreeing to give a 
•week's notice before leaving, and was with 
him just two weeks. Going then to Canton, 
he began to make trowels, working as a jour- 
neyman at one dollar and a quarter per day, 
afterward earning as much as seven dollars a 
day at piece work. At length he secured a 
water privilege in Cumberland Hill, R.I., 



and started in business for himself as a trowel 
manufacturer, becoming senior member of the 
firm of McAvoy & Co., taking in as an equal 
partner his former employer, J. B. Schenck, 
and, comiieting with other trowel manufact- 
urers in the Boston market, continued fourteen 
months to manufacture trowels from steel im- 
ported from England, he having charge of the 
inside work, and Mr. Schenck attending to 
the outside management. By bad policy his 
partner involved the company to a fearful ex- 
tent, and disappeared. He was subsequently 
arrested in New York, but only one hundred 
and forty dollars of the company's money 
was recovered ; and it took Mr. McAvoy two 
years to pay off the debts contracted by his 
absconding partner. He next located in Fox- 
boro, Mass., where he manufactured trowels, 
at the same time running a grist-mill nights, 
continuing until 1861, when he disposed of 
his factory. For fifteen years thereafter he 
operated his grist-mill, and in addition car- 
ried on a grocery business, in which he made 
money rapidly, his business becoming suffi- 
cient to warrant him in opening a second store. 

In 1876 he came to Hyde Park, then a 
thriving village, and established a grain store 
in the old government building. He met with 
excellent success from the start, and a few 
years later added coal, brick, lime, and 
cement to his stock, continuing in active 
business until 1889. In 1890 Mr. McAvoy 
was one of the party of one hundred "forty- 
niners" to make a pleasure trip to California, 
being accompanied by his wife and daughter. 
This party, \vhich was away forty-five days, 
received marked attention along the entire 
route, and, carrying letters from the Governor 
of Massachusetts to the Governor of California 
and to the Governors of the intermediate 
States, was royally entertained at every stop- 
ping-place. At San Bernardino they literally 
walked on flowers, a foretaste of their recep- 
tion being given them some hours before they 
reached the city, when a special car, bearing 
representatives from that place, met them, 
bringing fruit, wine, and other choice deli- 
cacies for the inner man". 

Mr. McAvoy was one of the original pro- 
moters of the Hyde Park Electric Light and 
Power Company, of which he has been a di- 




Mr. and Mrs. GEORGE E. HOLBROOK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



2SS 



rector since its organization, and of which he 
was president from 1890 until his resignation 
in October, 1896. In September, 1896, he 
was elected president of the Norfolk Sub- 
urban Electric Railway Company, an office 
which he still holds. He has for some years 
been largely interested in real estate matters, 
and in 1884 he erected his present elegant 
house on Milton Street in Readville. He has 
taken a very prominent part in local affairs, 
having been Selectman four years, one year 
serving as chairman of the board ; and during 
the entire time he was also Highway Sur- 
veyor. He is now one of the State Board of 
Park Commissioners. In politics he is a 
strong gold Democrat. 

Mr. McAvoy was married June i, 1851, to 
Miss Mary Morrison, a native of Sharon, 
Mass. Of their four children but one is liv- 
ing, a daughter, Nellie L. 




ENTON P. CROCKER, M.D., a 
young and prominent physician of 
Foxboro, was born March 13, 1867, 
in Hyannis, Mass., son of Benjamin 
F. Crocker. The latter was born in Barn- 
stable, Mass., where he is now actively en- 
gaged in business, being one of the foremost 
residents of the place. For many years he 
has been profitably engaged in lumber dealing 
and brick-making. He has also cultivated 
cranberries with success. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Caroline P. Pulsifer, was 
born in Eden, Me., daughter of the late Dr. 
Moses R. Pulsifer, who was a prominent ho- 
moeopathic physican of Ellsworth, Me. They 
have reared four children, namely: Willard 
C, a former physician of Foxboro, but now 
of Springfield, Mass., who married Anna 
Pond, of this town; Augusta P., who is the 
wife of James V. Turner, a designer of 
woollen fabrics; Bertha, a school-teacher in 
Springfield, Mass.; and Benton P., the sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Benton P. Crocker received his elementary 
education in the district schools of Cape Cod. 
Afterward he pursued a course at Amherst 
College and at the medical department of the 
University of Vermont. He subsequently at- 
tended the Bellevue Hospital Medical College 



of New York City, from which he received 
the degree of Doctor of Medicine with the 
class of 1891. He then obtained experience 
and a practical knowledge of his profession at 
the New York Lying-in Hospital, where he 
remained as assistant resident physician for 
nearly a year. In September, 1894, Dr. 
Crocker came to Foxboro, where he has made 
rapid strides in the practice of his profession. 
The share of patronage he has already won in 
Foxboro gives promise of a very successful 
future. 

The Doctor is a member of the medical so- 
cieties of Massachusetts and Norfolk County. 
He was made an Odd Fellow in Excelsior 
Lodge, No. 87, of Foxboro. He is also a 
member and the medical examiner of the 
United Order of the Golden Cross, and of the 
United Order of Pilgrim F"athers, Cocasset 
Colony. Taking much interest in agricultural 
questions, he also belongs to Foxboro 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. A member of 
the Universalist church, his religious creed is 
liberal. 



/^JeORGE E. HOLBROOK, one of the 
\ '•) I most prominent farmers in Norfolk, 
^ — was born December 14, 1839, upon 
the farm he now owns and occupies, son of 
George E. and Clarissa (Turner) Holbrook. 
The paternal grandfather, Daniel Holbrook, 
who served as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War, was a resident of Norfolk for the greater 
part of his life and the original owner of the 
Holbrook homestead. His death occurred 
April 17, 1839. He wedded Mary Edwards, 
and reared three children, namely: Eliza E., 
born in 1802; Mary B., born January 13, 
1804, who married Silas J. Holbrook; and 
George E. , father of the subject of this 
sketch. None are now living. 

George E. Holbrook (first) was born in 
Norfolk, September 13, 1S06, and died in 
1859. He inherited the home farm, which he 
had helped to clear; and he cultivated it suc- 
cessfully during his active years. He was ac- 
tive in military affairs, serving as a Major in 
the State militia. His wife, Clarissa, who 
was a native of Medfield, Mass., became the 
mother of three children, as follows: Silas 



2i;6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



P., M.D., who married Jennie Campbell, and 
is a practising physician in East Douglas, 
Mass.; George E., the subject of this sketch; 
and Mary E., who married Edwin F. Cowell, 
a veteran of the Civil War, and a conductor on 
the New England Railroad, residing in Dor- 
chester, Mass. The mother died in 1889. 

George E. Holbrook, the subject of this 
sketch, attended schools in Norfolk and 
VVrentham, completing his studies at the age 
of eighteen. He has always resided at the 
homestead, assisting his father in its cultiva- 
tion. After caring for his mother during her 
declining years, he succeeded to the farm. 
The property contains eighty-seven acres of 
well-improved land, located in one of the 
most fertile districts of the State, and is de- 
voted to general farming, dairying, and fruit- 
growing. In 1873 Mr. Holbrook engaged in 
the provision business in Boston, but with- 
drew from that enterprise a year later, prefer- 
ring to give his entire attention to his farm. 
Politically, he is a Republican, and has for 
years been identified with local public affairs. 
He served with ability as Highway Surveyor 
for five years, was Collector of Ta.xes for eight 
years. Constable for two years ; and he has 
been on the Board of Assessors in all for over 
sixteen years, having been the first Assessor 
of Norfolk after its incorporation. At the 
present time he is special police officer, and 
he fills other town offices. He is Master of 
Norfolk Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and 
a charter member of Mount Nebo Council, 
Royal Arcanum of Medfield. 

In 1870 Mr. Holbrook married Estella L. 
Pond, daughter of Henry E. and Louisa B. 
Pond, of Franklin, Mass. Her father, now 
deceased, was an inventor, and for some time 
a depot agent in that town. Her mother re- 
sides in Holliston, Mass. Mrs. Holbrook is 
the mother of five children; namely, Estella 
L. , George P., Warner Howard, Sarah 
Fisher, and Louisa, all of whom are residing 
at home. All the members of the family are 
musicians, and frequently furnish music for 
dancing parties, receptions, and other social 
functions. Mr. Holbrook has taught music 
and led orchestras, and Mrs. Holbrook spent 
some time in Germany studying music. She 
is a member of the Congregational church. 




iHARLES N. MORSE, of Foxboro, 
is engaged in the Christian work of 
bringing up children placed under 
his protection by the Boston Chil- 
dren's Aid Society. He was born in North 
Foxboro, Mass., March 5, 1833, son of Newell 
Morse. His great-grandfather, Amos Morse 
(first), took up land here at an early day, and 
erected thereon a saw-mill in the place now 
occupied by Boynton's grist-mill. He cleared 
a part of the land, carrying on farming and 
milling until his demise. 

Amos Morse (second), the grandfather of 
Charles N., was born on the old homestead, 
which subsequently became his by inheri- 
tance. During his active life he was likewise 
engaged in lumbering and farming, and he im- 
proved the property in many ways. His wife. 
Submit Paine Morse, belonged to a family 
that was founded here in Colonial times. 
Newell Morse, his second-born child, suc- 
ceeded to the occupations of his ancestors, and 
with his brother Leonard inherited the ances- 
tral acres. During the later days of his life, 
which was closed at the age of sixty-two years, 
Newell was exclusively engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits. He married Miss Sally F. 
Mann, who bore him six children, namely: 
Charles N. , the subject of this sketch; Helen 
F., who died in childhood; Edson A., who 
lives on the old homestead near the Neponset 
Reservoir; Eliza A., who married A. J. 
Daniels, of this town, and has four children; 
Julius E. , of Wrentham; and Elwin C, a real 
estate dealer in Boston. 

Charles N. Morse obtained his education in 
the district schools. Beginning when quite 
young, he was employed in the Union Straw 
Works for twenty consecutive years. Subse- 
quently, in Milford, Mass., he had charge of 
the straw department in a factory for four 
years. Returning then to Foxboro, he pur- 
chased the Hartshorn farm of one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, where in recent years he 
has cared for the boys sent to him by the 
benevolent organization above referred to. 
Twenty-three boys are now there. They are 
trained so that they may be able to do for 
themselves in due time, and become worthy 
citizens of the republic. 

Mr. Morse was married November 19, 1856, 




CLIFFORD BKLCHER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIKW 



259 



to Miss Hester Maria Maybury, of Otisfield, 
Me. They have two children — Frank A. 
and Mabel E. The latter is a student at 
Wellesley College. Frank A., after attend- 
ing Amherst College, graduated from the 
Harvard Medical School, and has since been 
prosperously engaged in the medical profes- 
sion at Lynn, Mass. He married Miss 
Blanche Boardman, of Lowell, Mass., and has 
one child, Beatrice Morse. Mr. Morse, Sr., 
has been an advocate of Republican principles 
since he cast his first Presidential vote in 
1856 for John C. Fremont, and has served as 
a member of the School Committee. He has 
recently united with the local society of the 
Knights of Honor. In 1851 he joined the 
Congregational Church of Foxboro, and since 
then has been twice elected a Deacon. He 
was also a Deacon of the Congregational 
Church of Milford. 



OVLBERT H. BIRD, a well-known and 
j^A respected citizen of Brookline, was 
/j\\ born in Boston, Mass., January 18, 
— " 1 84 1, son of Harrison and Lucy 
(Willson) Bird. His grandfather, Seth Bird, 
was engaged in teaming in Portland, Me., for 
a number of years; and in that city Harrison 
Bird was born, reared, and educated. When 
a young man, Harrison Bird came to Boston, 
and was employed for some time in a market 
as clerk for his uncle. He then established 
a stall of his own, and was for sixty years in 
the provision business in Faneuil Hall 
Market. He was one of the oldest market- 
men in Faneuil Hall, and was widely known 
and very popular. In 1847 he moved to 
Brookline, where he lived thirty-five years, 
and erected a handsome residence. He died 
at the age of eighty-five. He attended the 
Swedenborgian church. His wife, a native of 
Boston, died at the age of seventy-two. She 
was the mother of three children, two of whom 
have passed away. 

Albert H. Bird passed the first seven years 
of his life in Dorchester, now a part of Bos- 
ton. He acquired his education in the public 
schools of Brookline, and on leaving school 
went into business with his father. After 
the death of the latter he sold out the busi- 



ness, and has since been retired. He built 
his present handsome residence at 246 Har- 
vard Street, Brookline, in 1888. 

Mr. Bird was married in 1864 to Eliza A., 
daughter of William Churchill, of Brookline. 
Mrs. Bird was born in Dorchester, Mass. 
Her father, a wealthy fish merchant, with a 
place of business at Long Wharf, ]5oston, died 
at the age of sixty. Mrs. Bird died at the age 
of fifty-five. Mr. Bird is a gentleman of cult- 
ure, interested in literature and art. He is 
an extensive reader, and is conversant with 
the best English authors. 



T^LIFFORD BELCHER, who died on 
I \t^ Sejiteraber 15, 1897, at his home in 
^^^^^ Canton, was born in this town in 
1821, and was the third in direct 
line to bear that name. He came of substan- 
tial English stock, represented in the Massa- 
chusetts Colony before 1640 by Edward Bel- 
cher, of Boston; Andrew Belcher, of Cam- 
bridge; Gregory Belcher, of Boston and later 
of Cambridge; and Jeremy Belcher, of Ipswich. 
Mr. Belcher's grandfather, Clifford Belcher, 
first, was born, lived, and died in Canton, 
spending his long years in useful activity. 

His son, Clifford Belcher, second, was born 
and reared in Canton, and for many years was 
known as one of the most energetic, industri- 
ous, and valued citizens of the place. He 
owned a small farm, which he carried on in 
connection with carpentering. He built in 
1845 the house now owned by his son Clifford, 
and there spent his last days in comfort and 
plenty, passing away at the venerable age of 
eighty-six years. In his earlier life he was an 
adherent of the Democratic party, but in later 
years was a strong advocate of the principles 
of the Republican party. He was for some 
years Selectman, and held other offices of minor 
importance. To him and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary McKendry, seven chil- 
dren were born, only one of whom is now liv- 
ing; namely, Sarah, wife of A. W. Kinsley. 

Clifford I3e!cher, third, attended the common 
schools of Canton until eighteen years of age. 
He then went to Easton and learned the 
moulder's trade in the foundry with his 
brother, Daniel Belcher. In 1845 he re- 



26o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



turned to Canton, and entered into the service 
of the Kinsley Iron and Machine Company. 
In 1866 he estahlished a foundry of his own 
on Walnut Street, which he conducted suc- 
cessfully for many years. For the last seven 
years Mr. Belcher lived retired from active 
pursuits, enjoying a well-deserved leisure, a 
much respected citizen. He was a Rejiublican 
in politics, but was never an aspirant for office. 
Mr. Belcher was twice married. His first 
wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth B. 
Spair, died in 1881, leaving four children, 
namely- Fred C, Charles E., Addie L., and 
Elmer A. Mr. Belcher married September 
10, 1883, Miss L. Arvilla Dean, of Easton, 
Mass. With his wife he attended the Congre- 
gational church, to whose support he was a lib- 
eral contributor. 



/lYc 



EORGE HOLLISTER BROWN, an 
VI^T ^l'^'"'^' enterprising, and far-sighted 

— business man, engaged in dealing in 
real estate and mortgages, conveyancing, and 
insurance business in Quincy, Mass., was born 
in Detroit, Mich., March 17, 1870, a son of 
Charles Hall and Georgianna (Newcomb) 
Brown. 

His paternal grandfather, Nathan Hollister 
Brown, was born and bred in Charlton, Sara- 
toga County, N.Y., the date of his birth being 
May 10, 1815. He was active in town affairs, 
holding the office of Supervisor for several 
years, and was familiarly known as "Squire" 
Brown. After the close of the Civil War, in 
which he served as Captain of Company H, 
New York Seventy-seventh Regiment, State 
Volunteers, he removed to Detroit, Mich., 
where he carried on business as a contractor 
and builder. He was subsequently appointed 
as an officer in the House of Correction at De- 
troit, serving there for some time. He was a 
man of much mechanical ingenuity and the 
inventor of a freight-car roofing. He attained 
the age of si.xty-eight years and seven months, 
passing to the life eternal February 20, 1884. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Amanda 
Hall, was born in Southeast, Putnam County, 
N.Y., August 19, 1815, and died in Detroit, 
October 23, 1876. 

Charles Hall Brown was born July 5, 1849, 



at Charlton, Saratoga County, N.Y. Having 
completed his schooling in his native State, at 
the age of sixteen years he secured employment 
at Dr. Spence's drug store in Detroit, whither 
his parents had removed and at seventeen he 
was putting uj) prescriptions, being the young- 
est prescription clerk the proprietor had ever 
known, proving himself efficient and trust- 
worthy. Marrying in 1868, he continued to 
live in Detroit up to the date of his appoint- 
ment, in 1 87 1, as the general Western agent 
of the Frederick Stearns's Drug Company, in 
which capacity he was engaged in travelling 
most of the time for about fifteen years, hav- 
ing his headquarters at St. Louis, the home 
of the family being in Detroit as before. Re- 
moving to Little F"alls, Minn., in 1888, he 
established a drug store in that city, and has 
since conducted a satisfactory business, hav- 
ing built up an extensive trade. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. His wife, 
who was a daughter of Dr. George Newcomb, of 
Quincy, Mass., died December 24, 1881, leav- 
ing three children, as follows: Charles Fred- 
erick, proprietor of the Brown Electrical Con- 
struction Company of New Haven, Conn. ; 
George Hollister; and Herbert Stanley, pro- 
fessor of mathematics at the Episcopal Acad- 
emy in Cheshire, Conn. Both of the parents 
were endowed with musical talent; and for 
some years the mother was the principal alto 
singer in one of the large churches of Detroit, 
and afterward officiated as organist in an 
Episcopal church in that city. Mrs. Brown 
was also an instructor in a music school, and 
had a large class of private pupils. 

George H. Brown, the special subject of 
this sketch, obtained the rudiments of his ed- 
ucation in the Coddington School, Quincy, 
which he attended in 1875, afterward continu- 
ing his studies at a private school in Detroit 
and in the public schools of that city. At the 
age of twelve years he obtained a situation in 
the office of the Michigan Central Railway 
Company, and continued in the railroad busi- 
ness until coming to Quincy three years later. 
He secured work in Boston as a clerk in the 
office of an insurance publication, with which 
he was connected a year. In 1886 he opened 
an office as public stenographer and typewrit- 
ist, but closed it three months later when he 



BIOGRAPHICA], REVIEW 



26r 



was appointed an assistant in the secretary's 
office of the New England Insurance Ex- 
change. He remained there a year, and in 
the meantime formed a partnership with Al- 
fred E. Cram, under the firm name of (jeorge 
H. Brown & Co., and opened offices in the 
Chadwick Building, Boston, for shorthand 
work, continuing until 1888. Prior to that 
time he had formed a liking for insurance 
work, and in the winter of 1887 had taken out 
an insurance broker's license, and had solic- 
ited fire risks, confining his operations to 
Ouincy chiefly. In 1888 he opened an office 
in the Durgin & Merrill Block, and soon, in 
addition to his insurance business, added that 
of real estate, mortgages, and kindred matters, 
removing to his present offices in the Adams 
linilding in 1889. Frequently requested by 
his numerous customers to prepare legal in- 
struments, he determined to fit himself for 
that work, and accordingly took a two years' 
course of study at the Boston University Law 
School, continuing his business here at the 
same time. 

In iSqi Mr. Brown was appointed by the 
late Governor Russell Justice of the Peace, 
and in 1893 he received his appointment as 
Notary Public. His business has greatly in- 
creased, his dealing in realty and mortgages 
being e.xtensive; and as a fire insurance agent 
he represents several of the old and reliable 
stock and mutual insurance companies. He 
is a trustee of several estates, and has the 
management of a number of trust estates, mak- 
ing a specialty of the care of property. He 
collects rents and incomes, settles estates of 
deceased persons, etc. 

Mr. Brown is a Republican, and, although 
interested in politics, has never held public 
office. He is a member of the Royal .Society 
of Good Fellows, of which he has been secre- 
tary since its formation in 1889; is a direc- 
tor in the Young Men's Christian Association, 
which he assisted in organizing; is a director 
in the Ouincy Board of Trade; is a member 
of the Ouincy Board of Fire Underwriters; 
and in 1891 assisted in the organization 
of the Quincy Musical Club, and became its 
first president. He has inherited some of the 
musical talent of his parents, and, while at- 
tending the law school, was a member and 



the manager for one season of the Boston Uni- 
versity Glee Club. He is one of the Wardens 
of the Episcopal church, and takes an active 
interest in church work. Mr. Brown is a 
member of the Quincy Historical Society, the 
Yacht Club, and the Wollaston Golf Club. 

On the 22d of February, 1893, Mr. Brown 
married Miss Mabel Lewis Pollock, daughter 
of Allen F. Pollock, of Quincy. Three chil- 
dren have been born to them, and two are liv- 
ing; namely, Madeleine Pollock and Francis 
Irving. 




ALTER S. WESTON, a Boston 
,S)\I contractor and builder, was born in 
Duxbury, Plymouth County, Mass., 
November 12, 1852, son of Augustus Weston 
and Elmira White Weston, and belongs to an 
old Massachusetts family of English descetit. 
His paternal grandfather, Galon Weston, a 
ship-builder of Duxbury, married Judith 
Frost. They were Unitarians; and their six 
children — Samuel, Judith, Seth, Margaret, 
Augustus, and Caroline — were brought up in 
that faith. 

The son Augustus learned the shoemaker's 
trade in his youth, but afterward became a 
butcher, and also engaged in agriculture. He 
enlisted in the Union Army, in Company I of 
the Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volun- 
teers, December 6, 1862, was made Sergeant 
of his company, and served until the close of 
the war. After his return to Duxbury he de- 
voted his time to farming and to the public 
affairs of the town. He was a Republican, 
and represented the district in the legislature. 
He also held the office of Assessor, always 
taking a lively interest in the political ques- 
tions of the day. His death occurred October 
18, 1873. His wife was a daughter of Bart- 
lett White, of Duxbury, and was one of a 
family of three children. Mr. White, who 
was a butcher by trade, carried on the express 
business between Duxbury and Boston. He 
was a man of influence in the town. The off- 
spring of Mr. and Mrs. Weston were twelve 
in number, of whom seven are now liv- 
ing, namely: Walter S. ; Amelia, who mar- 
ried James Walley, and resides in Hyde 
Park; Samuel; Henry; Harry; Thomas; and 



262 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Hattie, who married Elmer Leach, of Dux- 
bury. 

Walter S. Weston lived at home until four- 
teen years old. At that early age he went to 
Boston to learn the mason's trade, which he 
followed as a journeyman until able to go into 
business for himself. In 1872 he decided to 
try his fortunes in California, and journeyed 
thither by way of the Isthmus of Panama. 
For some time he was employed on the Capi- 
tol Building in Carson City, Nev., setting 
stone which was cut from the quarries by the 
inmates of the county jail. He spent a year 
in the State of Nevada, and returned to Bos- 
ton upon the death of his father in the fall of 
1873. As the eldest son he undertook the en- 
tire support of his widowed mother and her 
large family, and cheerfully supplied their 
every need. He built extensively in St. 
John, N. B., after the great fire of 1877. 
Going South in 1890, he was located for a 
year in Cardip, Tenn., and subsequently in 
Alabama. Upon his return to Boston he was 
placed upon the police force, and remained a 
patrolman in the South Cove district for three 
years. Again making a change, he was em- 
ployed as foreman in the establishment of 
Messrs. Weston & Sheppard, of which firm 
his uncle was the senior partner. During his 
business career in Boston many fine hotels 
have been erected by Mr. Weston, notably one 
on the corner of Marlboro and E.xeter Streets, 
the fine structure on the corner of Boylston 
Street and Massachusetts Avenue, also that on 
Massachusetts Avenue and Haviland Street. 
Fourteen houses on Haviland Street, between 
Massachusetts Avenue and Parker Street, va- 
rious apartment houses on Commonwealth 
Avenue, aLso Hotel Ludlow, opposite Trin- 
ity Church, and the remodelled Hotel Plaza, 
are specimens of his business achievements. 

He married July 3, 1876, Minnie Calder, of 
Nova Scotia. Of this union two children 
have been born — Walter A. and Minnie B. 
Since 1887 Mr. Weston and his family have 
resided in Hyde Park. 

Politically, he is a Republican, and for the 
past two years has been a member of the 
Board of Selectmen. He is a charter mem- 
ber of the Knights of Malta; a member of the 
Aberdour Lodge, F. & A. M., of Boston, and 



of the Norfolk Royal Arch Chapter, Hyde 
Park Council, R. & S. M.; and Cyprus Com- 
mandery, K. T. ; also of Mount Forest Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., No. 148, of Hyde Park; was 
formerly a member of the Independent Order 
of Red Men, now a member of the Royal Ar- 
canum, Alpha, No. I, and was at one time a 
member of the Lancers of Boston. He has 
also been connected with the Boston Builders' 
E.xchange and with the Mechanic Exchange 
of the city of Boston. An influential member 
of the Universalist church, Mr. Weston at the 
present time holds the president's chair of the 
Board of Trustees in that society. 



OHN FLAVEL JENKINS MAYO, 
better known as John F. J. Mayo, for 
many years a prominent manufacturer 
of Norfolk County, was born in Rox- 
bury, Mass., in 1819, and died at his home in 
Needham, August 11, 1893. He belonged to 
an old Massachusetts family, dating from 
early Colonial times. 

"The Roxbury Mayos," says Francis S. 
Drake in his history of the town, "are de- 
scended from John, a young child brought 
over in 1633 by Robert Gamblin, Jr., and 
who was the son of his wife by a former hus- 
band. He married in 1654 Hannah, daughter 
of John Graves." "Thomas, son of John 
Mayo, was born in 1673." A later Thomas 
Mayo, father of the late Mr. John F. J. Mayo, 
was born at Roxbury in 1765, and was for 
many years a merchant in Roxbury and in 
Boston. He died at the age of fifty-eight 
years. His wife, who was the daughter of 
Deacon Davis, of Roxbury, died in 1856. 

Having received his education in the Rox- 
bury schools, John F. J. Mayo began his 
working life as an assistant in a jewelry store, 
where he remained for some time. Not liking 
the business, however, he left it, and learned 
the trade of carpenter and builder, at which he 
worked for many years. He then engaged in 
the business of manufacturing glue in Rox- 
bury, removing his plant in 1855 to Need- 
ham, and operating for some time in this 
town. His partner for sixteen years was 
Edwin I-^vans, and the business was carried on 
under the name of Evans & Mayo. At the 




CHARLES W. THAYER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



265 



end of that time Mr. Mayo began to work at 
his trade again as a member of the firm of 
Gould & Mayo, which continued for eight 
years. He then retired from active business 
life. 

On April 20, 184S, Mr. Mayo was married 
to Ellen E. Eaton, daughter of William and 
Sally (Johnson) Eaton, of Needham. Mr. 
I'^aton represented one of the old and honored 
families of this region, and was himself a 
broad-minded, public-spirited citizen, and for 
some years Selectman of the town. He had 
a family of nine children, as follows: George 
Eaton, born in 1819, now residing in Needham; 
Emily, born in 1821, who died in 1885, wife 
of George H. Gay; Augustus, born in 1823, a 
resident of Needham; Charles, born in 1824, 
who died in infancy; Ellen E., now Mrs. 
Mayo; Mary J., who was born in 1828, and 
died in 1889; Adeline, born in 1830, who 
was married in 1864 to John Morton Harris, 
late resident of Needham, whose life is 
sketched on another page of this work; 
Charles W. Eaton, born May 30, 1833, who 
married Lucetta Hunt, of Sudbury, and is 
now in the clothing business in Boston; 
Everett J., the youngest son, born in 1837, 
who married Lydia Euller, of Wellesley, lived 
in Needham until his death in June, 1896, 
and was well-known in the express and livery 
business and as a prominent politician. 

Mr. Mayo is survived by his wife and one 
child, a daughter, Alice E., who was born in 
1859, was married to Charles Atherton Hicks 
in 1883, and resides in Needham. 

Mr. Mayo was deeply interested for many 
years in the work of the F"irst Parish Church, 
Unitarian Congregational, both he himself 
and Mrs. Mayo being members thereof. He 
was one of the Parish Committee, and one of 
the Building Committee when the church 
edifice was removed. In politics Mr. Mayo 
was a Republican, and ever ready to work for 
his party or to contribute liberally for the ad- 
vancement of its interests. In 1850 he was 
elected member of the Council of Roxbury for 
two years, and he was also for many years a 
member of the Roxbury Artillery Company. 
He took an active interest in all town im- 
provements, and was a generous promoter of 
reforms. 




HARLES W. THAYER, a promi- 
nent farmer of Bellingham, was born 
in this place, October 22, 1824, 
son of Willard and Rhoda (Sher- 
man) Thayer, both natives of Bellingham. 

Willard, son of Ebenezer Thayer, was a 
carriage-maker in early life, afterward devot- 
ing himself to farming. In 1837 he built 
the house now owned by his son; and he died 
there, December 17, 1878, his wife surviving 
until November 28, 1889. They had nine 
children, namely: James A,, a mechanic by 
trade, who spent much of his life in Belling- 
ham, and died in Providence, R.I., March 4, 
1887; Charles W. ; Henry Franklin, who 
died February 16, 1833, at the age of four 
years; Barton D., who married Laura Ban- 
croft (deceased), and who lives in New York 
City, where he has charge of the Cornelius 
Vanderbilt place; Olney S., who died in 
1887; Mary Frances, the wife of Edward V. 
Light, a machinist of Providence, R. I. ; Ade- 
line, who married John W. Randall, of Provi- 
dence; William Henry, who is married and 
resides in Providence; Rhoda Mandella, who 
is the wife of William Brittin, a carpenter, 
and resides in Milford, Mass. 

Charles W. Thayer, the second son, was 
well educated at the common and high schools 
of the county, and lived at home with his par- 
ents until he married, at twenty-one years of 
age. He then purchased the entire interest 
in the old homestead farm of thirty acres at 
South Bellingham, where he now resides. 
He has made all the improvements on the 
place, including the erection of new build- 
ings. He has also engaged in different real 
estate transactions, and he is now the owner 
of other houses and lands in the vicinity. 
He has devoted most of his attention to farm- 
ing, but, owing to somewhat failing health 
during the past few years, has been obliged to 
take a less active part in the farm work than 
formerly. 

He married October 23, 1845, Betsey W. 
Aldrich, who was born in Mendon, Mass., 
July 7, 1826, daughter of Allen and Sarah 
(Scott) Aldrich. Mr. and Mrs. Aldrich had 
four children: Betsey W. : Phcebe, wife of C. 
Cooper, a retired merchant of New York City; 
Sylvanus; and Allen — the last two being de- 



266 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ceased. The father was a farmer of Mcndon, 
and died there in 1834. The mother married 
a second husband, James Burchard, and had 
five children; namely, Daniel, Francis (de- 
ceased), Joseph, Charles, and George, de- 
ceased. She died in Killingham, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thayer have one child, a 
daughter, Ella F., born August 15, 1855. 
She married Charles E. Delmage, who is in 
the fruit and confectionery business, and re- 
sides in Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Thayer is a Republican in politics, and 
has always cast his vote for the candidates of 
that party. Though he belongs to no secret 
orders, and has always refused public office, 
he is a well-known, popular, and influential 
citizen. His farm is well improved and a 
credit to his industry. The products of his 
dairy are well known to the people of the vi- 
cinity. 




lERRITT S. KEITH, one of the 
foremost provision dealers of 
Wellesley Hills, and a son of 
Samuel and Mary (Price) Keith, 
was born in Havelock, N.B., in 1850. The 
father was born in New Brunswick in 1792, 
and was engaged in farming there until the 
time of his death in 1868. By the first of his 
two marriages there were four children — 
John, Charles, Noah, and Hattie. Born of 
the second marriage, which was contracted 
with Mary Price, of New Brunswick, were 
eight children — Elizabeth, Isaiah, Ezekiel, 
David, Victoria, Jane, Theodore, and Merritt. 
Isaiah died in 1887. The mother was eighty- 
one years old at her death in 1888. 

Leaving the public schools of Havelock 
when he was eighteen years old, Merritt 
Keith went to work on the farm. In 1872 he 
came to Massachusetts, and was employed 
in the express business with Everett J. Eaton, 
of Needham, during the ensuing si.\ years. 
Then he was engaged in the provision busi- 
ness at Highlandville for one year, after 
which he moved to Needham village. In 1887 
he came from there to Wellesley, and engaged 
in the same business. He has a good busi- 
ness now, supplying customers in Needham 
and Wellesley Hills with general provisions, 



including meats, canned goods, vegetables, 
and fruit. 

Mr. Keith is a member of the Eliot Lodge, 
No. 158, I. O. O. F., of Needham; and of 
Wellesley Grange, P. of H. In politics he is 
a thorough Republican, and he is a regular 
attendant of the Congregational Church at 
Wellesley Hills. He was married March i, 
1877, to Ida, daughter of William Herring, 
who belongs to one of the old families of 
Needham. The children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Keith are: Eva, born in 1878, now attending 
the high school; Harold F., born in 1880, a 
student of the Burdett Commercial College; 
Laura Pearl, born in 1884, who attends the 
grammar school; and Malcomb, born in 1886, 
who is a pupil of the intermediate school. 



rmo 



EORGE R. MANN and his brother, 
V |5T WILLIAM R. MANN, cotton 
^ — manufacturers of Sharon, are sons of 
George Harvey and Rhoda (Fisher) Mann ; and 
their father was a pioneer in the cotton indus- 
try of New England. 

They are descendants in the seventh genera- 
tion of William Mann, who was born in the 
county of Kent, England, in 1607, and emi- 
grated to the Massachusetts Bay colony at an 
early date, settling in Cambridge. In 1637 
he married Mary Jerauld and on June 11, 
1657, he married for his second wife Alice 
Teal. William Mann died March 7, 1662. 
Samuel Mann, only son of William, was born 
July 6, 1647, and was one of the early stu- 
dents of Harvard College, where he was grad- 
uated in 1667. He settled at Wrentham, 
Mass., in 1673, and died May 22, 1719. His 
wife, Esther Ware, of Dedham, Mass., whom 
he married on May 13, 1673, died in Septem- 
ber, 1730. Samuel and Esther Mann were the 
parents of eleven children; namely, Mary, 
Samuel, Nathaniel, William, Theodore, 
Thomas, Hannah, Beria, Pelatiah, Margaret, 
and Esther. 

Nathaniel, the next in line, was born in 
Dedham, April 8, 1677. On December 19, 
1704, he married Elizabeth Georges, and his 
children were: George, John, Nathaniel, 
Mary, Robert, Jeremiah, Joseph, Ezra, Rich- 
ard, and Timothy. Ezra Mann, great-grand- 



BIOGRAIMIICAL REVIEW 



267 



father of the subjects of this sketcli, was born 
in VVrcntham, October 13, 17 19. On July 
16, 1752, he married Esther Ncwland. They 
reared a family of four children — Otis, 
Rufus, Esther, and Jeremiah. 

Rufus Mann, grandfather of the present 
generation, was born in Wrenthani, August 
26, 1755. He was Sergeant in Captain Sabin 
Mann's company of minute-men, who marched 
from Medfield to Boston, April 19, 1775; and 
he also rendercti further service, for which he 
received a United States pension near the 
close of his life. He followed the black- 
smith's and cooper's trades during his active 
years, and died August 26, 1837. On Janu- 
ary 25, 1 78 1, he married Sybil Allen, who 
was born in Medfield, Mass., April 13, 1757, 
and died November 10, 1838. Rufus and 
Sybil Mann lived in Medfield until 1814, 
when they moved to Wrentham. They were 
the parents of five children: Sarah, born Janu- 
ary 2, 1782; Rodney, born March 15, 1784: 
Susanna, born September 7, 1785; George 
Harvey, born -September 16, 1793; and Jer- 
auld Newland Ezra, who was born June 20, 
1796, and married Betsey Kingsbury, of Wal- 
pole, February 16, 1822. Receiving the ajj- 
pointment of Sheriff for Norfolk County in 
1835, he held that office and that of jailer for 
twenty-one years, and then resigned on ac- 
count of his health. He moved to Vernon, 
Conn., and died there in April, 1857. Sarah 
Mann married Daniel Everett, January i, 
1807; and she died March 16, 1808. Rodney 
died in Buenos Ayres, South America, April 
16, 1S26. Susanna became the wife of Timo- 
thy Palmer Whitney, who was for a number of 
years Sheriff of Norfolk County. 

George Harvey Mann, second son of Rufus, 
and the father of George R. and William R. 
Mann, was born in Medfield, and lived there 
until he was si.xteen years old. He then went 
to Mansfield, and was apprenticed to Messrs. 
Otis and Oliver Allen to learn the trade of a 
carpenter. In 18 14 he went under an agree- 
ment with others to Greenwich, Conn., to 
work in a machine shop. While there he 
was one of a number of men that were called 
out to throw up fortifications to resist the 
British, who were ravaging the coast. From 
Greenwich he went to Medway village, and 



was engaged in the manufacture of cotton ma- 
chinery and cotton goods, being associated 
with John and I'eter Smith, Dean Walker, 
and Oliver Dean. He stayed there until 
1822, when he removed to East Walpole, and 
took charge of the Neponset Cotton Manufact- 
uring Company factory, where he remained 
until 1826, when he went to Amoskeag, 
N.H., taking his family with him. While 
there he changed the works from sheetings to 
bed-tickings, and established the reputation of 
the celebrated Amoskeag tickings. Not find- 
ing it for his interest to remain, he returned 
to his old position in East Walpole. In 1831 
he purchased of Joseph W. Revere a water 
privilege in Sharon, erected a factory, and 
commenced the manufacture of bed-ticking 
that held the first price in the market, the 
business continuing until March 10, 1840, 
when his factory was destroyed by fire. In 
1 841 he erected a building on another site, 
and commenced the construction of machinery, 
for the manufacture of cotton duck for sails. 
In 1843 he filled the building with machinery, 
and started on his new venture in company 
with his eldest son. His health failing, in 
1844 he sold out his interest in the concern 
to his youngest son. He died October 25, 
1847. George H. Mann always took an active 
part in everything that related to the best in- 
terest of the town. He was elected to the 
General Court in 1837. He was one of the 
early advocates of the temperance cause in 
this locality, and was actively interested in 
the Congregational church, of which he was a 
member. His wife, Rhoda Fisher, whom he 
married May 10, 1820, was born in Medway, 
Mass., June 18, 1798. .She became the 
mother of four children, namely: George 
Rodney, born in Medway, June 30, 1821; 
William Rufus, born in Walpole, October 30, 
1823; Caroline Frances, born in Walpole, 
June 18, 1829; and Sarah ]{lizabeth, who was 
born in Sharon, February 5, 1834, and mar- 
ried William Curtis Mills, November 2, 

1853- 

George R. and William R. Mann continued 
the manufacture of sail duck until the fall of 
1845, when they contracted with Henry Ed- 
wards, of Boston, to manufacture belting duck 
for the foundation of rubber machine belting 



2 68 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



under the Goodyear patent, the firm being 
afterward known as the Boston Belting Com- 
pany; and for them they have for over fifty 
years been engaged exclusively in producing 
that fabric. In 1856 they enlarged their busi- 
ness, and erected a brick factory building on 
a new site. 

On June 6, 1843, George Rodney Mann 
was united in marriage with Laura C. John- 
son, of Sharon. She died in November, 1886. 
They had an adopted daughter, Emma May, 
who was born in 1850, and died in 1888. He 
was always found on the right side in advanc- 
ing the public interest. 

William Rufus Mann has figured quite 
prominently in public affairs. He served as 
a Selectman in 1854, was again elected for the 
years 1872 and 1873, was Town Treasurer in 
1856, and has ably filled other positions of 
public trust. He received his first appoint- 
ment as Justice of the Peace, April 27, 1858. 
Prevented by physical incapacity from taking 
an active part in the defence of the Union, he 
rendered much valuable aid to the sick and 
wounded soldiers in this vicinity during the 
Civil War. He received the appointment of 
United States Enrolling Officer; and he en- 
listed and filled the town's quota of soldiers, 
and visited all the hospitals in Maryland and 
Northern Virginia, procuring furloughs for 
the wounded. His deeds of kindness are still 
fresh in the memory of many citizens. He is 
a member of the New England and the Ded- 
ham Historical Societies and a life member 
of the American Pomological Society, and 
takes an active interest in these organizations, 
as well as in subjects kindred to those with 
which they deal. 

William R. Mann has been three times 
married. On June 7, 1849, he wedded Mary 
Hewins, of Sharon; and she died March 7, 
1878. On July 13, 1881, he was again mar- 
ried to Esther E., widow of Richard Fletcher 
Ladd, late of Boston, the daughter of Christo- 
pher C. Barney; and she died January 10, 
1S92. His present wife, whom he married 
December 5, 1893, was before marriage Julia 
A. Barney, of Fall River, Mass. Mr. Mann 
has two children by his first union: Mary 
Ella, born July 9, 1850; and George Hewins, 
born P"ebruary 28, 1856. Mary Ella is the 



wife of James E. Greensmith, a native of 
Derby, England, and now superintendent of 
the Portland (Me.) Locomotive and Marine 
Engine Works. George Hewins married De- 
cember 5, 1883, Elizabeth Cass Stowell, born 
in Haverhill, Mass., in 1863, and has three 
children; namely, Esther Stowell, Ruth Hew- 
ins, and William Rufus. The Mann broth- 
ers are Republicans in politics. 



RANK CLARK GRANGER, M.D., 
of Randolph, Norfolk County, Mass., 
physician and surgeon, was born in 
Randolph, Vt. , April 8, 1849, a son of Noah 
and Caroline (Clark) Granger. He comes of 
an old New England family, being descended 
from Launcelot Granger, who emigrated from 
England in the first half of the seventeenth 
century, and is known to have been living in 
Ipswich, Mass., in 1648. P'rom Ipswich he 
removed to Newbury; and thence he migrated 
to Suffield, Conn., where the remaining years 
of his life were spent. He died in 1689, leav- 
ing a large family. 

Dr. Granger's great-grandfather. Captain 
John Granger, was an officer in the Revolu- 
tionary army. Having raised a company of 
minute-men at New Braintree, Mass., he was 
chosen Captain, and was in command at Bun- 
ker Hill and during the siege of Boston. 
The Doctor's grandfather, Roger Granger, was 
a farmer. 

Frank Clark Granger, after attending school 
in Randolph, Vt., in his early years, entered 
the Vermont State Normal School at Ran- 
dolph, where he was graduated in 1867. In 
the meanwhile, however, his father having 
met with financial reverses, he was obliged to 
earn the money to meet the expenses of his 
professional training; and at the age of six- 
teen he began to teach, taking charge of a 
school at Tunbridge, Vt. He subsequently 
taught at Cresskill, N.J. After graduating 
from the Normal School, he taught for two 
years and a half in California; and he then 
taught in Belmont, Nev., until 1876. The 
study of medicine he began in 1874, under 
the direction of Dr. S. Grant Moore; and he 
continued it under Dr. L. C. Butler, of Essex, 
Vt. Matriculating at Dartmouth Medical 




L V.MAX K. PUTNEY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



271 



College, in 1876 he there took a course of 
lectures; and he later took a course at the 
medical department of the University of Ver- 
mont. From the latter institution he re- 
ceived the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 
1877. He pursued a post-graduate course in 
the University of the City of New York; and 
during the year 1877 he did special work in 
the Manhattan Eye and Ear Infirmary, under 
Dr. William Oliver Moore, of New York 
City. In 1888 Dr. Granger spent four 
months in post-graduate work in the General 
Hospital at Vienna, Austria, and three 
months more he devoted to travel in Europe. 
In December, 1877, he settled in Randolph; 
and he now has a large and lucrative practice 
in Randolph and the adjoining towns. Dr. 
Granger is a member of the American Medi- 
cal Association, also a fellow of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, and since 1890 has 
been on the Board of Censors. 

On August 13, 1873, he was married to 
Alice M., daughter of Dr. Lucius C. and 
Hannah D. (Page) Butler, of Essex, Vt. The 
following children have blessed their union: 
Frank Butler, Lucius Dwight, and Roger 
Gordon. Dr. Granger is Master of Norfolk 
Union Lodge, A. F. & A. M,, of Randolph; is 
a member of Santucket Chapter, R. A. M., 
of Brockton ; and of Bay State Commandery, 
K. T., of Brockton. He is also a member of 
Norfolk Lodge, No. 119, Knights of Pythias. 
In 1875 he was elected superintendent of pub- 
lic instruction in Nye County, Nevada. He 
has contributed some valuable papers to medi- 
cal literature, notably "Jaborandi as a Galac- 
togogue " (1880), and "Chloroform in Labor" 
(1891). 



fYMAN K. PUTNEY, one of the prom- 
inent residents of Wellesley, was born 
^ in Troy, N. H., in 1835, son of Jo- 
seph M. and Mary (Winch) Putney. 
His grandfather, Jedediah Putney, who was 
born in Putney, England, came to this coun- 
try when about twenty years of age. After 
following the occupation of farmer in Ashfield, 
Mass., and in Troy, N.H., he died in Troy at 
the remarkable age of one hundred and three 
years. His wife, formerly Abigail Knight, 



of Fitzwilliam, N.II., died in 1832. Their 
son, Joseph M., born in Ashfield, who has 
also been a farmer, is now leading a retired 
life in Lancaster, Mass., having already passed 
his ninety-fourth birthday. His wife, Mary, 
who came from Fitzwilliam, and was born in 
1812, is also living. 

Leaving the public schools of Troy when he 
was eleven years old, Lyman K. Putney 
started out in life for himself. He first 
worked on farms in various towns in the in- 
terior of New Hampshire for three years. 
Then he went to Clintonville, now Clinton, 
Mass., with the intention of learning the 
woollen maker's trade; but, finding the work 
very distasteful, he abandoned it at the end of 
the first year. He was ne.xt employed in Bos- 
ton, first in a stable and then in a market. 
After staying in the market for a year and a 
half, he began driving teams in the city for 
another man. Four years later he started in 
the teaming business for himself. In 1854 he 
helped to form the firm of Whipple & Co., 
and became the junior partner. This firm 
still does business under the same name. Lo- 
cated first on Kilby Street, they moved later 
to their present location on Lincoln and High 
Streets, where they have been doing a large 
business for the last twenty-five years, chiefly 
for the shoe and leather trade. Although Mr. 
Putney has not been actively engaged in the 
business since \?>T(i, he retains his interest in 
the firm. In 1873 he purchased a farm, put 
up buildings, and carried on farming for the 
next fourteen years. Then he sold out his 
land, and engaged in the real estate business. 
He has put up some of the public buildings at 
Wellesley Hills, and owns a number of houses 
and blocks in the village. In 1868 he moved 
from Boston to West Newton, and two years 
later to Grantville, now Wellesley Hills. 
Ever since he has lived in Wellesley, Mr. Put- 
ney has taken an active part in the life of the 
town. He served as Town Assessor for two 
years. In 1877 he was elected Selectman of 
the old town of Needham, and served for four 
years in that capacity, being the chairman of 
the board for three of those years. He was 
elected to the General Court from the Ninth 
Norfolk District in 1879, and served on the 
Claims Committee. Made chairman of the 



272 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Board of Selectmen again in 1881, he served 
for five years. During the two following 
years he was Water Commissioner. He was 
again elected to the General Court in 1882, 
and he served on the Committee on Chari- 
table Institutions. He was also on the com- 
mittee appointed to investigate charges made 
against the management of the Tewksbury 
Almshouse by General Butler, who was then 
the Governor of the State. Once more elected 
to the Board of Selectmen in 1887, he served 
for four years, making fourteen years in all 
that he has been on this board. He has also 
been on the committee elected by the town to 
look after public buildings, etc. 

In i860 Mr. Putney joined the Bethesda 
Lodge, No. 30, I. O. O. F., and passed 
through all the chairs. In 1861 he became a 
member of Mount Washington Encampment. 
Nine years later he was made Master Mason 
in the Dalhousie Lodge and a member of the 
R. A- Chapter, both of Newtonville. He 
was a charter member of the Sincerity Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., at Wellesley, and subsequently 
was its first Noble Grand, to become which 
he withdrew from the lodge in Boston. In 
1878 he was made Deputy of the Twenty- 
eighth District of the I. O. O. F.; and in 
1895 he took the degrees in the Natick Com- 
mandery, K. T. In politics Mr. Putney is an 
Independent, although tending toward Repub- 
lican principles. Mr. Putney has been 
abroad three times, in 1895, i8g6, and 1897, 
when he travelled extensively through Europe. 
He was married in 1858 to Abbie A., daugh- 
ter of William Marshall, of Troy, N.H., and 
has had four children. These were: Alice 
M., born in 1859, married, and living in 
Needham ; Henry Marshall, born in 1864, 
now a partner in the teaming business, and in 
charge of it; Herbert W., born in 1868, who 
died in 1879; and Ethel W. , born in 1881, 
now attending the Wellesley High School. 



"h:NRY BEEBEE CARRINGTON, 
lawyer, soldier, author, born at Wal- 
H-y I lingford, Conn., March 2, 1824, 

son of Miles M. and Mary (Beebee) 
Carrington, is a grandson of James Carring- 




ton (partner of Eli Whitney in the manufact- 
ure of rifles for the United States, inspector 
of Harper's Ferry and Springfield arsenals, 
inventor of the coffee-mill) and a great-grand- 
son of Captain Jeremiah Carrington, by whom 
Washington was entertained at Wallingford 
during his trip to New England after the war. 
His grandfather and great-grandfather Beebee 
were graduates of Yale College, and the latter 
served in the French and Canadian War of 
1758-59. His great-grandfather. Captain 
Caleb At water, was president of the Connecti- 
cut Land Company which settled "New Con- 
necticut," known as "the Western Reserve," 
where several towns retain family names given 
at their settlement. 

Early education largely shaped his political 
future. While at Torringford, Conn., 1836, 
at the boarding-school of the Rev. Epaphras 
Goodman and Dr. Erasmus D. Hudson (after- 
ward noted abolitionists), John Brown, of 
Ossawatomie, visiting the school, took 
pledges from the scholars that, when they be- 
came men, they would work for the extinction 
of slavery. Among these were W. W. 
Patton, afterward president of Howard L^niver- 
sity, and Thomas K. Brace, afterward Mayor 
of Hartford. Later, at Farmington, Conn., 
where the escaped slaves of the "Armisted" 
(slaver) were cared for by the United States 
pending the question of their return to 
slavery, the prayer-meeting of the venerable 
Noah Porter was mobbed because he prayed 
that the slaves might remain free. A few 
days later his old teachers, Goodman and 
Hudson, were mobbed at West Hartford dur- 
ing an anti-slavery lecture. The impressions 
thus made were never effaced. Under date of 
March 10, 1886, the poet Whittier thus wrote 
to the subject of this sketch: "In my way, I 
have tried to serve the cause of Liberty and 
Humanity by speech and pen, while others like 
thyself enforced their stern and righteous 
lessons in the dread arbitrament of the battle- 
field. The incident of John Brown's address 
to thee and thy schoolmates is noteworthy. 
One boy, at least, took to heart the lesson, 
and made it the rule of his life." 

While yet a mere boy, the subject of our 
sketch, going from New York to New Haven 
in company with his cousin, Sherlock J. An- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



273 



drews, then member of Congress from Cleve- 
land, during the half-day's sail sat upon the 
knee of Daniel Webster, and listened with in- 
tense interest to his diseussion of the slavery 
question and that of protection to American 
manufactures. The lesson made an earnest 
impression. He graduated at Yale College in 
1845; and, of his classmates, William B. 
Woods (Union), and Richard Taylor, Isaac 
Monroe St. John, James C. Tappan, and 
William Connor (Confederate) also became 
Generals during the Civil War. As optional 
studies during the Junior and Senior years Car- 
rington took drawing, surgery, and French, 
all of which became factors in subsequent en- 
gineering and military life. When the famous 
firemen's riot occurred, his room, No. i South 
College, on Chapel Street, was a point of the 
students' defence. On the 17th of June, 1887, 
during the Soldiers' Monument celebration, 
while awaiting the advance of the military 
column. Generals Sherman and Sheridan left 
the reviewing stand near by, and accompanied 
him to No. i, to witness the theatre of his 
"first skirmish." 

Upon graduating, Carrington, at the request 
of Washington Irving, was selected by Pro- 
fessor B. Silliman, Sr., for the professorship 
of natural science and Greek at the Irving In- 
stitute, Tarrytown, N.Y. There he instituted 
military drill, erected a gymnasium, and for a 
while acted as amanuensis for Mr. Irving in 
work upon his "Life of Washington." He 
also acted as usher at Mr. Irving's reception 
upon his return from Spain, when the widow 
of Alexander Hamilton, James Harper, 
Philip K. Paulding, Hiram Ketchum, Com- 
modore Perry, Commander McKenzie, and 
others were guests. On one occasion, while 
accompanying Mr. Irving to White Plains, 
the latter pointed out Chatterton Hill as the 
spot where the nominal battle of White 
Plains was fought. After a survey of the po- 
sition a map was drawn, which became the 
starting-point for "Battles of the American 
Revolution," completed thirty years later. 
Among the pupils under his instruction were: 
William (afterward Governor and Senator) 
Sprague; Amasa Sprague; Adam C. Badeau 
(afterward of Grant's staff), Hobart C. Her- 
rick (New York Corn Ex-change), Thomas 



and John Uenny, of New York; and others, 
mostly from New York City. 

A course at the Yale Law School followed, 
he at the same time serving as professor of 
mathematics and natural science at Root's 
Collegiate Institute. A daily diary was main- 
tained during his college course, embracing 
current data as to the political and military 
events of Europe; and these were tabulated 
when the revolutions of 1848 occurred. Dr. 
Baird's lectures upon Russia were also copied, 
and utilized when events made Russia a factor 
in the subsequent campaigns. 

November, 1848, Mr. Carrington settled 
at Columbus, Ohio, first as partner of A. F. 
Perry and then for nine years with William 
Dennison, until the latter became Governor of 
Ohio. During the winter of 1849 he partici- 
pated with Henry C. Noble and others in the 
rescue of Frederick Douglass, when his oppo- 
nents tried to drown out with a fire-engine his 
attempted delivery of an anti-slavery lecture 
in the old Ohio State-house. In 1851 he 
visited Henry Clay at Ashland, Ky., in 
furtherance of a purpose formed while in col- 
lege, and secured a copy of the "Memorial to 
Washington," which contains the autographic 
signatures of the members of the United 
States Senate in 1840. His address upon 
Russia, just before the arrival of Kossuth, in 
whose reception he participated, was the last 
delivered in the old State-house, which 
burned that night. In conference with the 
patriot he prepared a detailed map of the 
Hungarian struggle up to and including 
the camp where Georgey surrendered to the 
combined armies of Austria and Russia. 

An' incident occurred in 1852 which made 
permanent friendship with General Scott. On 
his arrival at Columbus, while candidate for 
the Presidency, during the firing of a salute at 
the station a premature discharge killed two 
and blinded a third of the gunners. Sending 
medical aid to their relief, he seated General 
Scott in a carriage, without advising him of 
the accident, introduced him to the people at 
the Neil House, reported for the Wliig Review 
his protest to the assembled Germans against 
the current report that he shot German de- 
serters at Mexico because they were for- 
eigners, and the next morning accompanied 



274 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



him to visit the afflicted families of the vic- 
tims. Besides liberal gifts of money General 
Scott exhibited the most tender sympathy, and 
afterward wrote more than once, inquiring as 
to their welfare. He supplied books from 
time to time for military study, and in 1861 
sent him through the fortifications about 
Washington to make observations likely to be 
useful in his army career. 

In 1854, with J. VV. Andrews, Joseph R. 
Swan, Henry C. Noble, B. F. Martin, Lo- 
renzo English, and others, a plan was devised 
for a State conference as to the condition of 
affairs in Kansas and Nebraska. A State con- 
vention was called for July 13; and Henry S. 
Lane, of Indiana, started a similar movement 
in that State. More than a thousand dele- 
gates attended. A Committee of Resolutions 
from each district included leading men of all 
parties. At noon Mr. Dennison produced a 
Detroit paper suggesting the name "Republi- 
can" for the fusion movement. Mr. Giddings 
opposed this, preferring "Republican Confed- 
eracy. '" No name was adopted, but the fusion 
was so complete that a State ticket was 
elected by more than a hundred thousand ma- 
jority. A permanent committee was ap- 
pointed to correspond with lovers of liberty 
throughout the land, to make the movement 
national; namely, H. B. Carrington, Joseph 
R. Swan, Dr. J. B. Coulter, J. H. Baker, and 
Rufus P. Spaulding. Of the Congressional 
Committee, William Allison alone survives. 
Henry S. Lane telegraphed from Indianapolis, 
"The Indianapolis Convention repudiates the 
Nebraska swindle, and has organized for a vic- 
torious conflict." Lane and Dennison were 
president and vice-president of the Philadel- 
phia Convention, which first introduced the 
Republican party to national suffrage. 

During this period Mr. Carrington was an 
Elder of the Second Presbyterian Church, and 
for a time was superintendent of its Sunday- 
school. He organized the first Y. M. C. 
Association of Central Ohio, secured the sub- 
scription and superintended the building of 
the stone church still used by the society, and 
was also a trustee of Marietta College. 

When Mr. Chase became Governor, he was 
charged with the organization of a uniformed 
State militia, and State encampments were 



instituted. His annual report for 1859 
showed thirty companies at one encampment, 
and sudden calls were made to test their dis- 
cipline. The First Regiment (Colonel Ed. 
A. King, afterward killed at Chickamauga, as 
Lieutenant Colonel, Nineteenth United States 
Infantry) rallied seven companies at night in 
thirty minutes. On a dark and stormy night 
the Columbus battalion reported more than 
half its strength in twenty-seven minutes. 
Major-generals Walcott, Mitchell, and Jones 
were from these companies. Such was the 
trend and character of the Ohio militia as war 
drew near. 

Until war began, he was attorney of all rail- 
roads in Central Ohio, and two cases reported 
in Sixth Ohio Reports (New Series) became 
authority. He was appointed by Justice Mc- 
Lain, upon recommendation of the Ohio bar, 
Special Commissioner to dispose of certain 
admiralty cases during the illness of District 
Judge Leavitt, and was counsel with Thomas 
Corwin in the case of Driscoll v. Parish, 
where the alleged participancy of the defend- 
ant in the rescue of a fugitive slave gave im- 
portance to the issue. He accompanied Mr. 
Chase in his election canvass, alternating the 
opening address at various county seats; ac- 
companied him to the opening of the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad, and spoke at the Mary- 
land Institute in honor of the event; and, 
under the Governor's direction, negotiated 
with President Buchanan and his cabinet a 
plan, carried into effect, for the joint dismissal 
by Federal and State Courts of conflicting 
processes in the Greene County fugitive slave 
case. In the subsequent Langston case he 
placed the militia under arms to support the 
Supreme Court and prevent the rearrest of 
the defendant in case the court, under writ of 
habeas corpus^ should order a discharge. 

As Adjutant-general he escorted the Prince 
of Wales from Cincinnati to Columbus, the 
legislatures of Kentucky and Tennessee as 
well, and took part in the escort of President- 
elect Lincoln from Illinois to Columbus. A 
volume of military regulations and tactics, 
published in 1859, was revised the following 
year; nearly twenty bronze guns were rifled; 
and, as the result of a State convention of 
officers, new laws were enacted to make the 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



275 



organization more complete. Trips to New 
York and Massachusetts encampments and to 
Generals Scott and Wool were annual. The 
Adjutant-general of New York, Frederick K. 
Townsend, afterward became a Major in the 
Eighteenth United States Infantry; and Will- 
iam Schouler, Adjutant-general of Massachu- 
setts, had been for a time Adjutant-general of 
Ohio while Carrington was Judge Advocate- 
general of the State. 

When his partner Dennison became Gov- 
ernor, new impetus was given to the militia. 
The dedication of the Perry monument at 
Cleveland brought the force again together. 
Wood's (afterward Barnett's) battery had al- 
ready been inspected by General Scott and 
pronounced "excellent." The sham battle on 
the lake was arranged to correspond as nearly 
as possible with the rig, tonnage, and arma- 
ment of vessels engaged in the battle of Lake 
Erie; and the survivors of Perry's men, with 
the Marine Artillery and Providence Light In- 
fantry, formed the escort of Governor Sprague 
from Rhode Island. 

In January, 1861, Senator Chase wrote: 
"Our most sober thinkers and those best in- 
formed, as well as conservative men from the 
South, predict war. Our militia should be 
officered by the wisest and best men. How 
soon they may be needed, no man can tell." 
Secretary Cass also wrote, "We have, indeed, 
fallen upon evil times, when those who should 
preserve seem bent upon destroying our 
country." 

On the nth of April the Adjutant-general 
delivered an address, entitled "The Hour, the 
Peril, and the Duty," predicting the war and 
its result. At the request of Senators Gar- 
field, Cox, and others, it was repeated twice; 
and Fort Sumter fell before the last delivery. 
The call for seventy-five thousand men fol- 
lowed. Two regiments were despatched for 
Washington within si.xty hours. Si.xty Sena- 
tors and members were uniformed as a com- 
pany, and drilled under the State-house 
dome. Garfield, being tallest, was assigned to 
the right, and made acting First Sergeant. 
Upon his demanding why the "left" and not 
the "right" foot was uniformly advanced, the 
Adjutant-general gave him a musket, with the 
order, " Charge Bayonet ! " The Sergeant ac- 



cepted the lesson amid the merriment of his 
associates. Senators Co.x and Sleigh, repre- 
senting the two parties, were selected for 
vacant militia brigadierships, to make them 
eligible for appointment in the three months' 
service; and, upon suspension of the rules 
before midnight, a bill was passed authoriz- 
ing the Governor to appoint a Major-general 
from citizens at large, and the commission 
of McClellan was made out and delivered to 
him. 

A plan of campaign in the contingency of 
war had been submitted to General Wool and 
approved by him. A foundry was opened on 
the Sabbath, and solid shot cast for Barnett's 
battery, which had been ordered to Columbus. 
The State militia were placed in various fair 
grounds for quick concentration. General 
Wool supplied ten thousand stand of arms; 
and the militia were ready for service before 
a regiment of volunteers, other than those sent 
East, had been mustered into the United 
States service. 

A despatch from Senator Carlisle, of West 
Virginia, reported that hostile forces would be 
upon the Ohio border, if not anticipated by 
the immediate presence of troops. Doubtful 
of his right to pass militia beyond the State 
line. Governor Dennison authorized the Ad- 
jutant-general to report to General McClellan, 
and execute any orders he deemed necessary 
at such a juncture. The result was tele- 
graphic orders given on the train at various 
stations, so that the eight regiments of militia 
were put in motion within eight hours. A 
section of Barnett's battery and Steadman's 
regiment crossed to Parkersburg, and occupied 
the heights at midnight, just in time to cut off 
the Confederate advance. Bridges were re- 
built, and the whole line restored as far as 
Grafton. The battle of Philippi was fought, 
Barnett's battery firing the first shot of the war 
in the West. Confederates occupied Huttons- 
ville Pass with one small iron gun: and Colo- 
nel Steadman, Colonel Milroy, of Indiana, 
and Barnett favored the proposition of the 
Adjutant-general to advance, without transpor- 
tation except ambulances, receipt for sup- 
plies, and live on the country. This was 
overruled by General Morris, in command at 
Grafton, and Colonel Kelly, of the W^est Vir- 



276 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ginia regiment, who was too seriously 
wounded to join his command. But Grafton 
and its communications with the Ohio were 
never afterward disturbed. 

The thanks of the President and the Secre- 
tary of War were followed, upon the request 
of Generals Scott and Wool, seconded by Sec- 
retary Chase, by the appointment (unsolicited) 
of the Adjutant-general as Colonel of the 
Eighteenth United States Infantry. This was 
the only three-battalion regiment filled to its 
maximum during the war. It took to the field 
two thousand, four hundred and forty-three 
officers and men, containing during the war 
four thousand, seven hundred and seventy- 
three men, of whom three thousand, one hun- 
dred and ninety were American by birth, and 
two thousand forty-nine, citizens of Ohio. 
By permission of the Secretary of War the 
Adjutant-general, while commanding the reg- 
ular army rendezvous at Camp Thomas, near 
Columbus, was permitted to continue duty for 
the State until July i, 1861. He therefore 
signed the commissions of McClellan, Cox, 
Garfield, Rosecrans, Sill, Hayes, Matthews, 
Steadman, Beatty, and others afterward dis- 
tinguished in the war. One detachment of 
colored volunteers for Massachusetts received 
from him a set of silk colors before their de- 
parture. No other Western State presented a 
militia organization which had been drilled 
in both battalion and brigade movements. 

During November, 1861, he reported with 
his command to General Thomas at Lebanon, 
Ky. , leaving a battalion of the Sixteenth 
United States Infantry at Louisville, after 
suppressing, at the request of General Buell, a 
mutiny of volunteers claiming a furlough of 
, thirty days after enlistment. The Ninth and 
Thirty-fifth Ohio and the Second Minnesota 
were added to the Eighteenth to complete the 
brigade; but peremptory orders from Washing- 
ton detached the commander to first complete 
the enlistments at the Regular Army Camp of 
Instruction at Camp Thomas. The result was 
the separation of the regiment from its im- 
mediate commander. 

In June, 1862, he published an appeal to 
the people of Ohio, urging the formation on 
Saturday afternoons of a reserve force of one 
hundred thousand men, closing the appeal 



with the words, "for this is a war of the 
people, by the people, and for the people." 
He was unexpectedly called to Washington. 
A conference of several Cabinet officers had 
been called at the suggestion of Secretary 
Chase, who threatened to surrender the Treas- 
ury portfolio unless General McClellan were 
removed from command ; and Colonel Carring- 
ton was named as the officer to bear despatches 
to that effect. Secretary Seward suggested 
that the relations of that officer with General 
McClellan had been such as to make such a 
duty very unpleasant, especially as General 
McClellan had desired the Eighteenth In- 
fantry to be sent East to join his command. 
Secretary Welles and William Cullen Bryant, 
who had been invited to the interview, con- 
curred. Despatches had been received stat- 
ing that Generals Halleck and Pope would 
arrive during the night from the VVest ; and 
Colonel Carrington was instructed to meet 
those officers upon their arrival, with requests 
that they would not report at the War Depart- 
ment, but be ready at ten o'clock the follow- 
ing morning to visit the President at the Sol- 
diers' Home. General Pope was met at mid- 
night, and General Halleck at daylight. The 
latter was unknown to Colonel Carrington, 
and insisted that the cap ornament "18" was 
of Ohio, that he was absent without leave, and 
not an officer of the regular army. The com- 
munication was delivered, however; and at ten 
o'clock the officers of the Cabinet mentioned 
alighted at Willard's, and were introduced. 
Halleck accepted the fact, but did not until 
after the war forgive the incident. 

The question with President Lincoln was 
simply "whether different operations in Ken- 
tucky, Missouri, and Tennessee were acci- 
dentally harmonious or the result of forecast 
which included all zones of operation in one 
systematic conduct of the war." These offi- 
cers were at once placed in their respective 
commands, and Colonel Carrington returned 
to Camp Thomas. 

The Kirby Smith campaign opened. L^pon 
urgent appeal of Governor Morton, the Adju- 
tant-general ordered Colonel Carrington to re- 
port at once to Indiana and take charge of 
organizing and equipping its forces for the 
field. Eleven regiments were forwarded in as 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



277 



many days, including muster, arming, and 
payment of bounty; and eventually this officer 
sent into the service nearly one hundreil thou- 
sand men from that State alone. A battalion 
of officers was organized. The return ol 
paroled men and new regiments soon placed 
under drill four brigades, with batteries daily 
instructed in target practice, and cavalry in 
sword exercise. The entire force was in- 
spected by Inspector-general Van Rensselaer, 
and was claimed by General McClerland to be 
organized for a separate command for himself. 
It was known that such had been President 
Lincoln's design — his "castor-oil expedition 
to open the Mississippi," as he called it. On 
the 30th of November the commanding officers 
of the regiments and batteries sent a request 
to General Halleck that the force take the 
field under its temporary commander. Grad- 
ually the regiments were sent to various 
points requiring troops, and McClerland's 
corps ceased to exist. Meanwhile and fol- 
lowing the draft of 1862, which was resisted 
in parts of Indiana, the disloyal Order of the 
Knights of the Golden Circle, and then that 
of the Sons of Liberty, became more pro- 
nounced in its revolutionary plans. The as- 
signment of Colonel Carrington to command 
the regular brigade shortly before the battle of 
Stone River, when Rosecrans called for all his 
force, brought such a protest from Governor 
Morton that finally that brigade went into 
action under Lieutenant Colonel Shepherd of 
the Eighteenth Infantry. The year closed 
with troops on duty near the State-house, re- 
sisting processes of the State Supreme Court, 
which were nearly as revolutionary and trea- 
sonable as the plans of the more openly dis- 
loyal. One judge in Illinois, who instructed 
a grand jury to find indictments for kidnap- 
ping against officers and soldiers arresting de- 
serters, was removed from the court-house, 
and his court adjourned sine die. The legis- 
lature passed an act, removing from the Gov- 
ernor control of the militia, substituting 
officers of the State to issue commissions 
and control the militia. The ■ Governor was 
called upon to surrender to their control the 
public arms. The following paper was ex- 
ecuted by. him at midnight, and solved the 
dilemma: ^- 



EXECUTIVK Department, January 30, 1863. 

All arms and equipments helonj^ing to the United 
States in the arsenal of this city are hereby turned over 
to your posse.ssion and control. 

Yours respectfully, 

O. P. Morton. 
Cor.oNKL Cakki.xgto.n. 



After promotion, as Brigadier-general, Car- 
rington commanded the district, conducted its 
recruiting service as well as the border de- 
fence, and at one time armed eighteen thou- 
sand of the militia to supply the need of 
troops along the Ohio River. When Bragg 
threatened Louisville, and all public stores 
were removed to the north shore, the fortifica- 
tion of the banks became a necessity, as the 
stage of water exposed fording-places below 
the falls. The domestic treason became so 
marked that over one hundred were convicted 
by juries in the Federal Court. One deserter 
and three bounty jumpers were sent in irons 
to General Sherman for work in trenches. 
Attempts to release Confederate prisoners in 
Camps Morton, Douglass, and Chase became 
so serious that a howitzer battery was sent by 
General Rosecrans from St. Louis, and the 
Sixtieth Massachusetts was sent to increase 
the guard, which had been depleted for ser- 
vice at the South. Provost Marshal Richard 
W. Thompson, of Terre Haute, reported a 
deposit of the rituals of the traitors at an 
office in that city, and upon seizure sent the 
entire material to headquarters. A full ex- 
posure was made to the government. 

Detached for a short time to organize one- 
hundred-day men at Cleveland by request of 
Governor Todd, General Carrington was 
ordered back to Indiana during the Morgan 
raid, and afterward joined his regiment in the 
Army of the Cumberland. The thanks of the 
State and a special testimonial from the city of 
Indianapolis attended his departure. The fol- 
lowing is an extract from a letter of Major- 
general Heintzelman to General Halleck: 
"To his [General Carrington's] energy, per- 
severance, and good judgment I am indebted 
for all the information I have been able to 
submit. To the information thus obtained 
and the measures taken in consequence 
thereof, we are indebted mainly for being 



>78 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



saved the horrors of civil war in this sec- 
tion." 

While General Carrington's headquarters 
were at Louisville, he received the thanks of 
Governor Bramblett and General Burbridge for 
services in raising the siege of Frankfort; 
and he was president of the commission to 
try guerilla chiefs leaving for the frontier in 
the fall of 1865. During the fall and winter 
he commanded the East District of Nebraska, 
organized a Pawnee battalion under Major 
North, and operated along the line of the Re- 
publican. In the spring of 1866 he was 
visited by General Sherman at Fort Kearney, 
and the expedition to open a wagon road 
around the Big Horn Mountains to Montana 
was projected. So confident was General 
Sherman that the Laramie conference with 
Indians, designated for May, would ensure 
peace, that families of officers were induced 
to accompany the command. Upon reaching 
Laramie the Indian conference was in ses- 
sion, but peremptory orders obliged the troops 
to proceed without waiting for final action. 
The treaty was a failure. Members of the 
conference received presents, and immedi- 
ately began war upon the new line. Daily 
conflicts occurred. Forts were built, but 
only protected their immediate vicinity. Re- 
enforcements, called for and promised, were 
withheld. The fight of December 6 and the 
Fetterman disaster of December 21 left the 
small garrisons with ammunition varying from 
ten to forty-five rounds per man. A special 
commission visited the country, and their 
official report uses this caustic language: 
"The difficulty is, in a nutshell, that the com- 
manding officer of the district was furnished 
no more troops or supplies for this state of 
war than had been provided and furnished for 
a state of profound peace. In regions where 
all was peace, as at Laramie in November, 
twelve companies were stationed; while in 
regions where all was war, as at Fort Kearney, 
there were only five companies allowed." For 
want of timely re-enforcements to retain the 
country occupied, the forts were dismantled 
or burned ; and the whole line was abandoned 
for a season by order of General Grant. It 
was not until more than two years later, and 
after the then senior colonel of the army 



had been retired from active service for a 
wound received in line of duty, that his 
official report as District Commander, re- 
ceived early in 1867 at Washington, was 
permitted to be published. 

During 1867 he conducted conferences 
while at Fort McPherson with Chiefs Pawnee 
Killer, Dull Knife, Spotted Tail, and others, 
and in 1868-69 commanded Fort Sedgwick, 
Colorado. His wound disabled him from 
mounted service; and in December he was as- 
signed as military professor of Wabash Col- 
lege, Indiana. Upon increase of disability 
that threatened to prove fatal, he was retired 
the following year. While on this detail he 
erected the large gymnasium, now the Hovey 
Museum, raising most of the funds by per- 
sonal solicitation in Indiana; built the city 
hall and other structures; assisted at the test 
of the St. Louis Bridge at request of Captain 
Eads; and made an examination of the Ash- 
tabula Bridge after that disaster, which vindi- 
cated its designer, Amasa Stone, Jr., from 
responsibility for alleged defects of design 
and construction. 

Meanwhile, in lectures and study. General 
Carrington completed the text and many of the 
maps for his "Battles of the American Revolu- 
tion," and then, under the auspices of the 
British and American governments, visited 
Europe to perfect his work. He was placed 
on assimilated rank with British officers, re- 
ceived the courtesies of the Athenaeum, Army 
and Navy Club (senior and junior). United 
Service Club (senior and junior), Huntington 
Fine Arts Club, The Reform Club, and 
others, as well as the Royal Geographical So- 
ciety, in whose rooms he prepared a large 
map, now held by the society, for illustration 
of a lecture, before the British Association, 
upon the American Indians of the North-west. 
He was a member of several standing commit- 
tees of the British Association, and at Ox- 
ford, Dublin, Belfast, Glasgow, and Edinburgh 
Universities was alike welcomed. At the 
casting of the first eighty-one ton gun at Wool- 
wich he was the only foreigner present except 
the Duke of Braganza; and at its final test 
he was called from Paris by 'General Camp- 
bell, Director-general of Artillery, to witness 
the same, being the only foreigner present. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RF.VIKAV 



279 



Each member of Lord Beaconsfield's Cabinet 
contributed aid in liis researclies; and, as a 
member of the United States Supreme Court 
bar, he was present when the Lord Chancellor 
announced the end, sine die, of the High Court 
of Lnglish Chancery. Courtesies extended to 
Major Bridges, of the First Regiment, Queen's 
Guards, and William Blackmore, of Parlia- 
ment, while they were on the frontier in 1868, 
were more than reciprocated by British army 
circles during his visit. 

In Paris, Minister Washburne and Secretary 
Hitt secured opportunities for research; and 
ex-President and Madame Thiers, as well as 
Count Rochambeau and Senators Oscar and 
Edmund Lafayette, largely contributed to his 
success. Each of these officials and each 
member of the British Cabinet took occasion, 
upon completion of the volume, to recognize 
its impartiality of research and record. Colo- 
nel Hamley, of the Queen's Staff College, and 
Colonel C. C. Chesney, of the Royal En- 
gineers, especially indorsed its treatment of 
the art of war in the introduction. Sir Jo- 
seph Hooker, president of the Royal Society, 
wrote, "I was never able before to understand 
the full character of Washington; and I have 
read the volume most carefully, with ever-in- 
creasing delight and profit." Of the Ameri- 
can proof-readers of the manuscript, George 
Bancroft, Benson J. Lossing, and President 
Woolsey were equally cordial in its indorse- 
ment. 

Besides being a life member of the Ameri- 
can Historical Society, General Carrington 
was made corresponding member of the Massa- 
chusetts, Virginia, and other State Historical 
Societies, and received the degree of Doctor 
of Laws from Wabash College in 1870. His 
literary works, besides more than a hundred 
addresses before historical and educational so- 
cieties and conventions at home and abroad, 
include the following: "The Scourge of the 
Alps" (a serial, 1847); "American Classics" 
(1849); "Russia among the Nations" (1851); 
"Military Regulations and Tactics" (1859); 
"Crisis Thoughts" (1861); "Hints to Sol- 
diers taking the Field" (1862), of which the 
United States Sanitary and Christian Commis- 
sions distributed more than one hundred thou- 
sand; "Absaroka, Land of Massacre" 



(1868), enlarged as "Wyoming Opened" 
(1886) ; "Battles of the American Revolu- 
tion" (1876), in its sixth thousand, as revised 
with the aid of the late Robert C. Winthrop; 
"The Indian Question" (1884); "Ocean to 
Ocean" (1886); "Washington Obelisk and 
its Voices" (1886); "Boston and New York 
in the Revolution " (1889) ; "Human Liberty 
Developed," (a patriotic reader, 1888); "Co- 
lumbian Selections" (1893); "The Six Na- 
tions of New York" and the "Cherokees of 
North Carolina" (1892), published by the 
government; "Beacon Lights of Patriotism" 
(1895); and the editing of "Poems of Home 
and Country" (by the Rev. S. Y. Smith, 
author of the hymn "America"). General 
Carrington was corresponding secretary of the 
Boston committee having in charge the testi- 
monial to Dr. Smith at Music Hall, Boston, 
April 3, 1895. 

"The Battles of the Bible " and " Pre-Chris- 
tian Assurances of Christianity" were in prep- 
aration, when the sheets were destroyed by a 
fire which also destroyed many hundreds of 
photo negatives of Indians taken in person. 
"The Rent Veil and Other Poems" is ready 
for the printer. "The Rose of the Guadal- 
quivir," the data of which Mr. Irving left in- 
complete, is in process of development. 

General Carrington removed to Boston in 
1882 and to Hyde Park in 1885. In 1889 he 
was detailed to make treaties with the Flat- 
head Indians of Montana. In i8go he made 
the Indian census of the Six Nations of New 
York, and in i8gi, personally conducted the 
removal of the Flathead Indians from Bitter 
Root valley to their new reservation in North- 
western Montana. In 1896 he became mem- 
ber of the Sewer Board of Commissioners 
of Hyde Park, otherwise avoiding civil 
office. 

He first married at Columbus, Ohio, in 
1851, Margaret McDowell, eldest daughter of 
Joseph Sullivant, a noted scientist and scholar. 
Their eldest son, Henry Sullivant, graduated 
at Wabash College, 1879, had two years of 
service in the South Seas, and died in 1894, 
while in the service of the Illinois Central 
Railroad Company, leaving one son, Henry 
B. Carrington, Jr. Of six children by this 
wife, the only survivor is Jarnes Beebee Car- 



28o 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



rington, of the editorial staff of Sctibner's 
Magazine, whose versatile literary work in 
that duty has given him a well-deserved posi- 
tion among scholars. 

On the 3d of April, 1870, General Carring- 
ton married Frances Courtney (widow of Lieu- 
tenant G. VV. Grummond, Colonel of a Michi- 
gan regiment during the Civil War). He was 
killed in battle with Indians, December 21, 
1 866. She was the youngest daughter of 
Robert and Eliza J. (Haynes) Courtney, of 
Franklin, Tenn., Virginians of noted loyalty 
to the Union even while surrounded by those 
opposed to the prosecution of the war. This 
family, after the battle of Franklin, took per- 
sonal charge of the Federal wounded left on 
the field, and nursed them in a church until 
Federal troops, after the battle of Nashville, 
again occupied Franklin. General Thomas 
and other Federal officials ofificially recognized 
this service; and the history of the experience 
of Mrs. Carrington (then Miss Courtneyj was 
published by the United States Sanitary Com- 
mission as one of the striking episodes of the 
war. One son by her former husband, Will- 
iam Wands, adopted by General Carrington, 
died of consumption at Hyde Park, January 
19, 1897. Their son, Robert Chase Carring- 
ton, born January 28, 1872, was for two years 
associated with the mercantile house of Buck 
& Co., in Montana, and later book-keeper of 
Bleakie & Co., woollen manufacturers at 
Hyde Park, until he went to North Carolina 
in the fall of 1896, to restore impaired health. 
Two daughters are: Henrietta, born April 28, 
1874; and Eliza Jane, born April 27, 1875. 
Mrs. Carrington's sister, Mrs. Florence O. 
Cochnower, who participated in the care of 
Federal wounded soldiers during the war, is 
in the public service at Washington, and is in 
receipt of a pension for services rendered. 




AMUEL W. THORNDIKE, who 
was for many years a prominent 
business man of Boston and during 
the latter part of his life a resident 
of Braintree, Mass., was born in Boston, 
Mass., February 23, 1836, a son of James P. 
and Martha E. (Hodgdon) Thorndike. His 
father, James P. Thorndike, a native of War- 



ner, N.H., was one of the leading wholesale 
leather merchants in Boston, in which city he 
took lip his permanent residence in 1835, hav- 
ing previously been engaged in the tanning 
business in Salem. About 1856 he began 
spending his summers in Braintree, and con- 
tinued to do so for the rest of his life, which 
closed in October, 1878. His wife, Martha, 
was a native of Salem, Mass. 

Samuel W. Thorndike was reared to man- 
hood in Boston, receiving his education in the 
public schools and in the institution now 
known as the Chauncy Hall School of that 
city. He then became a clerk in his father's 
office in Boston, in which position he contin- 
ued for a number of years. He subsequently 
entered into a partnership with his elder 
brother in the wholesale leather business, 
under the style of James D. Thorndike & Co., 
the firm e.xisting until the great Boston fire of 
1872, when it dissolved. After some years 
more of business life devoted to railroad in- 
terests, Mr. Thorndike, owing- to ill health, 
retired, and passed his days as a private citi- 
zen of Braintree until his demise on May 20, 
1896. He was a Democrat in politics; and, 
though not an active politician, he took a 
lively interest in town affairs. He served 
some time as Justice of the Peace. His relig- 
ious opinions led him to attend and support 
the Congregational church, but he was also a 
generous contributor to other religious bodies 
and various charitable institutions. Mr. 
Thorndike was a representative citizen in the 
sense that he combined the best and most 
prominent elements of New England charac- 
ter — -tenacity of purpose, devotion to prin- 
ciple, and indomitable perseverance in what- 
ever he undertook. Commanding the respect 
which accompanies success in any legitimate 
walk in life, he was also esteemed for his per- 
sonal qualities, which realized a lofty ideal of 
manhood; and his death was the cause of 
wide-spread sorrow. 

Mr. Thorndike married Elizabeth J. Hay- 
den, daughter of Charles D. and Rebecca T. 
(Arnold) Hayden, and a member of an old 
Braintree family, her paternal grandfather, 
Robert Hayden, having been many years a resi- 
dent of this town. One of Mrs. Thorndike's 
ancestors, Nehemiah Hayden, fought for 




HENRY T. MANSFIELD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



nS3 



American independence in the Revolutionary 
War. Mr. and Mrs. Thorndike were the par- 
ents of one son, Alden A., who now resides, 
with his own family and his widowed mother, 
at the beautiful homestead in Rraintree. 




ENRY TUCKER MANSFIELD, 
M.D., a successful medical practi- 
ce) I tioner of Needham, was born in 
Boston, February 2, 1838, son of 
John T. and E. Adeline (Story) Mansfield. 
As Dr. Mansfield is descended on the paternal 
side from the Dudleys and Tuckers, and on 
the maternal side from the Storys, on his fam- 
ily tree may be found some of the most dis- 
tinguished names of the old Bay State. His 
paternal grandfather, Daniel Hopkins Mans- 
field, son of Matthew Mansfield, was a prosper- 
ous merchant of Salem interested in the ocean 
carrying trade; and his grandmother Mans- 
field was a direct descendant of Governor 
Dudley of Massachusetts, whose daughter, 
Anne, married Governor Bradstreet. 

John T. Mansfield, above named, was born 
in Salem in 1799, and was a prominent mer- 
chant and business man of that town. He 
was for eleven years United States Consul at 
Pernambuco, Brazil, South America, and 
filled the ofifice with eminent credit. He died 
in 1839. His wife, E. Adeline, was the 
youngest, daughter of Dr. Elisha Story, of 
Marblehead, and sister to the late Hon. Jo- 
seph Story, Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. Dr, Story was 
one of the members of the Boston Tea Party 
of 1773, and Dr. Mansfield has now in his 
I)ossession a very ancient and interesting doc- 
ument describing that historical event. 

In 1862 Henry T. Mansfield, who had been 
educated in the public schools of Salem, 
Mass., received a commission as assistant 
paymaster of the United States Navy. He 
was stationed off Charleston Harbor, S.C. , 
and was present at the fall of Charleston. 
He resigned in 1865, at the close of the war, 
and returning to Boston began the study of 
medicine at the medical department of Har- 
vard University; and, graduating in 1869 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, he 
commenced the practice of his profession in 



Boston. He removed to Dedham in 1873, 
and practised there for one year, being during 
that time both town and county physician. 
In July, 1874, he came to Needham, and has 
since resided in this town, where he has made 
many warm personal friends, and has built up 
a successful and lucrative practice. For ten 
years he has been town physician of Needham, 
and he has served as chairman of the Board of 
Health. 

Dr. Mansfield is a member of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, of the American Medi- 
cal Society, and of the Harvard Medical 
Alumni; is a comrade of Galen Orr Post, 
G. A. R., of Needham; is connected with the 
military order. Loyal Legion of the United 
States; Oriental Lodge, No. 10, I. O. O. F., 
of Boston; and the Veteran Odd P'ellows 
Association. He is a thirty-second degree 
Mason, being a member of Revere Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., in Boston; of Newton Chapter, 
R. A. M. ; Gethsemane Commandery, K. T., 
of Newtonville; and of De Witt Clinton Con- 
sistory. Dr. Mansfield has been a Justice of 
the Peace of the State of Massachusetts for 
nearly twelve years. He is a member of the 
First Parish Church. 



(TTRVING VV. HORNE, the popular and 
hI efficient Superintendent of Schools in 
J_|_ Braintree, was born in Berlin, N.H., 
July 10, 1859, son of John R. and Sarah 
(Wheeler) Home, both natives of the State of 
New Hampshire. John R. Home, a native of 
New Hampshire, is an extensive land-owner 
in Berlin, and is said to own the largest farm 
in Coos Count)'. He has been a successful 
agriculturist and prominent in local politics. 
He served for nine years as chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen of Berlin, was Town Col- 
lector for seven years, and he represented the 
place in the legislature for two terms. 

The early education of Superintendent 
Home was obtained in the schools of Berlin 
and at the Bridgton Academy of North Bridg- 
ton. Me. After graduating from the latter 
institution in 1882, he entered Bowdoin Col- 
lege. Graduating from Bowdoin four years 
later, he began his career as teacher, having 
already gained some experience at different 



284 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



times during his under-graduate days. His 
first position after leaving college was that of 
principal of the high school at Topsham, Me. 
This he subsequently left to become principal 
of the Gorham High School. He held the 
same position in the Southboro (Massachu- 
setts) High School for two years and at East 
Providence for one year; and for the same 
length of time he was assistant principal of 
the Chelsea High School. He next accepted 
the charge of the Ouincy High School, and in 
1892 he was appointed Superintendent of the 
Schools of Braintree. 

Mr. Home is a member of the Congre- 
gational church at Braintree. He married 
Miss E. J. Pulsifer, of Sumner, Me., and 
has one son, named Alton Irving. He is 
identified by membership with the Knights of 
Pythias, the F. & A. M., and the I. O. O. F. 




"ON. HENRY B. TERRY, a leading 
lawyer, the Town Clerk and Trial 
Justice of Hyde Park, was born at 
Raynham, Mass., April 21, 1845, 
son of John and Miriam S. (Bradbury) Terry. 
The first ancestor of the family in this country 
was Thomas Terry, who, with a company of 
other settlers, purchased Block Island in 1662. 
He later removed to Freetown, of which he 
was Selectman and for many years the Repre- 
sentative to the General Court. He was also 
Lieutenant of the Freetown Militia Company, 
and was known as Lieutenant Jerry. Zeph- 
eniah, great-grandfather of Judge Terry, was a 
farmer, and spent most of his life in Free- 
town, where he was prominent and respected. 
His son John, who was a ship-master and a 
farmer, died in Newtown, N.Y. , at the age of 
fifty-nine years. John married Clarissa Dean, 
of Raynham, one of the five children of Job 
Dean, a farmer of that town. She was born 
in a house now over two hundred years old. 
Of her eight children, three are living, 
namely: James, residing in New York; Eliz- 
abeth, the widow of Henry Southworth ; and 
John (second), Jiving in Hyde Park. Claris.sa 
Terry died at the age of sixty-four. She was 
a Congregational ist in religious faith, as was 
her husband. 

John Terry, the father of Judge Terry, 



began life on the home farm, and remained 
there until nineteen years of age, receiving 
his education in the public schools. When 
nineteen he took employment on a coasting- 
vessel. After following the sea for the next 
four years, he settled down on the shore, and 
learned the foundry business. He worked ten 
years as a journeyman, spending the latter 
half of that period in Raynham. He opened a 
foundry in Raynham, which he operated for 
two years. Then he built a foundry in Mans- 
field, and conducted that for three years, 
after which he sold it to Gardiner Chilson, 
and was his superintendent until 1866. In 
this year he came to Hyde Park, where he has 
since resided. Here he has been interested in 
all local affairs, and has taken an active part 
in the public life of the town. He has been 
Overseer of the Poor for fifteen years and on 
the Board of Health for two years. He has 
also been interested quite largely in real es- 
tate investments, building a number of houses, 
and beginning the village of Sunnyside. His 
wife, Miriam, to whom he was married on No- 
vember 5, 1843, was a daughter of Samuel 
Bradbury, of York, Me. Mr. Bradbury was a 
carpenter and builder, and was born and spent 
the greater part of his life in York. Mrs. 
Miriam S. Terry died March 27, 1890, having 
had one child, Henry B. Both parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and the father has been a trustee and steward 
of the society for many years. He is a Re- 
publican in politics. 

Henry B. Terry sf)ent the early years of his 
life at home, receiving his elementary instruc- 
tion in private schools. Among these was the 
well-known academy at East Greenwich, R.I., 
a Methodist fitting school, where he was a 
student in May, 1862, when he enlisted in 
Company F of the Ninth Rhode Island Regi- 
ment as a private. After three months he 
was discharged; and in the spring of 1863 he 
returned to East Greenwich, and completed 
his course. He then entered Wesleyan Uni- 
versity at Middletown, Conn. Having grad- 
uated in 1867, he then entered upon a course 
of reading in preparation for the legal pro- 
fession with Charles W. Turner, Esq., of Bos- 
ton. In 1 87 1 he was admitted to the bar. 
Thereupon he settled in Hyde Park, where 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



285 



he has since been in active practice. In 1870 
he was first elected Town Clerk, which office 
he has held since, a period of twenty-six 
years. In 1871 he was appointed Trial Jus- 
tice, a capacity in which he has since effi- 
ciently served, being now among the oldest 
trial justices in this county and among the 
oldest lawyers in the town. In his private 
practice he makes a specialty of settling es- 
tates, and has done a large amount of business 
in that line. Like his father, he is a loyal 
Republican, and has always taken an active 
interest in town affairs. 

In 1872 Judge Terry married Abbie A., 
daughter of Jacob and Abigail (Bird) VVether- 
ell, of Newton. Mr. Wetherell, who was 
superintendent for nineteen years with the 
firm of Grover & Baker, manufacturers of sew- 
ing machines, and saw the business grow from 
a factory employing fifty men to one employ- 
ing five hundred, died in 1874. Mrs. Wether- 
ell was one of a large family. Of her si.x 
children, three are living — Mrs. George 
Pettee, Mrs. Terry, and Frank J. She was 
connected with the Baptist denomination, and 
was an active worker in the church. At her 
death she was seventy-one years old. Judge 
Terry and his wife have one child, Sarah 
Miriam. The Judge is a comrade of Timothy 
Ingraham Post, No. 121, G. A. R., and has 
membership in several Masonic bodies, in- 
cluding the Norfolk Royal Arch Chapter, 
Hyde Park Council, and Cyprus Commandery. 
He is a director of the Real Estate and Build- 
ing Company, the oldest in this section. 
Both he and Mrs. Terry attend and support 
the Methodist church, of which he has been a 
trustee for several years. Mrs. Terry is one 
of the most active members of the society. 



-OHN EVERETT, a lawyer of Canton, 
Mass., was born in I'o.xboro, May 16, 
1852, and is the son of Colonel John 
Metcalf Everett and Elizabeth Morse 
Barrett Everett. His great-grandfather, John 
Everett (an uncle of Edward Everett, Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, and his brother, Alex- 
ander H. Everett, lawyer and diplomatist), 
lived in Stoughton and Dedham previous to 
the Revolutionary War, in which he served as 



Captain, in Dorchester and other places, and 
in Rhode Island. When Eoxboro was set off 
as a town, he was the first Selectman and 
Representative to the General Court. He 
held the place of Representative for many 
years, and died in Foxboro. 

Colonel John M. Everett, father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in I-'oxboro in 
1803. He carried on the business of straw 
manufacturer for many years, and on retiring 
from that enterprise he bought the hotel called 
the Half-way House, where he resided several 
years, holding court as a Justice and carry- 
ing on a farm. He was also Selectman and 
Representative. In politics he was a Re- 
publican. He had charge of the schools of 
Foxboro for some years. As civil engineer 
he made the map of the town. He was a 
prominent man in military matters, was Colo- 
nel of the Second Regiment, Massachusetts 
Militia, and also served on the General's staff. 
He married Elizabeth Morse Barrett, a lady 
of culture and refinement, daughter of Amos 
Barrett, and they had these children: Met- 
calf, named after his grandfather, Captain 
Metcalf Everett; John, the subject of this 
sketch; and Elizabeth. Metcalf Everett died 
in New York City, where he was engaged in 
business. On the death of the Hon. M. 
Everett, who was a prominent lawyer in 
Wrentham, Colonel John M. Everett removed 
to that place; and there he died in April, 
1883, at the advanced age of eighty years. 

John Everett, the subject of this sketch, re- 
ceived his early education in the F"oxboro 
High School, graduating in 1868, while that 
school was under the supervision of his father, 
and in New York. He taught school a few 
years as principal of large grammar schools. 
The Everett School, it may be mentioned, 
where Richard Olney, Attorney-General of the 
United States during President Cleveland's 
second administration, once taught, now 
hears the family name, by vote of the town, 
in honor of the father and son, both former 
teachers of this school. In 1876 Mr. 
P2verett commenced the study of law with 
Ellis Ames, Esq., of Canton, and in 1879 
was admitted as an attorney and counsellor-at- 
law to practise in all the courts. He has 
since been in active practice in Canton, sue- 



286 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



ceeding Mr. Ames, and occupying his noted 
office. In politics lie is a Republican. He 
has served as Moderator, School Committee, 
Auditor of Public Accounts, Town Treasurer, 
chairman of Selectmen, and chairman of the 
Water Commissioners. For the pa.st five 
years he has been chairman of the Committee 
of Fifteen on Recommendations to the Town, 
and is now honorably retired by rule of the 
town, fixing this limit. Mr. Everett is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge, and has been 
trustee of the Odd Fellows Lodge for several 
years. He is also president and director of 
the Co-operative Bank, and takes a deep inter- 
est in the peace, industry, prosperity, and 
happiness of the people. Mr. Everett has 
never married. 




iHARLES ILSLEY PORTER, M.D., 
of Canton, Mass., is a native of Nor- 
folk County. He was born in 
Weymouth on November 27, 1865, 
the son of George E. and Amanda (Cushing) 
Porter. His branch of the family is de- 
scended from Richard Porter, who was one of 
the company of about one hundred persons 
that came from Weymouth, England, to Mas- 
sachusetts in 1635, ^nd settled at the place 
then known as Wessagussett, which name was 
shortly changed to Weymouth, the territory 
remaining the same, it is said, to this day. 
John Porter, son of Richard, married in 1660 
a daughter of Nicholas Byram. As we learn 
from the "Porter Genealogy," by the Hon. Jo- 
seph W. Porter, of Burlington, Me., the line 
continues thus: Samuel,' Samuel," Joseph,' 
Lebbeus,'' Whitcomb,' George E.,^ Charles 
Ilsley." Lieutenant Joseph Porter 5 married 
ill 1753 Elizabeth Burrill, a "woman of re- 
markable personal beauty," a school-teacher, 
daughter of Samuel and Content (Whitcomb) 
Burrill. Lebbeus Porter, "^ born in 1771, great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, spent 
the greater part of his married life in 
Wrentham, Mass. His son, Whitcomb Porter, 
who was a prominent insurance agent of Bos- 
ton, for many years was engaged in business on 
State Street, and resided in Quincy. His 
wife, who was a daughter of Ebenezer and 
Betsy (Nash) Hunt, of Weymouth, was a di- 



rect descendant of John and Priscilla Alden, of 
the Plymouth colony. 

George E. Porter, son of Whitcomb and 
Susan (Hunt) Porter, was born in 1828. For 
thirty years he was a prominent shoe manu- 
facturer in Weymouth, Mass. He married 
Amanda dishing, daughter of Simeon Cush- 
ing, and had five children, as follows: Edith, 
Alice, Susan H., Charles Ilsley, and Edgar. 
Edith Porter is the wife of the Rev. L. S. 
Crossley, of South Framingham, Mass. 
Edgar died at the age of forty-one years. 
Mr. George E. Porter died at his home in 
Weymouth, at the age of sixty-eight years, 
November 23, 1896. 

Charles Ilsley, now the only surviving son, 
received his early education in the common 
schools and the high school of his native town, 
and was tutored for one year. He entered 
the Boston University Medical School in 
188.4, was graduated in 1888, and in the fall 
of the same year settled as a physician in Can- 
ton, Mass., where he has since remained, ac- 
tive in his profession, with an increasing 
practice. In politics he is a Republican; but 
he has not held public office, having declined 
to serve on the Board of Health, as he believes 
a physician should give all his time to those 
who employ his services. On October 6, 
1 89 1, he married Margery, daughter of Joseph 
W. Wattles, one of the prominent manufact- 
urers of the town. Dr. and Mrs. Porter have 
one child, a daughter named Helen M. The 
Doctor and his wife are attendants at the Uni- 
tarian church. 



TT^HARLES ALLEN HOWLAND, a 
I \y well-known and esteemed citizen of 
^yjs^^ Quincy, the president of the Mount 
Wollaston National Bank, and the 
president and treasurer of the Quincy Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company, was born in Worces- 
ter, Mass., September 4, 1829. A son of 
Southworth Allen Howland, he is a direct de- 
scendant in the seventh generation of John 
Howland, whose signature is the thirteenth of 
the forty-one names appended to the memo- 
rable compact made in the cabin of the "May- 
flower" in Cape Cod Harbor, November 21, 
1620, At that time he was twenty-one years 




CHARLES A. HOWLANU. 



BIOGRAPIIICAI. REVIEW 



289 



old. From the day of his departure from 
England he had been a member of the family 
of John Carver, the first Governor of the 
Plymouth Colony. He was one of the "prin- 
cipal men " who were sent out in a boat 
manned by eight sailors to select a place in 
which the weary band might settle, and who, 
upon being driven by a storm into Plymouth 
Harbor, made choice of Plymouth. This 
John Howland was subsequently a prominent 
man in the new colony. In 1633, 1634, and 
1635 he was one of the seven members of the 
Governor's Council. He was also Assessor in 
1633, and in 1636 he served on a jury. In 
1643 he was a soldier in the Plymouth Mili- 
tary Company, and in 1666 was Selectman of 
the town. He was Assessor in 1633 and 
1634 and a member of Governor Bradford's 
Council in 1633-35. He was chosen Deputy 
in 1641, 1645 to 1652, 1656, 1658, 1661, 
1663, 1666, 1667, and 1670. After the elec- 
tion which was held on June 2, 1670, he re- 
fused to become a candidate again. He died 
February 23, 1673, over eighty years old. 
He married Elizabeth Tilley, a daughter of 
John Tilley. She died December 21, 1687, 
aged fourscore years. 

John Howland (second), son of the Pil- 
grim, born in Plymouth, October 26, 1627, 
married a daughter of Robert Lee, of Barn- 
stable. He lived for a time in Marshfield, 
Mass., where he was highly respected as a 
systematic and energetic business man. The 
next ancestor was their son, John Howland 
(third), who was born in Barnstable, Decem- 
ber 31, 1664. On June i, 17 19, he married 
for his second wife, Mary Crocker, who was 
born June 6, 1681. Their son Job, who, born 
in Barnstable, June 18, 1726, died in the 
same town. May i, 1794, married December 
6, 1753, Hannah Jenkins, a daughter of Ben- 
jamin Jenkins, and a grand-daughter of Joseph 
and Mary (Howland) Jenkins. .She was born 
in 1733, and died September 21, 1781. 
Their son Southworth, the grandfather of 
Charles Allen Howland, was born March 29, 
1775, in the town of Barnstable, where he 
spent his early years. Subsequently in Con- 
way, Mass., he learned the trade of a house 
carpenter from his brother John, and, on com- 
ing of age, settled in West Brookfield, Mass. 



A very skilful and ingenious workman, he was 
often called upon to do jobs entirely foreign 
to his trade. On one occasion he was asked 
to alter and fit an artificial leg that had been 
imjiorteil from England by one of his neigh- 
bors. He, however, found it easier to make 
a new one, adding such improvements as to 
give full satisfaction to the wearer. His suc- 
cess became widely known, and in the ensu- 
ing forty years he was often called upon to 
furnish artificial limbs to men and women in 
various parts of the United States, he being 
the only manufacturer of them, so far as 
known, for many years thereafter. He was 
a man of decided convictions, and was prompt 
and fearless in expressing and defending them. 
As early as 18 12 both he and his good wife 
[iledged themselves not to touch intoxicating 
drinks when passed around in company, as 
was then the universal custom; and a short 
time afterward they joined, with a few of their 
neighbors, in forming a society for the ])ro- 
motion of temperance. He likewise had pub- 
lished at his own expense, for free distri- 
bution, a tract written on that subject by the 
noted Dr. Rush. On November 24, 1797, 
he married Esther Allen, a daughter of 
Nathan and Persis Allen, of West Brookfield. 
She was born December 18, 1780, and died 
October 12, 1812. On March 13, 1816, he 
married fo his second wife Polly Ware, a 
daughter of Dr. Samuel and Bethia (Avery) 
Ware, of Conway, Mass. She was born De- 
cember 5, 1785, and died February 11, 1870. 
Southworth Allen Howland, born in West 
Brookfield, Mass., September 11, 1800, died 
in Worcester, Mass., October 7, 1882. He 
learned the trade of a bookbinder in Plym- 
outh, Mass., and in 1821 opened a book store 
and bindery in Worcester, both of which he 
conducted for more than a quarter of a cen- 
tury. In 1852 he went into the insurance 
business, and was afterward engaged therein 
during the rest of his active years. He was 
also a publisher of some note. Among the 
books issued by him were: "Historical Col- 
lections of Massachusetts," "Historical Col- 
lections of New England," and a cook-book, 
entitled "The Economical Housekeeper," of 
which nearly two hundred thousand copies 
were sold. He married Esther Allen, a 



290 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



daughter of Captain William Allen, of Plym- 
outh, and became the father of five children; 
namely. South worth A., Esther A., Charles 
A., Edward Payson, and William O. Both 
he and his wife were members of the Congre- 
gational church. A man of sterling worth, he 
was respected by all who knew him. An 
obituary referring to him has the following: 
"He was an active, useful citizen, an ener- 
getic worker, charitable and kind to all, a man 
who loved his home." 

Charles Allen Howland attended the com- 
mon and high schools of Worcester. After- 
ward he studied with a private tutor, and com- 
pleted his education at the Leicester Acad- 
emy. While going to school, he learned the 
bookbinder's trade with his father. After 
leaving the academy, he was employed in the 
Registry of Deeds for two and one-half years. 
While there he spent most of his leisure time 
in the office of his father, who had changed 
his business from that of a bookseller and 
binder to that of an insurance agent, and was 
then representing several companies, includ- 
ing the Ouincy Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, at that time but four or five years in 
existence. He helped his father in making 
out surveys, applications, plans, etc. Some 
of this work e.xecuted by him, when sent to 
the main office in Ouincy, attracted the atten- 
tion of the secretary, who wrote to the agent 
in Worcester, inquiring whom he had for a 
clerk. On being told that it was his son 
Charles, the secretary visited Worcester for 
the purpose of hiring the said son Charles as a 
clerk in the Ouincy office, offering him as an 
inducement eleven dollars per week. Mr. 
Howland accepted the offer, coming at once to 
Ouincy, where he has since resided. In three 
months he mastered the details of his work, 
and during the first year he adjusted a few 
losses for the company. The work done by 
him in the second year was so satisfactory 
that he was appointed adjuster, and in the en- 
suing year he was made assistant secretary. 
On -December 13, i860, the secretary of the 
company had a stroke of paralysis; and the 
charge of the office was intrusted to Mr. How- 
land. On April 14, 1861, he was regularly 
elected secretary of the company, a position in 
which he subsequently served with great abil- 



ity and fidelity for nearly twenty-four years. 
In 1884 he was elected president and treas- 
urer of the corporation. He is also interested 
in other business enterprises. A director of 
the Mount VVollaston National Bank for the 
past twenty years, he has been its president 
since 1893. He is likewise a trustee of the 
Ouincy Savings Bank; a director of the Hing- 
ham Cordage Company; director of the Law- 
rence Duck Company, manufacturers of cotton 
duck, of Lawrence, Mass. ; and he is the chair- 
man of the Board of Managers of Adams 
Academy. He has steadily refused all politi- 
cal office. Outside his business relations he 
takes much interest in psychology, and is a 
member of the Psychological Society of 
Boston. 

On January 5, 1871, Mr. Howland married 
Miss Helen M. Moore, a daughter of the 
Rev. Josiah Moore, of Duxbury, Mass. They 
have two children, namely: Mabel, now the 
wife of Francis H. Lister, who is a chief en- 
gineer in the British army; and Charles A. 
Howland, Jr., a member of the class of 1900 
at Harvard College. 




DWARD BANGS RICHARDSON, a 
well-known and highly esteemed resi- 
dent of Brookline, living on Davis 
Avenue, is now United States clerk at the 
Boston custom-house, with which he has been 
connected a quarter of a century. He has 
been employed in various capacities; and his 
continuous retention in the civil service 
through the last six Presidential administra- 
tions is in itself a speaking evidence of his 
ability, fidelity, and popularity. He was 
born May 20, 1838, in Worcester, Mass., a 
son of Peter and Hitty S. (Prentise) Richard- 
son. 

His ancestors were among the early settlers 
of Princeton, Worcester County; and there 
his paternal grandparents, Samuel and Lucy 
(Mirick) Richardson, spent their entire lives, 
each dying at an advanced age. 

Peter Richardson was born in Princeton, 
and in common with his numerous brothers 
and sisters was brought up on the home farm. 
In his younger days he was employed for a 
time as a clerk in a store in his native town, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



291 



afterward going into business for himself in 
Worcester, where he remained some years. 
In 1848 he opened a large grocery store in 
Boston, but shortly removed to Brookline, 
and here spent the last thirty-five years 
of his life, dying at the age of eighty years. 
As a man of sterling integrity he was highly 
respected. He attended and supported the 
Unitarian church. He married Hitty Spencer 
Prentise, who was born in Princeton, where 
her father, Henry Prentise, was engaged as a 
blacksmith. Her mother, whose maiden name 
was Abigail Gill, was a niece of Lieutenant 
Governor Gill, who was Acting Governor 1799 
to May, 1800. Her early home was on School 
Street, Boston, near Tremont Street, occupy- 
ing the present site of the Parker House. 

Peter Richardson and his wife reared ten 
children, five of whom are now living, as fol- 
lows: William E., Thomas E., George P., 
Spencer W., and Edward Bangs. Five of 
the.ir sons participated in the late Civil War, 
all serving as commissioned officers: James, 
as a Captain in the Twenty-first Massachu- 
setts and later a Lieutenant Colonel of the 
Third Massachusetts Heavy Artillery; Will- 
iam, as a Quartermaster and a Captain in 
the Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteer In- 
fantry; George P., First Lieutenant in the 
Third Heavy Artillery; Spencer W., a Cap- 
tain in the Forty-fourth Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry; and Edward B., the special 
subject of this sketch, who was First Lieu- 
tenant in the Forty-fifth Massachusetts Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and later of the United States 
Signal Corps. These five brothers are all 
credited to the quota of the town of Brook- 
line. They served their country with fidelity, 
and each was discharged with an honorable 
record. Their mother, who spent her last 
years at the home of her son, Edward B. , in 
Brookline, retained her mental faculties and 
her physical vigor until about a year before 
her death, which occurred when she was 
ninety years old. The graves of the parents 
are in the family lot in Walnut Hill Ceme- 
tery. 

Edward B. Richardson was but one year old 
when his parents left Worcester. After a 
brief stay in Boston he came with them to 
Brookline, then a small village with scarce a 



thousand inhabitants, now a prosperous town 
that has increased in population and valua- 
tion with phenomenal rapidity. After his 
graduation at the high school he began work 
in the office of the Manchester Print Works in 
Boston; and in 1858 he entered the Bank of 
Mutual Redemption in that city as receiving 
teller, remaining there three years. In 1862 
he enlisted in Company A, Forty-fifth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry, as First Lieuten- 
ant of the company. He was later assigned 
to the United States Signal Corps with the same 
rank, which was the highest in that branch of 
the service, and continued there until the close 
of the war. Soon after his discharge he went 
to Burlington, la., as private secretary of Gen- 
eral William B. Strong, who was general 
freight agent and superintendent of the Bur- 
lington & Missouri Railway Company. Hav- 
ing resigned that position in 1871, in the 
ensuing year he was appointed Inspector of 
Customs, and has since held positions in 
nearly every department in the custom-house. 
In 1894 he was made storekeeper. 

Mr. Richardson is a stanch Republican in 
politics. He is a prominent comrade of C. L. 
Chandler Post, No. 143, G. A. R., of which 
he has been Commander; is Master Workman 
of the A. O. U. W. , and a life member of its 
Grand Lodge; is also a member of the Mili- 
tary Order of the Loyal Legion of the United 
States, which is composed of officers of the 
army and navy who served in the late Rebell- 
ion. 

On May 10, 1881, Mr. Richardson married 
Miss Amanda Jellison, a daughter of James 
Jellison, of Calais, Me. Liberal in religious 
belief, Mr. and Mrs. Richardson attend the 
Unitarian church. 



/rr^APTAIN EDWIN DEXTER WADS- 
I \y WORTH, of Milton, one of the Com- 
^^Hs missioners of Norfolk County, was 

born in this town, December 3, 
1832, son of Thomas Thacher and Mary 
(Bradlee) Wadsworth. His father was a na- 
tive of Milton; and his mother was born in 
Brookline, Mass. Captain Wadsworth is of 
the eighth generation in descent from Chris- 
topher Wadsworth, who emigrated from Eng- 



292 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



land in 1632, and settled in Duxbury. Tiie 
lineage is as follows: Christopher,' Captain 
Samuel,-' Deacon John,* Deacon Benjamin,-' 
John, 5 Benjamin,'' Thomas Thacher,' Edwin 
Dexter.* 

The Rev. Benjamin Wadsworth, D.D., 
president of Harvard College, 1725-37, was 
the youngest son of Captain Samuel Wads- 
worth. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Amer- 
ican poet and scholar, son of Stephen and 
Zilpha (Wadsworth) Longfellow, was a grand- 
son of General Peleg Wadsworth, who was of 
the fifth generation in descent from Christo- 
pher, of Duxbury, the line descending from 
his son John.- 

Captain Samuel Wadsworth settled in 
1656 in what was then a part of Dorchester 
and is now Milton, where he became proprie- 
tor of a large tract of land, including Wads- 
worth Hill, on which is situated the estate 
owned and occupied by the subject of this 
sketch. Captain Wadsworth was killed at 
Sudbury in April, 1676, while defending that 
town from an attack by the Indians during 
King Philip's War. He is said to have been 
at that time forty-six years of age. The spot 
where he and other brave officers and soldiers 
were slain is now marked by a monument at 
Green Hill, Sudbury, where the bicentennial 
anniversary of the battle was celebrated in 1876. 

Captain Samuel Wadsworth's descendants 
have now for more than two and a half cen- 
turies been identified with the town of Milton. 
Representatives of four generations of the fam- 
ily, including Captain Edwin D. Wadsworth's 
father, have been members of the General 
Court; and Thomas T. Wadsworth, was also 
prominent in the public affairs of Milton, 
serving as a Selectman and in other town 
offices. He died in 1883. 

Edwin D. Wadsworth was graduated from 
the Milton Academy ; and in 1849, when in 
his seventeenth year, he went to California by 
way of Cape Horn, remaining there about a 
year and a half. After his return he entered 
the merchant marine service, in which he 
rapidly worked his way forward; and as mas- 
ter of vessels engaged in the foreign trade 
he visited the principal ports of Europe, 
South America, and the Far East. During 
the Civil War he commanded a transport 



steamer conveying soldiers to different poinLs 
of destination along the Southern coast; and 
he was later in command of steamships of the 
Cromwell and Black Star lines, plying be- 
tween New York and New Orleans. In 1868 
he abandoned the sea, and, settling in Milton, 
was for a number of years engaged in the coal 
business. 

In politics he is a Republican. He has 
served as a member of the Board of Select- 
men; was a member of the School Board six 
years, a part of the time acting as its chair- 
man; is now serving his fourth year as chair- 
man of the Board of Assessors, and was 
elected a County Commissioner for three 
years in 1896. He was one of the promoters 
of the Milton Water Works, is actively inter- 
esting himself in securing an improved sewer- 
age system for the town, and as a public- 
spirited citizen is always ready with his influ- 
ence to aid in forwarding all measures calcu- 
lated to be of benefit to the community. He 
is a charter member and a Past Master of 
Macedonian Lodge, ¥. & A. M., has been 
treasurer of the Boston Marine Society for 
the past twelve years, and for five years sec- 
retary of the Society of California Pioneers of 
New England. He is a member of the Soci- 
ety of Colonial \\'ars, and of the Sons of the 
American Revolution. 

Captain Wadsworth married Ellen M. Emer- 
son, daughter of the late Joshua Emerson, of 
Milton, and has two children — Dexter E. and 
Annie M. Wadsworth. 



UDGE LOUIS A. COOK, of Wey- 
mouth, Clerk of Courts for Norfolk 
County, was born in Blackstone, Mass., 
May 4, 1847. A son of Louis and Orinda 
Ballou (Cook) Cook, he traces his ancestry to 
Walter Cook, who settled in Weymouth at 
some time previous to the year 1643. After- 
ward, in company with a number of others 
from Weymouth and Braintree, Walter settled 
in what is now the town of Mendon, Mass. 
During King Philip's War he, with the other 
members of the company, was driven back to 
Weymouth; but he subsequently returned, and 
died in Mendon. 

Ichabod Cook, the grandfather of the sub- 




LOUIS A. LOOK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



29s 



ject of this sketch, was a prosperous farmer of 
Blackstone — which was formerly a part of 
Mendon — the author of two or three books, 
and also a Quaker preacher. He served a 
term in the legislature, and died at the age of 
seventy. The maiden name of his wife was 
Louisa Cook. His son Louis, a man of 
scholarly attainments, taught in the Friends' 
Boarding-school at Providence, R. I., and was 
a member of the School Committee in Black- 
stone. He married Orinda Ballou Cook on 
October 16, 1843, and died at the age of 
thirty-five. The widow survived him until 
the fifty-sixth year of her age. 

Louis A. Cook spent the most of his early 
life at Candlewood, a farm in Blackstone that 
derived its name from a neighboring hill 
where pine knots were obtained for illumina- 
tion. He was well educated in the public 
schools of Blackstone and Woonsocket, R.I., 
and at Phillips Exeter Academy. Several 
years of his boyhood were spent in semi- 
invalidism through a severe injury, acciden- 
tally received when he was eleven years old, 
and which threatened to be fatal. Having, 
however, recovered his normal health and 
strength, and after spending a short time in 
business, he engaged in school -teaching at 
the age of twenty-two, and subsequently 
taught in Bellingham, Blackstone, Smithfield, 
and Manville. At the age of twenty-five he 
was made head master of the Bates Grammar 
School, located in South Weymouth, where he 
has since resided. 

In November, 1879, he was elected Repre- 
sentative to the State legislature'; and in Jan- 
uary, 1880, he resigned his position as teacher 
to take his seat. He afterward pursued the 
study of law, to which he had previously given 
some attention, and was admitted to the Plym- 
outh County bar at Plymouth, November 13, 
1884. Offices were opened by him at Abing- 
ton. South Weymouth, and afterward at Bos- 
ton, with Messrs. William J. Coughlan and 
Daniel R. Coughlan, under the firm name of 
Cook & Coughlan. In 1889 and 1890 he was 
again a member of the State legislature. In 
the convention of the First District delegates 
held in 1892 he was for a time the leading 
candidate for the Senatorial nomination, with 
more than eighty ballots in his favor, and in 



three ballots came within one vote of the nom- 
ination, which was finally won near midnight 
by the Hon. John F. Merrill, of Quincy. He 
has served as a member of the School Com- 
mittee both in Blackstone and Weymouth, and 
for a number of years he has been chosen 
Moderator of the annual town meetings of 
Weymouth. He is chairman of the Park 
Commissioners of Weymouth and a trustee of 
the Tufts (town) Library. On July 30, 1896, 
he was appointed one of the Special Justices 
of the District Court of East Norfolk. Re- 
ferring to that event, the Boston Herald of 
July 24, 1896, said, "The appointment by 
Governor Wolcott of Louis A. Cook, of Wey- 
mouth, to the position of Special Justice of 
the District Court at East Norfolk that holds 
its sessions at Quincy, gives great satisfaction 
to the appointee's hosts of friends." In No- 
vember, 1896, after a hot contest in the 
county convention and at the polls, he was 
elected Clerk of Courts for Norfolk County by 
a plurality of more than four thousand votes. 
During the canvass the leading papers of the 
county published many complimentary notices 
of his life and character. 

Unlike many men who have been successful 
in the political field. Judge Cook is a strict 
temperance man. He is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Good Templars and of the 
Order of the Golden Cross. During his first 
year in the legislature he had charge of all 
the prohibition legislation. It was mainly 
through his efforts that the celebrated "screen 
law," compelling saloon proprietors to remove 
screens from their doors and windows, was 
passed. Judge Cook also belongs to the 
Royal Arcanum and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. In August, 1893, he was 
elected to the highest State office in the latter 
fraternity, and he was Massachusetts repre- 
sentative at Chicago in the demonstration 
made by the order at the World's Fair in the 
same year. In 1894 he was one of the repre- 
sentatives to the Sovereign Lodge from Mas- 
sachusetts at Chattanooga, Tenn., when the 
members were quartered and the session was 
held at Lookout Inn, on the summit of Look- 
out Mountain; and he served in the same ca- 
pacity in the session of 1895, held at Atlantic 
City, N.J. 



296 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



On February 22, 1876, Judge Cook married 
Lucinda A. Clark, who was born in Smith- 
field, R. I. , d:uit;hter of Joseph S. Clark. Mrs. 
Cook is one of five children. Their children 
are: Louis A., Jr., now a student at Yale 
University; Sidney R. ; and Florence M. 




MOS H. BRAINARD is prominently 
associated with the manufacturing in- 
terests of Norfolk County, being 
general manager and treasurer of 
the Hraiiiard Milling Machine Company, which 
is iDcated in Hyde Park. He was born in 
Newburyport, Mass. ; and his father, Joseph 
Brainard, was a native of the same city, and tra- 
ditionally the lineal descendant of "one of two 
brothers who came from England to America 
in 1640." 

Joseph Brainard was reared in Newburyport, 
where he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, 
and was for some time there engaged in busi- 
ness. He subsequently removed to Boston 
and embarked in business as a stair-builder, 
following that trade principally until his death 
at the age of seventy-one years. He married 
Miss Fdnah Haskell, who was born in Deer 
Isle, Me. This town was also the birthplace 
of her father, Caleb Haskell, who served in 
the Revolution, being a participant in several 
engagements, including the battle of Bunker 
fTill and Arnold's expedition to Quebec. 
After the close of the war Mr. Haskell settled 
in Newburyport, where most of his ten chil- 
dren were reared. The children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Brainard were five in number, 
all being boys, and two are still living, 
namely: Samuel, a resident of Iowa; and 
Amos H., the subject of this sketch. The 
parents were both members of the First Con- 
gregational Church of Newburyport. 

Amos H. Brainard spent his childhood and 
youth in his native city, acquiring his educa- 
tion in the public schools. During his early 
manhood he was engaged in various employ- 
ments, mostly of a mechanical nature; and he 
learned the trade of a carriage-maker in Bos- 
ton. He subsequently established a machine 
shop in that city, but later, transferring his 
business to Hyde Park, under the name of the 
Union Vise Company began the manufacture 



of vises of his own invention. He employed 
a force of seventy men in his factory, and 
during the five years in which he was thus en- 
gaged turned out forty thousand vises. He 
then embarked in the milling machine busi- 
ness, being a pioneer in this industry, in which 
he has been eminently successful. The com- 
pany began on a modest scale, and gradually 
enlarged their works. Having secured a large 
number of patents upon the inventions of Mr. 
Brainard, they are now carrying on the most 
extensive and lucrative business of any firm 
similarly engaged in this or any other countr)-. 
One hundred and fifty men are kept constantly 
employed, the demand for their manufactures 
being great throughout all parts of the United 
States as well as in foreign countries. They 
have branch houses in all the large European 
cities, and they ship goods to China and other 
Asiatic ports. Making a specialty of milling 
machines and of automatic gear cutting ma- 
chines, they carry out the American idea of 
keeping a supply of interchangeable parts of 
machinery. Mr. Brainard is a very intelli- 
gent, energetic and capable man, a typical 
"Captain of Industry," and his well-written 
and interesting articles on various topics con- 
nected with machinery, which frequently ap- 
pear in journals devoted to mechanics, are 
widely read. Since 1858 he has made his 
home in Hyde Park, where he is one of the 
most prominent and influential citizens. 

Mr. Brainard is the father of eight children, 
namely: Genevieve; Florence, wife of George 
D. Thayer, a shoe merchant in Boston, and 
mother of three children — Lila, Harry B. , 
and Burgess; and Amos D., who married 
Marie Louise Gridley, and is in partnership 
with his father; Josephine, Edith I., Marian, 
and Ida A. Josephine is the wife of Ran- 
dolph P. Moseley, of whom a sketch appears 
elsewhere in this volume; Edith I. is the wife 
of John L. Barry, Jr., a resident of Hyde Park, 
in business in Boston, and has three children 
— Margaret L. , John L. , and Edward H. ; 
Ednah, who married E. McAdam, died at the 
age of thirty years, leaving two children — 
Linda B. and Edith G. ; and Ida A., the wife 
of O. S. Hyde, a wool merchant in Wrentham, 
has two children — Stillman B. and Amos B. 

Mr. Brainard is one of the leading Republi- 




AMOS H. URAINARU. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



299 



cans of this vicinity, and takes an active part 
in local affairs. He has served as Selectman 
of Hyde Park nine years, being chairman of 
the board one year; was also Overseer of the 
Poor, being chairman of the board one year; 
and for many years has served as a trustee of 
the public library, for several years as chair- 
man of the board. He is a trustee and vice- 
preside]it of the savings-bank; is a charter 
member of the Hyde Park Trust and Safe De- 
posit Company; and was the first president of 
the Hyde Park Historical Society. He at- 
tends the Episcopal church, of which Mrs. 
I^rainard is a communicant, and takes great 
interest in that organization, having been its 
first Senior Warden. 




'RANCIS L. BABCOCK, M.D., a 
highly esteemed citizen of Dedham, 
where he is successfully engaged in the 
practice of medicine, also now serving as 
county physician and as chairman of the Ded- 
ham Board of Health, was born June 12, 
1849, in the neighboring town of Medfield in 
the same county. He is a son of the late 
Benjamin J. Babcock, and is descended from 
one of the early families of this part of Mas- 
sachusetts, the emigrant ancestor having come 
from England at an early period. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Lowell Babcock, was born 
and reared in Norfolk County, and during his 
active life was engaged as a blacksmith in 
Sherborn, Middlesex County, where he died at 
the age of seventy-five years. 

Benjamin J. Babcock was born in Sherborn. 
He learned the trarle of a baker in Medfield, 
where he subsequently followed this occupa- 
tion, first as a journeyman and later in busi- 
ness for himself, living there until 1876, 
when he moved to Middleboro, Mass. Later 
he settled in Dedham, where he died when 
but sixty-si.x years old. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Milletiah T. Johnson, was 
born in Medfield, a daughter of Oliver John- 
son, for many years a harness-maker in that 
town. She died at the age of forty years, 
having borne her husband four sons and one 
daughter. The four sons grew to maturity, 
three of them being now living, as follows: 
Francis L., the subject of this brief sketch; 



Albert J. ; and Charles B. Both of the par- 
ents were valued members of the Jiaptist 
church of Medfield, the father having .served 
many years as a Deacon. 

Francis L. Babcock was brought up and ed- 
ucated in Medfield, attending first the district 
schools and later the high school. He began 
life for himself as a carriage-maker, being en- 
gaged in the business for eleven years. Ever 
keeping in mind his determination to pursue 
a professional calling, he continued his 
studies, and in 1876 entered Boston Univer- 
sity Medical School, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1879. Dr. Babcock at once began 
the practice of his profession in Dedham, 
where by prompt and faithful attention to his 
duties he has won a large and constantly 
growing practice. He is identified by mem- 
bership with the Massachusetts State Homceo- 
pathic Medical Society and the American 
Medical Institute of Homoeopathy. He is 
now serving as county physician, is chairman 
of the Dedham Board of Health, of which he 
has been a member for eight years, and is also 
a member of the School Board, with which he 
has been connected eight years. 

Dr. Babcock was married November 27, 
1S73, to Miss Frances J. Daniels, daughter of 
I'rank P. and Jane F. (Ellis) Daniels, of 
Medway, where her father was engaged in the 
manufacture of boots and shoes until his 
death. The Doctor and Mrs. Babcock have 
one child, Millie ¥. Babcock. 

Dr. Babcock is a strong Republican in poli- 
tics, and, in addition to his other town offices, 
has been a Park Commissioner several years. 
He is a member of Constellation Lodge, F. & 
A. M.; of Norfolk Chapter; of Hyde Park 
Council; and of Cypress Commandery, K. T. 
He is also a member of the A. O. U. W. 
and a charter member of the Royal Arcanum 
and the Home Circle, in which he has held 
many offices. He is the examining surgeon 
of the Travellers' Commercial Insurance Com- 
pany, his outside work, with his regular prac- 
tice, taking up all of his time. The Doctor 
and Mrs. Babcock are active members of the 
Baptist church and of the Sunday-school con- 
nected with it, in which both take great in- 
terest. The Doctor is also chairman of the 
trustees of the church, 



500 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 




ILLIAM MANN, who was formerly 
a scythe-maker, and is now residing 
upon a farm in I'"ranklin, Norfolk 
County, Mass., was born December ii, 1819, 
in Chesterfield, N.H., where his parents, 
Thomas VV. and Ruth (Buxton) Mann, 
natives of Smithfield, R. I., had settled in 
18 1 8. His father was for a few years 
there engaged in the manufacture of scythes. 
In 1852 the family removed to Franklin, 
Mass., where the father joined them in 1856; 
and they resided in this town for the rest of 
their lives. Thomas VV. Mann died in 1864, 
and his wife died in 1871. They were the 
parents of five children, of whom the only sur- 
vivor is William, the subject of this sketch. 
The others were: Emily; Ruth Elizabeth; 
Diana; and Susan Caroline, who died at the 
age of three years. 

William Mann acquired a common-school 
education ; and at tlie age of seventeen years 
he went to Smithfield, R.I., where he began 
work in a scythe manufactory. He served his 
apprenticeship, and followed the trade as a 
journeyman for thirty-five years, during which 
time he worked in Maine, New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, New York, and Montreal, 
Canada. In 1852 he settled upon the farm in 
Franklin where he now resides, but continued 
to work as a scythe-maker for several years. 
He then relinquished it, and entered the wood 
and coal trade, in which he was engaged for 
fifteen years. He now owns thirty acres of 
fertile land, well adapted to the cultivation of 
general crops; and he also has a dairy, and 
raises poultry. For sixteen years he sup- 
ported the Liberty party (anti-slavery), he was 
a Republican twenty-seven years, and for the 
past six years has been a Prohibitionist. 

In 1849 Mr. Mann married for his first 
wife Sarah B. Metcalf, of Winthrop, Me., 
daughter of Deacon Addison A. and Chloe F. 
(Adams) Metcalf, neither of whom is now liv- 
ing. Mrs. Metcalf, who reached the advanced 
age of one hundred years, died in Walpole, 
Mass., in July, 1897. Mrs. Sarah B. Met- 
calf Mann died in 1872; and in 1879 Mr. 
Mann married Mrs. Mary W. Smith, daughter 
of Michael Bright, of Stoughton, Mass. Mr. 
Mann's first wife was the mother of five 
children, namely: Emily; Harriet; William 



A., who died at the age of seven years; 
Alden Taylor; and Mary. Emily is the wife 
of Willard E. Everett, of Lowell, Mass., ad- 
vertising agent for Hood's Sarsaparilla ; Har- 
riet married the Rev. N. T. Dyer, a Con- 
gregational preacher in Ashburnham, Mass. ; 
Alden Taylor Mann, who married Elsie Smith, 
is connected with the Steinhert Company, a 
pianoforte concern in Lowell ; and Mary is the 
wife of Henry Smith, a life insurance agent 
of that city. 

As an artisan Mr. Mann acquired a wide 
reputation, his services being in constant de- 
mand while he followed his trade. As a 
farmer he is equally successful; and as a man 
he is highly esteemed for his many estimable 
qualities, not the least of them being his gen- 
erosity and public spirit. He was an early 
abolitionist, a coworker with Garrison, Pills- 
bury, and Phillips; and he has always been a 
firm friend of the temperance cause. A great 
reader, he is well informed on many questions, 
and is strong in argument. Possessed of deep 
religious convictions, he is a ready defender 
of the Bible and an expounder of its 
teachings. 




RANCIS OLIVER PHILLIPS, the 
representative of one of the oldest fam- 
ilies in Millis, was born where he now 
resides, January 8, 1829, son of Oliver and 
Hannah (Richardson) Phillips. The grand- 
father, Jedediah Phillips, who was reared and 
educated in Phillipston, Mass., settled here 
when a young man, and was actively engaged 
in agricultural pursuits until his ninety-sec- 
ond year. He was the father of ten children, 
none of whom are living. 

Oliver Phillips, who was born June 10, 
1789, on the site of Millis, learned the wheel- 
wright's trade, and followed it for many years 
in connection with farming. Settling in 1815 
upon the farm his son now occupies, he culti- 
vated it successfully during the rest of his ac- 
tive years. His first wife, Hannah, who was 
born in the same district, died in 1855. He 
was again married to Mrs. Irene Hawes, a 
daughter of Simeon Richardson, of this town, 
and who died in 1875. Oliver Phillips's 
children, all by his first union, were: 




BEXJAMIX F. SHUMWAY. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



303 



Amanda, born March 31, 1809; Elisha R., 
born April 5, 181 1; Sarah E., born Septem- 
ber 17, 1813; Hannah, born November 23, 
i8l6; and Francis O., the subject of this 
siietch. Amanda, who married Joim Harber, 
died July 18, 1834; Elisha R., now deceased, 
married Elizabeth Daniels; Sarah K., also de- 
ceased, married Ellis Daniels, who died July 
3, 1844; and Hannah is the wife of Timothy 
Bullard, of Millis. 

Francis Oliver Phillips attended school in 
his native town. When a young man he 
learned the wheelwright's trade; and he sub- 
sequently worked in Sherborn, Mass., for a 
year. With this exception he has always re- 
sided at the homestead, and followed his trade 
in Millis. In 1854 he took charge of the 
farm, relieving his father of all care during 
his declining years, and succeeding to the 
farm after the latter's death. His property 
consists of the homestead, containing eigh- 
teen acres, with other land amounting to forty- 
five acres. The Phillips farm is one of the 
oldest pieces of agricultural property in 
Millis. The barn was built in 1740. Besides 
carriage-making, Mr. Phillips carries on gen- 
eral farming. 

In April, 1854, Mr. Phillips was united in 
marriage with Mercy P. Adams, who was born 
in this town, August 26, 1834. She is a 
daughter of Edward and Keziah L. (Clark) 
Adams, of whom an account will be found in 
the biography of Moses S. Adams. Mrs. 
Phillips has been the mother of two children. 
They were: Edward Adams, born in January, 
1856, who resides with his parents; and Mary 
Frances, born in i860, who married Stuart 
McLee, of East Walpole, Mass., and died at 
the age of twenty-one years. Mr. Phillips is 
independent in politics. He is a member of 
Medway Lodge, No. 163, L O. O. F. Both 
he and Mrs. Phillips attend the Congrega- 
tional church. 



ENJAMIN F. SHUMWAY, the sec- 
V ond Selectman of Medfield, and a 
I f^ ' prosperous farmer, was born in 
Dover, this county, March 23, 1823. 
He is a son of John and Abigail (Wight) 
Shumway, and a grandson of Jeremiah Shum- 




way and Amos Wight. The father was a na- 
tive of Pomfret, Conn., whence he came to 
Norfolk County about the year 1803, and 
worked for several years as hostler in a hotel 
in Medfield. After his marriage he settled in 
Dover, and took up farming, which he fol- 
lowed until his death in 1844. His wife, 
Abigail, was born in Medfield. She survived 
him thirty years, dying in 1874. John and 
Abigail Shumway were the parents of ten 
children, namely: Abigail, who died in the 
same year as her father; Itlizabeth, deceased; 
Amos W. , who died in 1892; Jolin, who died 
in i8gi ; Benjamin F., the subject of this 
sketch; George, who successively married 
Mary Bickford, of Sherborn, Mass., and Ida 
May Rogers, and now resides in Medfield 
village; Elbridge, a resident of Norwood, 
Mass.; William and Louisa, deceased; and 
Sarah E., the wife of Benjamin N. Sawin, 
of Dover. 

Benjamin F. Shumway received a conmion- 
school education. He lived at home until 
1839, when at the age of sixteen he started for 
himself on the farm which he now occupies. 
The estate contains one hundred and fifty 
acres of excellent farm land. He keeps a 
dairy of twenty cows, from which he sells the 
milk for Boston consumers. On November 
26, 1846, he married Miss Lucy A. Cutler, of 
Medfield. She was born F"ebruary 18, 1827, 
daughter of Oliver and Lucy (P"airbanks) 
Cutler, and grand-daughter of Oliver and 
Nancy (Harding) Cutler. Her grandparents 
were lifelong residents of Medfield. Oliver 
Cutler, Jr., was born here, P^ebruary 22, 1797. 
Both he and his father were engaged in farm- 
ing on the same place. He died in Septem- 
ber, 1864, aged sixty-seven years, survived by 
Lucy, his wife, whose death occurred Febru- 
ary 7, 1 88 1, in her ninetieth year. She was 
born in Needham, Mass. They had six chil- 
dren—Charles C, Mary B., Alfred and Al- 
bert (twins), Lucy A., and Caroline A. 
Charles C, now deceased, born September 14, 
1820, married Cynthia Randall, and had one 
child, Cynthia C, who is now the widow of 
William B. Marchant, and lives in Brooklyn, 
N.Y. Mary B., born April 3, 1822, married 
George Dunham, and died April 13, 1853, 
leaving one child, George O., who is now in 



304 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Michigan. Alfred and Albert were born 
June 13, 1824. Albert died March 21, 1845. 
Alfred, now living in Medficld, married Ade- 
line Spencer, who has since died. Their son, 
Lewis A., married Miss Thursa F"leming, and 
has one child, Archie E. Caroline A., born 
January 13, 1830, died February 21, 187S. 
She was the wife of John Baldwin, who is in 
the white lead business in Chicago, 111. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shumway have had three chil- 
dren : Nathan Wight, born January 3, 1848, 
who is emjiloyed in a net and twine factory in 
Cambridge, Mass.; Benjamin F., Jr., born 
February 10, 1850, who died March 15, 1S50; 
and Albert Cutler, born October 17, 1851, 
now a pattern-maker in Pawtucket, R.I., who 
married March 30, 1876, Miss Kate E. 
Wetherell, of Providence, R.I., where they 
lived for twenty years. 

In politics Mr. Shumway is a Democrat. 
He has been a member of the Board of Select- 
men for twenty-four years, a part of the time 
serving as chairman, an Assessor for about 
twelve years, Overseer of the Poor for ten 
years, and a member of the School Committee 
for one year. 



M 



AVID CARPENTER, a lifelong and 
esteemed resident of Fo.xboro, was 
born here, January 6, 1S30. A son 
of Ezra Carpenter, Jr., he is a 
lineal descendant of William Carpenter, a na- 
tive of England, who came to America in 
early Colonial times, and died at Weymouth, 
Mass., in 1659. (Further information con- 
cerning Mr. Carpenter's early ancestors will 
be found in the biography of Robert W. Car- 
penter.) Nehemiah Carpenter, the great- 
grandfather of David, who was born October 
20, 1 73 1, moved to Foxboro in 1749, after- 
ward living here until his death on May 14, 
1799. 

Ezra Carpenter, son of Nehemiah and the 
grandfather of David, born in Foxboro in 
1752, died in this town, July i, 1840. He 
was a farmer by occupation. Soon after 
reaching man's estate, he bought land situated 
about one mile south of the parental home- 
stead, and there improved one of the most val- 
uable farms in the locality. He was a Lieu- 



tenant of a company in the Revolutionary 
War. Lieutenant Carpenter first married 
Margaret Daniels, who died a few years later, 
leaving three children. He subsequently 
married Mary Daniels, who bore him five chil- 
dren, all of whom lived to a good old age. 
They were: Francis, who attained the age of 
eighty-eight years; Polly, who was ninety-two 
years; Daniels, who was eighty-five; Ezra, 
Jr., who was seventy; and Achsa, who was 
eighty-four years. Ezra Carpenter, Jr., born 
in this town, November 7, 1801, died on the 
parental homestead, December 25, 1871. He 
assisted his father in the pioneer labor of 
clearing the land, cared for his parents in 
their old age, and at their death succeeded to 
the home farm. Possessing good judgment 
and much force of character, he was looked up 
to for leadership by the community. He 
served as Selectman for several years, was also 
a member of the State legislature, and his 
name appeared oftener than that of any other 
person as an administrator of estates. He 
married Eliza Belcher, a daughter of Samuel 
Belcher; and they reared three children — 
Susan, Eliza, and David. Susan is the wife 
of James A. Comey, of this town. Eliza first 
married Henry Belcher, who died in 1862. 
Afterward she became the wife of Cyrus L. 
Cook. 

David Carpenter obtained his early educa- 
tion in the district school, where he was an 
apt pupil. Subsequently he worked as a 
moulder in an iron foundry for a time; but, 
not liking the trade, he abandoned it, and en- 
tered the employment of the Union Straw 
Works. In this factory he spent thirty years, 
serving in different positions of responsibil- 
ity. For the past twenty-four years Mr. Car- 
penter has had charge of Rock Hill Cemetery. 
The handsome mortuary chapel connected 
therewith was erected under his supervision. 
When a young man he built a house for him- 
self and family, not far from the home of his 
youth, but subsequently removed to the dwell- 
ing he now occupies. He is a great lover of 
nature in all its forms, and takes great delight 
in the cultivation of flowers. He is also fond 
of reading, and has collected a valuable library 
of choice literature, with which he regales his 
leisure hours. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



305 



On May 27, 1849, Mr. Carpenter married 
Miss Mary Davis, of Pittston, Me. They have 
two children — Sanford Irving and Mary E. 
Mr. Carpenter has persistently advocated the 
principles of the Republican party since its 
formation. In 1852 he cast his first Presi- 
dential vote for Franklin Pierce. He is in- 
terested in all things pertaining to the educa- 
tional and literary advancement of the town, 
and for a quarter of a century has been a trus- 
tee of the public library. He belongs to the 
Knights of Honor, and is a consistent mem- 
ber of the Universal ist church. 



22 



JEREMIAH B. HALP:, a well-known 
fire insurance agent, who was at one 
time the Postmaster of Medfield, Mass., 
was born in Smithfield, R.I., P^ebruary 
1830, son of Gardner and Ann .Susan 
(Ballon) Hale. The grandfather, Levi Hale, 
who resided in Swansea, Mass., was a cooper 
by trade. His children, all now deceased, 
were: Pllizabeth, Anthony, Levi, Hannah, 
Edward, Elmira, Gardner, William, Cordelia, 
and ]5etsey. 

Gardner Hale, who was born in Swansea, 
at an early age left home to start in life for 
himself. He worked in cotton factories of 
various towns in Rhode Island and Massachu- 
setts, and became an e.xpert in the cotton in- 
dustry. In 1849 he went as superintendent of 
a factory to Prattville, Ala., where he resided 
during the ensuing ten years. He built two 
mills in Alabama, where the rest of his life 
was spent, having his residence in the vicinity 
of Birmingham. He died in September, 1886. 
His wife, Ann Susan, who was a native of 
Cumberland, R.I., became the mother of 
eleven children. These were: Jeremiah B., 
the subject of this sketch; Hannah, who is 
the widow of Thomas Williams, and resides 
in Alabama; Susan, who is the widow of Pro- 
fessor J. F. Tarrant, and is now a school 
teacher in Montgomery, Ala. ; George, who 
died in 1887; Emily and Emeline, twins, who 
are also deceased; Henry A., who was an edi- 
tor, and died in Birmingham, Ala. ; Charles, 
who died young; Anna, who is the widow of 
Foster Terrill, and resides in Birmingham; 
Daniel, also a resident of that city; and Eliza, 



who married William Morgan, and resides in 
Dadeville, Ala. Mrs. Gardner Hale w^as a 
lady of superior intelligence, and occupied a 
prominent social position. .She died very 
suddenly of cholera in 1870. 

Jeremiah B. Hale was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Massachusetts, and resided at 
home until he was nineteen years old. He 
became an operative in a cotton-mill, and 
later accompanied his father to Alabama, 
where he was an overseer in a factory of Pratt- 
ville for three and one-half years. Then he 
returned North, and worked in a straw factory 
of P'o.xboro, Mass., for five years. During the 
succeeding four years he carried on the straw 
business for Alden, King & Co. , in Middleboro, 
Mass., after which he returned to his previous 
position in P"o.\boro, where he continued to 
reside for three years. After this he came to 
Medfield, and engaged in the straw and palm 
leaf business in company with Warren Chen- 
ery. A year later he purchased the machinery 
from Mr. Chenery, and three years from then 
his interest in the business. The sole propri- 
etor thereafter, he had carried on a flourishing 
enterprise for several years, when, in 1876, 
the factory was destroyed by fire. Appointed 
the Postmaster of Medfield in 1880, he filled 
that office until 1889, when he became the 
superintendent and general manager of the 
straw factory of Searle, Dai ley & Co. This 
position he held cmtil 1S96, when he retired. 
He has been engaged in the fire insurance 
business since 1873, and for some years has 
been the local agent for the Home, the West- 
chester, Hartford, the Citizens", Middlesex, 
Merchants' and Farmers', the Norfolk, the 
Dedham, and the Abington Fire Insurance 
Companies. 

Mr. Hale, who has been three times mar- 
ried, was first wedded in 1849 to Eliza A. 
Grover. A native of Mansfield, iVIass., she 
was a daughter of William and Betsey Grover, 
prosperous farming people of that town, both 
of whom are now deceased. Mrs. Eliza Hale 
died in Alabama in 1851; and in June, 1852, 
Mr. Hale contracted his second marriage with 
Mary J. Plimpton, a daughter of George and 
Mary (Tolman) Plimpton, who were lifelong 
residents of Sharon, Mass. His second wife 
having died in 1887, he married her sister, 



3o6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Josephine E. Plimpton, in August, 1889. 
Born of his first union were two children — ■ 
William and Eliza — both of whom died 
young. His second wife was the mother of 
four children, namely: Merton, who did not 
live to grow up; Clarence, who died at the 
age of two years; Lillian, who married Dr. 
C. E. Bigelow, of Leominster, Mass., and has 
had two children, one of whom is living; and 
Charles, who was accidentally drowned at the 
age of twenty years. Mr. Hale has been Se- 
lectman, Assessor, Town Clerk, and Overseer 
of the Poor, and was a member of the School 
Board for nine years. He is still acting as a 
Justice of the Peace, and is a member of the 
Cemetery Committee. In politics he sup- 
ports the Republican party, and he has been 
a delegate to several State conventions. He 
is one of the best informed men upon current 
topics in Medfield, and is held in high esteem 
by all who know him. Both he and Mrs. Hale 
are members of the Baptist church. 



^Crr)/ARREN H. BRIGHT, a well- 
Y(jA/ known farmer and lumber dealer of 
Vs V> Franklin, was born in Canton, this 
county, August 4, 1842, son of Michael and 
Elvira (Richards) Bright. Michael Bright, 
who was born in Natick, Mass., was engaged 
in farming in Canton for some time, and then 
removed to Sharon. In 1871 he came to 
Franklin, where he made his home with his 
son Warren, until his death in April, 1879. 
The mother died in Sharon in 1862. Her 
other children were: Samuel, the first-born, 
now in California; Mary, who is the wife of 
William Mann, and lives in Franklin; Eliza- 
beth, who is the widow of John Metcalf, and 
lives in Franklin; Thomas, who died in 1895; 
Daniel, who died during the war at New Or- 
leans; Edwin, who lives in Attleboro, Mass., 
engaged in the jewelry business; Frederick, 
who is a farmer, and resides at F"ranklin vil- 
lage; Willard, who is living near Warren H. 
Bright; Charles, who resides in Franklin, and 
is employed in the straw shop; and Sarah, 
Elizabeth, and Abbie, deceased. 

Warren H. Bright received a common- 
school education. At the age of twenty-one 
years he obtained a position in the Lothrop 



Knife Shop in Sharon, Mass., and worked 
there for about a year. At the end of that 
time he enlisted for service in the Civil War 
in the Eleventh Massachusetts Battery. He 
was subsequently in the battle of the Wilder- 
ness at Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold 
Harbor, and at the siege of Petersburg, with- 
out receiving an injury in any way. After he 
was discharged at Readville, Mass., he re- 
turned to Sharon. Subsequently he went to 
Avon, where he engaged in farming near a 
sister living there. At the end of five years 
he came to Franklin, settling near the village, 
and there, besides farming, engaged in the 
lumber business, buying wood lots, and cut- 
ting wood and lumber. He owns, in addition 
to the home farm containing fifty-five acres, 
two others of sixty-five and forty acres respec- 
tively, and about eighty-five acres of sprout 
land. He has much improved the land since 
it came into his possession. 

In 1866 Mr. Bright was married to Mary 
Peary, of Avon, a daughter of Stephen and 
Susan (Rowe) Peary. Mr. Peary is a well- 
known farmer and lumberman of Avon, and 
resides there at the present time witii his 
wife. Mrs. Bright died in December, 1886. 
Her children were: Edna, now teaching in 
the seminary at Montpelier, Vt. ; Susan, the 
wife of Roy Conant Southworth, living at 
Ware, Mass. ; Annie Belle, a teacher in the 
public schools, residing at home; Elvira, 
now Mrs. Frank Ribero, of Chelsea, Mass. ; 
Henry James and Harry, both living at home; 
and Ina and Mabel, both of whom died young. 
Mr. Bright married for his second wife Agnes 
M. Trask, a native of Yarmouth, N.S. She 
was born P"ebruary 10, 1864, daughter of 
Henry G. and Rebecca (Crosby) Trask, both 
natives of Yarmouth. The father, who was 
a farmer, is now deceased; and the mother 
lives in Mijford with her children. By Mr. 
Bright's second marriage there is one child, 
Carl Aubrey, born December 12, 1892. Mr. 
Bright's older children attended the high 
school and the academy. In politics he is 
a Republican. He was Overseer of the Poor 
in Franklin for nine years, and was Assessor 
of the town in 1895. He belongs to the 
I. O. O. F. of Franklin and to Post 60, 
G. A. R. While he is a member of the Bap- 




FREEMAN A. PARMENTER. 



BIOGRAPHICAL RKVIEW 



309 



tist denomination, he and his family attend 
the Methodist Episcopal church in Franklin. 
His success in the world is chiefly due to his 
tireless industry. 



'REEMAN A. PARMENTER, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Assessors of Dover, 
was born in Bolton, Mass., August 31, 
1849, son of Curtis and Mary (Dwinells) 
Parmenter. The father, who was a native of 
P'ramingham, Mass., followed the shoemaker's 
trade. He possessed considerable musical 
ability, and, after settling in Bolton after his 
marriage, he taught music there for some time. 
Later in Sudbury, Mass., he continued to 
give music lessons, and worked at his trade 
for some three years. Then returning to 
Framingham, he was there engaged in team- 
ing and the work of a stone-mason until his 
death, which occurred July 3, 1884. Pi is 
wife, Mary, who is a native of Massachusetts, 
became the mother of seven children, as fol- 
lows: Freeman A., the subject of this sketch; 
George, who married Delia Dickey, and is a 
confectionery dealer in South P"ramingham; 
Mary, who resides in Worcester, Mass.; 
Charles, who married Jennie Robinson, and 
lives in South Framingham, Mass.; Estella 
v., the wife of Elijah Goulding, of Wellesley, 
Mass. , Ellsworth L., a travelling salesman, 
who married Alice Burbidge, and resides in 
South Framingham; and Sarah R., who is the 
widow of Joseph Smith, and lives in Welles- 
ley. Mrs. Mary Parmenter is still living, and 
resides with her children. 

Freeman A. Parmenter was reared in Fram- 
ingham, receiving his education in the com- 
mon schools. Beginning at the age of nine- 
teen, he worked as a stone-mason for a few 
years. In 1873 he went to Sudbury, where 
he had charge of the famous Wayside Inn for 
a year. He then settled upon the old Gould- 
ing farm in Dover, where he has since resided. 
He owns eighty acres of fertile land, which he 
devotes to general farming and pasturage. He 
keeps an average of twenty-eight cows, and 
supplies a large number of regular customers 
in Wellesley with milk. 

On November 27, 1873, Mr. Parmenter was 
united in marriage with Lucy E. Goulding. 



She was born in Dover, November 11, 1852, 
daughter of Henry and H. limelinc (Edward.s) 
Goulding. Henry Goulding, who was a na- 
tive of Sherborn, Mass., settled upon the 
farm in Dover after his marriage, and was 
there engaged in agriculture until his death, 
which was caused by an accident on July 16, 
1884. His wife, who was born in Lincoln, 
Mass., died January 14, 1883. Mr. Parmen- 
tcr's first wife died November i, 1886. On 
October 10, 1888, he wedded her sister, Ma- 
tilda Goulding, who was born Maixh 15, 1847. 
The children of the first marriage were: 
George F., born March 26, 1877, who is now 
a student at Amherst College; Elmer Henry, 
born November 27, i88i ; and Lucy M., born 
March 22, 1886, who died May 30, 1893. 
The present Mrs. Parmenter has one son, 
Ernest B., born March 15, 1892. In politics 
Mr. Parmenter acts with the Republican 
party, and has served as an Assessor for the 
past four years. His long-continued industry 
has been attended with good results finan- 
cially, and as an able and progressive farmer 
he ranks among the leading agriculturists of 
this town. Both he and Mrs. Parmenter are 
attendants and members of the Baptist church 
in Medfield. 



OHN T. MELLUS, the proprietor of 
the Wellesley Steam Laundry, was 
born in South Braintree in 1855. His 
father, Joseph Melius, who was born 
May 30, 1809, after spending a number of 
years in the express business at South lirain- 
tree, became a newsdealer in the Old Colony 
depot. On November 26, 183 1, Joseph mar- 
ried Adeline M., daughter of F^dward M. Vin- 
ton. Mrs. Melius belongs to the seventh 
generation of Vintons in this country. Her 
first ancestor concerning whom anything is 
known was born in Europe, probably in 
France, in 1620. In 1648, when his first 
child was born, he was living in Lynn, Mass. 
Joseph Melius was the father of eight chil- 
dren, four of whom are now living. These 
are: Adeline Elizabeth, who married Thomas 
Fallon, and resides in Ro.xbury, Mass.; Lucy 
Preston, who married Edward Hunt, and re- 
sides in Rockland, Mass.; Eliza Ann, who 



310 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



married D. F. Morse, and is now living in 
Brookline, Mass.; and John T., the subject 
of this slvctch. 

John T. Melius was educated in the graded 
schools and high school of South Braintree. 
After leaving school he worked in a shoe shop 
in South Hraintree. In 1883 he came to 
Wellesley, and worked at the same business 
for two years. Then he went to work in a 
laundry for Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Morse, and 
was soon made foreman, a position that he 
held four years. Upon the death of Mr. 
Morse in i8go, he bought a share in the busi- 
ness, and ran it for a year and a half in part- 
nership with Leonard T. Morse. At the end 
of that time he bought out the business, and 
has since conducted it alone. Mr. Melius has 
made many improvements in his laundry, and 
the work is now done with the best of modern 
appliances. He runs two wagons, and has 
patrons in Wellesley, Newton, Auburndale, 
and Newtonville. Mr. Melius is a member of 
Sincerity Lodge, No. 173, I. O. O. F., at 
Wellesley, having transferred his member- 
ship in 1896 from Puritan Lodge, No. 179, 
South Braintree. He is also a member of the 
Nahanton Tribe of Red Men, No. 81, at 
South Braintree. 



'OHN BULLARD, of Millis, a thriving 
farmer and the representative of an old 
family in this section, was born here, 
December 7, 1823, son of John and 
Chloe (Partridge) Bullard. His great-grand- 
father, Timothy Bullard, settled in the north- 
ern part of the town, upon land which he con- 
verted into a good farm, and which has been 
in the family's possession for three genera- 
tions. The grandfather, Ralph Bullard, re- 
sided at the homestead. The father, who 
succeeded to the home farm, thereafter occu- 
pied it until his death, which occurred Sep- 
tember 27, 1875. His wife, Chloe, who was 
a native of Medway, died April 13, 1861. By 
him she was the mother of three children, 
namely: Timothy, born November 20, 18 16, 
who married Hannah Phillips, and resides in 
Millis; Rhoda, born in February, 18 19, who 
died October i, 1S20; and John, the subject 
of this sketch. 



John Bullard acquired a common-school ed- 
ucation. From an early age he assisted in 
carrying on the farm, remaining on it until he 
was fifty years old. He then bought the old 
Daniels farm, formerly the property of his 
wife's father, and now owns seventy-five acres 
of well-improved land, which he devotes to 
general farming. By the exercise of good 
judgment and a practical knowledge of agri- 
culture he has reached a position of comfort- 
able prosperity, and is regarded as one of the 
prominent and successful farmers of this 
locality. 

On May 21, 1845, Mr. Bullard married 
Pearllee Daniels, who was born in this town, 
July 29, 1823. She is a daughter of Paul and 
Eliza (Breck) Daniels, who were natives re- 
spectively of Millis and Sherborn, Mass. 
Her father, one of the stirring farmers of his 
day, died here, P'ebruary 15, 1876; and her 
mother died June 16, 1885. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bullard have had four children, namely: 
Harriet P., born October 20, 1846; Lewella, 
born November 4, 1849; Sewell, born ]\Iarch 
21, 1851; and Joseph D., born September 16, 
1855. Harriet P. is the second wife of Lewis 
La Croix, a Selectman and the Town Clerk of 
Millis. They reside with her father, and 
have two children — Lewis B. and Chester. 
Lewella, who died March 13, 1880, was the 
first wife of Lewis La Croix. Sewell H., 
who is a fruit-grower in Waldo, Fla., wedded 
Marion J. Daniels. Joseph D. wedded Mary 
Emma Follansbee, and is an employee of the 
Old Colony Railroad Company in Framing- 
ham, Mass. In politics Mr. Bullard, Sr., 
supports the Republican party. Mrs. Bullard 
is a member of the Congregational church. 




ILLIAM H. WADE, a retired jew- 
eller of Wrentham, Mass., was born 
in this town, Norfolk County, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1840. His parents were RIarshall 
S. and Elizabeth (Hunt) Wade. His pater- 
nal grandfather, Lewis Wade, was born in 
Rehoboth, Mass., in 1766, and was a black- 
smith by trade. He married Rebecca Peck, 
who was born August 19, 1765. 

Their son, Marshall S. Wade, born in 
March, 1798, was a native of Rehoboth. He 




WILLIAM H, WADE. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



313 



was a reed-maker by trade, but he also learned 
the business of cabinet-making, to which he 
gave some attention, and besides that he did 
house painting to some extent. He came to 
Wrcntham when eighteen years of age, and 
settled at the place where he lived for the re- 
mainder of his life. For his first wife he 
married Miranda Cobb. The fruit of this 
union was one son, Marshall S., Ji., who 
served in the Thirty-fifth Massachusetts Regi- 
ment during the late war, where he re- 
ceived three wounds, and never fully re- 
covered from them; and a daughter, Miranda 
M., who married L. D. Newell, of Provi- 
dence, R.I., and has one son, Frank W. For 
his second wife Mr. Marshall S. Wade married 
Flizabeth Hunt, by whom he had five chil- 
dren, as follows: Caroline E. ; Lydia F. ; 
Mary R., who died young; William H., the 
subject of this sketch; and Frank, who died 
in infancy. Mr. Wade married for his third 
wife Azubah Parmenter Russell, but had no 
children by that marriage. " He died Sep- 
tember 26, iSSi . 

William H. Wade, the subject of this 
sketch, was educated in the district schools of 
the town and at Day's Academy. At the age 
of fifteen years he left home, and started for 
himself in Boston, working in the office of the 
Traveller, one of the prominent daily papers 
of that city. He afterward went to North 
Attleboro, Mass., where he was employed in 
the store of W. D. Cotton & Co. ; and, remain- 
ing with that firm until its dissolution, he 
continued with its successors, R. Knapp & 
Holmes, for three years. He afterward be- 
came book-keeper for Freeman Brothers & 
Co., of Attleboro, and remained with them 
imtil the war broke out. He enlisted in 
Company I, Seventh Massachusetts Regiment, 
was soon appointed Sergeant, and afterward 
at the battle of Fair Oaks was made First 
Sergeant. Later he was made Second Lieu- 
tenant of Company D, and commanded that 
company at Fredericksburg. Promoted to be 
First Lieutenant, May 14, 1863, he was in 
active service in all of the battles up to 
Gettysburg; and soon after this he was put on 
detached service at Long Island, Boston Har- 
bor, where he remained until February, 1864. 
He subsequently returned to active service in 



the field, and was with his regiment in 1864 
during Grant's campaign. In June, 1864, 
his term expired; but he returned to the army 
in the commissary's department in the Twenty- 
fifth Corps, when it went to Te.xas from Vir- 
ginia in 1865, and was on duty there until 
May, 1868. He then purchased a farm in 
Eyota, Minn., and cleared the land, building 
a small house, where he and his sister lived 
until November, 1870, when he sold it, and 
came East. He went to Attleboro, Mass., 
and engaged in book-keeping for a period of 
six years. In 1876 he started in the jewelry 
business at Plainville, where he continued 
until 1890, when the firm changed, he remain- 
ing with the new firm until 1S96, and then 
retiring from active mercantile life. He has 
since purchased a farm of twenty-five acres in 
Wrentham, on which he now lives. 

Mr. Wade married Flizabeth N. Sherman, 
daughter of George B. Sherman, of Wrentham, 
Mass. They have no children. Mr. Wade is 
one of the most prominent and influential cit- 
izens of the town. He has served as Repre- 
sentative to the legislature, .Selectman, High- 
way Surveyor, Assessor, and Auditor. He is 
a charter member of the local G. A. R. Post, 
and also of Post No. 145, of Attleboro, and was 
one of the organizers of Post No. 133 of Plain- 
ville, of which he was first Commander. This 
position he has held with slight intermissions 
for the larger part of the time up to the pres- 
ent. He was also Commander of the Attle- 
boro Post. He has been a St. Albans Mason 
since 1863. In 1886 he became a member of 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen, No. 
57, of Wrentham. He is also connected with 
the American Benefit .Society, of which he is 
at present State president, being a charter 
member. In his political views Mr. Wade is 
a Republican, and cast his first Presidential 
vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. 



KRANCIS A. BRAGG, M.D., a skilful 
physician of Foxboro, Mass., where he 
has been located since 1895, was born 
January 2, 1865, in Shutesbury, Franklin 
County. A son of Henry O. Bragg, he comes 
of excellent New England ancestry. 

Henry O. Bragg was born in Royalston, 



;i4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mass., where he was brought up to agricult- 
ural pursuits. He subsequently carried on 
farming for a time successively in Shutesbury 
and Amherst. In 1895 he removed to this 
town, and has since lived retired from active 
business cares. He married Miss Jemima 
Shores, a direct descendant of Peregrine 
White, who, born to William and Susanna 
White in Provincetown Harbor soon after the 
arrival of the Pilgrims in America, is said to 
have been the first white child to receive birth 
in the New World. Of Henry O. Bragg's 
children — three boys and two girls — the 
daughters are both dead. The sons are: 
Everett B., a manufactilring chemist in Cleve- 
land, Ohio; William T., of Springfield, 
Mass.; and Francis A., the subject of this 
sketch. 

After graduating from Amherst High 
School, Francis A. Bragg attended the Har- 
vard Medical School, from which he received 
his degree with the class of 1894. He began 
the practice of medicine in Boston, Mass., re- 
maining there for a time. In 1895 he came 
to Fo.xboro, where he has since followed his 
profession. He has won a fair share of prac- 
tice in this and surrounding towns, and he is 
rapidly gaining the confidence of the commu- 
nity. The Doctor is a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society, of the Boston Medi- 
cal Association, and of the American Medical 
Association. He is also an Odd Fellow, 
belonging to E.xcelsior Lodge, No. 87, of 
Foxboro. In politics he is a steadfast Re- 
publican. He is a regular attendant of the 
Congregational church of Foxboro, with 
which he joined by letter. With his natural 
ability, scholarly attainments, and profes- 
sional skill, it is easy to predict a successful 
future for him. 




jHARLES O. GREENE, a prosperous 
farmer of Norfolk and a Civil War 
veteran, was born August 27, 1844, 
in Bristol, Addison County, Vt., 
son of Squire and Rhoda (Rathburn) Greene. 
The father, a native of Weare, N. H., when 
twelve years old accompanied his parents to 
Bristol. When a young man. Squire Greene 
engaged in farming and teaming. After re- 



siding in Bristol until 1863, he moved to a 
farm in Marquette, Wis., where he died in 
1865. His wife, Rhoda, who was a native of 
Bristol, became the mother of six children, as 
follows: George N. and Asa R., both of whom 
are retired farmers in West Concord, Minn. ; 
Charles O., the subject of this sketch; Alfa- 
rette, the wife of John Steen, a merchant and 
stock-raiser in Waltham, Minn.; David S., a 
prosperous farmer in Palmer, S. Dak. ; and 
Liena, the wife of George Ralph, a tobacco 
and cigar dealer in West Superior, Wis. The 
mother died in Bristol in 1854. 

After attending the common schools of his 
native town for a brief period, Charles O. 
Greene at the age of ten years began to work 
for the neighboring farmers. He left Ver- 
mont in March, 1861, and on September 27, 
1862, he enlisted in the First Rhode Island 
Cavalry, under Colonel Dupee and Captain 
Willis Capron. In the following October 
the regiment was sent to Montville, Va. At 
Kelley's Ford on March 17, 1863, it lost 
forty men. On the same occasion Mr. Greene 
was taken prisoner, but succeeded in making 
his escape the same night. At the battle of 
Middleboro, June 17, 1863, his regiment lost 
over three hundred men, leaving but fifty-two 
of its original quota. His next engagement 
was at Boonsboro, Md., after which the regi- 
ment took an active part in all the engage- 
ments from that of Gettysburg to that of the 
Rapidan River. On January i, 1864, he was 
transferred to the First New Hampshire 
Regiment, in which later he re-enlisted, and 
served under General Grant at Cold Harbor, 
Spottsylvania, and Petersburg. At one time 
his regiment was kept marching for forty days 
and nights, with but few intervals for sleep. 
It lost heavily in Wilson's Raid; and, after 
being somewhat recruited, it was ordered to 
the Shenandoah Valley under General Sheri- 
dan. At Fisher's Hill, September 9, 1864, 
Mr. Greene received a gunshot wound in the 
right shoulder that put an end to his active 
service. After being confined by it in sev- 
eral hospitals, he was discharged at Chestnut 
Hill, near Philadelphia, in May, 1865. Dur- 
ing the year following the close of the war he 
resided in Providence, R.I.; and the succeed- 
ing two years were spent in farming in Smith- 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3'S 



field, R.I. In 1868 he went to San Mateo, 
Cal., and was there employed upon a large 
.stock ranch for si.x years, after which he was 
engaged in keeping a summer resort at Seig- 
ler's Springs until October, 1876. Then he 
returned East, and resided for a year in Woon- 
socket, R.I. For some time he was engaged 
in farming and staging in Gloucester, R.I., 
resided in Greenville for one year, and in 
1S84 settled upon his present farm in Nor- 
folk. He owns about one hundred and thirty 
acres of e.\cellent land, well adapted to gen- 
eral farming and dairying, on which he has 
made various improvements. The industrious 
habits acquired by him in his early boyhood 
have never been allowed to deteriorate, and 
since the war have kept him constantly busy. 
In politics he is a Republican. He has 
served as Road Commissioner si.x years, and 
he was upon the School Board four years. 

On March 25, 1866, Mr. Greene was united 
in marriage with Emily Harris, born in 
Smithfield, R.I., September 6, 1845. She is 
a daughter of Hezekiah S. and Susan M. 
(Sawyer) Harris, the former of whom was a 
native of Lyndon, Vt., and the latter of Provi- 
dence. Mr. Harris was for many years en- 
gaged in the cigar manufacturing business and 
in general mercantile pursuits, and was also 
a well-known horseman and farmer. Now 
seventy-seven years old, he resides upon his 
farm in Smithfield. His wife died November 
12, 1879. Ml"- 3">J ^""S- Greene have had 
three children, namely: Charles E. and 
Austin E., twins, who were born in San 
Mateo, Cal., April 20, 1872; and Frank H., 
born December 31, 1876, who died September 
9, 1893. Charles E. resides in Providence, 
R.I. Austin E., who lives with his parents, 
married Rose F. Whiting, of Norfolk, and has 
two children — ^ Everett W. and Malcolm H. 
Mr. Greene is a comrade of Franklin Post, 
No. 60, G. A. R. Both he and Mrs. Greene 
attend the Universalist church. 




I D WARD MOFFETTE, the manager of 
the Dedham Lumber Company at Ded- 
ham, Mass., is carrying on an exten- 
sive lumber and coal business in partnership 
with his brother, Robert J. Moffette. He 



was born August 8, 1849, '" Boston, Mass., a 
son of George A. Moffette. He is of English 
ancestry, his great-grandfather, Edward Mof- 
fette, having been born and reared in P^ngland. 
This ancestor spent some years of his life in 
Quebec, Canada, as a government official, al- 
though he returned to his native land, and 
died there. 

George Moffette, the grandfather, was born 
in Quebec, where he spent his brief life. He 
was accidentally killed by being thrown from 
a horse when but little more than twenty-four 
years old. At his death he left his young 
wife with four small children. George A. 
Moffette, who was born in Quebec, spent a 
large part of his seventy-one years of life in 
Boston, where his death occurred in 1893. 
From 1848 until his death he was employed in 
the pianoforte factory of Chickering & Sons, 
for some years in the capacity of superintend- 
ent of the factory. He married Miss Jane 
Turner, who was born in Gibraltar, Spain, 
being the daughter of P^dward Turner, an Eng- 
lish officer, and one of a family of six chil- 
dren. .She became the mother of five children, 
of whom George, Robert J., PIdward, and 
Clarissa are living. Clarissa is the wife of 
F"ranklin P. Bingham. Both parents were 
members of the E])iscopal church. The 
mother died in 1S91, at the age of sixty-eight 
years. 

Edward Moffette obtained his education in 
the Boston public schools, being graduated 
from the English High School. He afterward 
spent some years in his native city, being em- 
ployed as a clerk in various stores. He was 
then appointed to the State Weather Bureau 
at Washington, D.C., where he remained 
until 1889. In that year, in partnership with 
his brother Robert, he established his present 
coal and lumber yard on Mount Vernon Street, 
Dedham, where he has a large stock of all 
kinds of lumber and coal, and has since car- 
ried on a very remunerative business. Enter- 
prising and industrious, he has met with suc- 
cess in his undertakings. 

Mr. Moffette was married October 8, 1890, 
to Miss Mary A. Howard, who was born in 
Cumberland, Md. , where her father, the late 
Henry Howard, was largely interested in coal 
mines. Mr. Howard was born in Salem, 



3i6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Mass., where he resided throughout the most 
of his lifetime, although his business took 
him frequently to Cumberland. He died at 
the age of forty-five years. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary Winchester, and who 
was born in Gloucester, Mass., is the mother 
of six children, Mrs. Moffette being the 
youngest. She is a member of the Episcopal 
church, to which Mr. Howard also belonged. 
Mr. and Mrs. Moffette have four children; 
namely, Thelma, George E., Henry E., and 
Phyllis. Mr. Moffette belongs to Longfellow 
Lodge, Roslindale, L O. O. P., the Royal 
Arcanum, and the Odd Fellows Encampment. 
He is a member of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church of Dedham. 




RLANDO B. CRANE, a prominent 
merchant of Avon, was born here 
when the place was called East 
Stoughton, January 20, 1835. He is 
a son of Ebenezer and Angeline A. (Briggs) 
Crane. The Crane family is one of the old 
families of Avon. Ebenezer Crane, who was 
a boot cutter, died in 1852. The mother's 
death occurred in 1897. 

Orlando B. Crane attended the schools near 
his home when he had an opportunity, obtain- 
ing a fair education. When about fifteen 
years of age, he went to work in a boot factory 
of East Stoughton. Here he learned the 
trade, and was afterward engaged in boot-mak- 
ing for a number of years. When he was 
about twenty years of age, he engaged in the 
express business, running from East Stough- 
ton to Boston. After spending five years at 
that, he manufactured boots for a year and a 
half. In the fall of 1866 he opened a grocery 
store in East Stoughton, which, after conduct- 
ing it for about eight years, he sold in 1874. 
He was subsequently in business in Brockton 
and Canton, Mass. About the year 1882 he 
started in the provision business in East 
Stoughton, subsequently adding groceries, 
hay, and grain to his stock in trade. He is 
now in control of a large and successful busi- 
ness, and his methods are such that he has the 
confidence of all with whom he deals. Suc- 
cessful by his own efforts alone, he is a self- 
made man. 



Mr. Crane was married to Miss Annie .S. 
Kimball, of Bethel, Me. They have five 
children — A. Evaline, Everett C, Harry L., 
Orlando B., and Lester K. Mr. Crane has 
taken a prominent part in local politics, and 
he represented this district in the State leg- 
islature in 1867. 



(^^YDDISON S. SHEPARD, a prominent 
l^\ farmer and dairyman of Franklin, was 
J<i\\ born in Wrentham, this county, 
^~^ May 29, 1829, son of Chickery and 
Relief (Gilmore) Shepard. His paternal 
grandfather and great-grandfather were both 
named John. The father, born in Foxboro, 
was a blacksmith, and worked at his trade in 
Foxboro, Wrentham, and in Walpole. He 
afterward moved to Franklin, and settled on 
the farm where his son Addison now lives, 
dying here in June, 1855. His wife, who was 
a native of Raynham, died in 1868. Their 
other children were: John C. , who died at the 
age of twenty-one; Laura E., the wife of 
Philip S. Sparrow, who is now living in re- 
tirement at West Medway; Louis B. , who 
married Mary Tibbetts, and resides in Fox- 
boro village; Elmira, who is the widow of 
the late Abner D. Sparrow, and lives in 
Calais, Vt. ; Daniel G., .a veteran of the 
G. A. R., living in Boston, who married 
Mary Pond, now deceased; and Eliza A., who 
is the widow of George H. Robinson, and re- 
sides near her brother Addison. 

Addison S. Shepard received his education 
at Day's Academy and in the public schools 
of Wrentham. After the death of his father 
he took charge of the farm, and has lived here 
since, engaged in general farming and dairy- 
ing, and in the raising of poultry and fruit. 
He owns fifty acres of well-improved land. 
In politics he is a Republican. Although he 
may be found at the polls on voting day, he 
has never cared to put himself forward as a 
candidate for ofifice. A member of the Ortho- 
dox Church of Franklin, he is devoted to the 
interests of the society. For twenty-seven 
years he worked in the straw shop. His in- 
dustry and thrift have made him a successful 
man. 

On October 15, 1863, Mr. Shepard was 




ADDISON S. SHEPARD. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3'9 



united in marriage with Mrs. Harriet M. 
Pond Wilson, of Franklin, daughter of 
Hiram and Joanna (Fales) Pond. The father 
was a farmer of this place. Mrs. Shepard 
died January 19, 1889, having been the mother 
of three children. These were: Martha A., 
who died at the age of nine years; and Addie 
May and Louis A., both of whom died in 
childhood. 



fEONARD DRAPER, who is now liv- 
ing in retirement in Dover, repre- 
^ sents an old and highly reputable 
Norfolk County family. He was 
born in Dover, January 6, 1823, son of Moses 
and Maria (Wilbur) Draper. His great- 
grandfather, John Draper, moved his family to 
Dover, and settled in the western part of the 
town. Josiah Draper, grandfather of Leon- 
ard, cleared and improved a farm. 

Moses Draper, after succeeding to the 
farm, cultivated it during the active period 
of his life, and died in 1885. His wife, 
Maria, who was a native of Westmoreland, 
Mass., became the mother of six children — ■ 
Elizabeth, Leonard, Alfreda, Ann Maria, Ann 
Maria (second), and Adeline. Elizabeth is 
now the widow of Albert Mann, and resides 
in Milford, Mass. Both Alfreda and Ann 
Maria (first) died young. Ann Maria (second) 
married Everett Mann, and she and her hus- 
band are no longer living. They were the 
parents of four children — Herbert, Bertha, 
Lester, and another child who did not reach 
maturity. Adeline first married Simon Mc- 
Donald, who died leaving three children ; 
namely, Arthur, Flora, and George. She is 
now the wife of William Schofield, and re- 
sides in Nova Scotia. Mrs. Moses Draper 
died in 1871. 

Leonard Draper attended the common 
schools. When seventeen years old he went 
to Providence for the purpose of learning the 
baker's trade. Soon becoming homesick, he 
returned to Dover, and assisted upon the farm 
for some time. He later learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, which he afterward followed in 
connection with farming until he was fifty 
years old; and he succeeded to the ownership 
of the property after his father's death. He 



remained at the homestead until 1890, when 
he sold the farm. Then, retiring from active 
labor, he has since occupied his present resi- 
dence in the village. 

On October 13, 1846, Mr. Draper was 
united in marriage with Caroline F. Chicker- 
ing. She was born in Dover, February 22, 
1826, daughter of Daniel and Orpha (Bur- 
bank) Chickering. Her father, who was a na- 
tive of Dover, and resided in this town and in 
Medfield, was twice married. By his first 
union, which was with Caroline Lovell, there 
was one son, Cyrus, who is now deceased. 
His second wife, in maidenhood Orpha Bur- 
bank, had three children: James, who is de- 
ceased; Caroline F., who is now Mrs. Draper; 
and Almira, who died at the age of nineteen. 
Li politics Mr. Draper acts with the Republi- 
can party, but could never be induced to ac- 
cept a nomination to any public office. Mrs. 
Draper is a member of the Congregational 
church. 




,HILANDER BATES, a well-known 
boot and shoe merchant of Cohasset, 
Norfolk County, secretary of the Co- 
hasset Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany and an ex-member of the Massachusetts 
legislature, was born in South Weymouth, 
September 16, 1836. His parents were War- 
ren and Harriet N. (Vining) Bates, natives of 
South Weymouth, who moved to Cohasset 
about the year 1840. 

Philander Bates was reared and educated in 
Cohasset; and at the age of nineteen he began 
work in a shoe factory in his native town, 
where he remained some years. In 1861 he 
returned to Cohasset, and opening a retail boot 
and shoe store has carried on the business up 
to the present time. 

In politics he is a Republican, and in 1874 
he was chosen Selectman, Assessor, and Over- 
seer of the Poor. He has held the first two 
offices continuously since that time, having 
been chairman of the Board of Selectmen for 
several years; and with the exception of two 
years he has served as Overseer of the Poor. 
In 1880 he represented Cohasset, Scituate, 
and Norwell in the legislature. In January, 
1895, he was appointed secretary of the Cohas- 



320 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



set Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is 
a Deacon of the Second Congregational 
Church, and for a number of years has been 
superintendent of the Sunday-school. 




)UCIUS W. DANIELS, a leading farmer 
of the town of Franklin, son of Fisher 
and Ann (Fames) Daniels, was born 
April 5, 1839, on the farm where he 
now resides. The homestead was first occu- 
pied by his great-grandfather, David Daniels, 
who came to this town from East Medway ; and 
it has now been in the family one hundred and 
forty years. David's son Joseph, who was 
born on the place, carried on the farm and also 
conducted a country store. His wife was 
Susan Fisher, a native of Franklin. Their 
thirteen children were named as follows; 
Seth, Fisher, Albert E., Hiram, Darwin, 
George, Charles, Julia, Myra, Susan, Martha, 
Harriet, and Caroline. The only survivor is 
Harriet, who is the widow of Mortimer Blake, 
and is living at Hyde Park, Norfolk County, 
with her son. 

Fisher Daniels, the second son of David, as 
the list is here given, took charge of the 
homestead property upon the death of his 
father, and, besides carrying on farming, en- 
gaged in teaching school. He taught at differ- 
ent times in every district in Franklin, and 
was a schoolmaster for over twenty years. He 
always lived at the homestead with the excep- 
tion of about three years, when he was in a 
grocery store in Manchester, N. H., with his 
brothers. He died in Franklin on March 7, 
1874. He was twice married. His first wife, 
Eunice Adams, of Franklin, lived only about 
a year after their marriage. She was the 
mother of one child, a son Waldo, who was a 
schoolmaster and at different times held all 
the town offices, being a very prominent man 
in town. He died in 1886. His wife, for- 
merly Helen R. Gilmore, is now living in 
Franklin. Mrs. Ann Eames Daniels, the sec- 
ond wife of Fisher Daniels, was a native of 
Hopkinton. She died in February, 1876, 
having been the mother of five children; 
namely, J. Wheaton, Eunice Adams, Lucius 
W. , Eunice Ann, and Lucelie Adelaide. J. 
Wheaton Daniels married Hattie King, and is 



now living at Palmyra, N.J. Eunice Adams 
Daniels died at the age of four years, and 
Eunice Ann at the age of two years. Lucelie 
Adelaide is the wife of William Schlesu- 
meyers, a carpenter of West Dedham, now 
Westwood. 

Lucius W. Daniels, after receiving his ele- 
mentary education in the common schools, at- 
tended the Franklin High School and the well- 
known Literary Institution at New Hampton, 
N. H., where he was a student for a year and 
a half. When twenty-one years of age, he 
spent two months in Philadelphia, Pa. With 
that exception he has remained at the home- 
stead. He took care of his parents in their 
declining years, and since coming into posses- 
sion of the estate he has made many improve- 
ments on the place. He owns about two hun- 
dred and fifty acres, and has a fine new set of 
buildings. He carries on some general farm- 
ing and stock-raising, but his main business is 
the marketing of dairy products. He for- 
merly operated a box factory, but has now dis- 
continued that and devotes his time to his 
agricultural interests. 

He has held the office of Assessor for a year 
and that of Selectman of the town for two 
years. In politics he is a Republican, and al- 
ways takes a lively interest in all Republican 
meetings and movements. He is a member of 
the Knights of Honor, of Franklin, and of the 
local grange. He and his wife belong to the 
Congregational church. 

Mr. Daniels was married on September 3, 
1861, to Miss Helen S. Warfield, of Franklin, 
who was born October 23, 1839, a daughter of 
Ebenezer and Sarah (Morse) Warfield, the 
mother a native of Walpole and the father of 
P>anklin. Mr. Warfield was a school-teacher, 
farmer, and trader. He died in Franklin 
when his daughter Sarah was eight years of 
age, and his wife is also deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Daniels have four children — Mary, 
Hattie, Ernest, and Edith. Mary Leola was 
educated in this country, and is now teaching 
in a seminary in Eastern Turkey, where she 
has been engaged for about ten years. Hattie 
Adelia and Edith Nellie are at home with 
their father and mother. Mr. Ernest Darling 
Daniels has been for a number of years the 
popular principal of the Franklin High 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



323 



School. He married Miss Gertrude Goodwin, 
a former classmate in the Bridgewater Normal 
School. 



/^Teorge alonzo southgate, 

I •) I M.D., one of the most successful 
— physicians of Dedham, was born in 
Leicester, Worcester County, Mass., Septem- 
ber 27, 1833, son of Samuel and Charlotte 
Warren (Fuller) Southgate. He is a direct 
descendant of Richard Southgate, a civil en- 
gineer, who, with his wife and five children 
and his brother John, joined a company formed 
in Boston and vicinity in 1718 or 1719, and 
settled at Strawberry Hill, now Leicester, 
Mass. Richard Southgate laid out the town, 
of which he was the first Treasurer, and re- 
ceived a grant of seven hundred and forty acres 
of land. The line of descent comes through 
Richard (second), Isaac, Samuel (first), and 
Samuel (second) to Dr. Southgate, the subject 
of this sketch. 

Samuel Southgate (first). Dr. Southgate's 
grandfather, who was a card manufacturer in 
Leicester, as was also the Doctor's father, died 
in Dedham, June 5, 1876. The family record 
for longevity is somewhat remarkable. The 
first and second Richards were eighty-four 
when they died in Leicester. Isaac died there 
at eighty-one, Samuel (first) died there in 
1859, aged eighty-one, and Samuel (second) 
lived to be seventy. Dr. Southgate's mother 
was born in Easton, Mass., daughter of Rufus 
and Charlotte (Warren) Fuller. The former, 
who was a woollen manufacturer, spent his last 
days in Worcester County, Massachusetts. 
The maiden name of Dr. Southgate's maternal 
great-grandmother was Elizabeth Wheeler. 
His maternal great-great-grandmother was 
Mary Belcher (Bass) Henshaw, whose father, 
Joseph Bass, married Ruth Alden, daughter of 
John Alden and Priscilla Mullins. The Doc- 
tor's mother, who lived to be seventy-five years 
old, had two children, of whom only he reached 
maturity. The other child was Mary Louise, 
born twenty years later than the Doctor, and 
who died when but two and one-half years old. 
George Alonzo Southgate fitted for his col- 
legiate course at the Leicester Academy and 
under the direction of a private tutor. He 



began his professional studies" in the medical 
department of Dartmouth College. Later he 
entered the "University of Benn.sylvania, and 
was graduated with the class of 1859. F'irst 
locating in Millbury, Mass., he remained there 
until 1863. Then he came to Dedham, where 
he has been in successful practice for over 
thirty years. F"or the past three years he has 
had an office at 2 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston. 

(3n June 13, i860, Dr. Southgate was 
united in marriage with Mary Bigelow Will- 
son. She is a daughter of the Rev. Luther 
and Fidelia (Wells) Willson. Her father, 
who was pastor of a Unitarian church in 
Petersham, Mass., for many years, died in 
that town. Mrs. Southgate's parents had a 
family of twelve children, and her brother, the 
Rev. E. B. Willson, was the pastor of a Uni- 
tarian Church at Salem, Mass., for thirty-five 
years. She is the mother of five children, 
namely: Robert Willson, a graduate of Bos- 
ton University Medical School, and asso- 
ciated with his father; Delia Wells, the wife 
of Anson S. Marshall, a lawyer of Concord, 
N.H. ; May Fuller, who married Harry P. 
Cormerias, a business man of Boston, and a 
resident of Dedham ; Walter Bradford, who is 
also in business in Boston ; and Helen Louise, 
a kindergarten teacher. In politics Dr. South- 
gate is a Republican, and he served upon the 
Board of Health for four years. He is a mem- 
ber of Olive Branch Lodge, F. & A. M., of 
Millbury. For many years he was officially 
connected with the Unitarian society, and the 
family attend that church. 




ILLIAM STEARNS, residing on 
Sewell Avenue, Brookline, is prac- 
tically retired from active pursuits, 
although he still pays some attention to vege- 
table gardening. Born August 10, 1830, near 
his present home, he is a son of Marshall 
Stearns, who was- a native of Waltham or 
Weston, Mass. Charles Stearns, the grand- 
father, spent his early life in Waltham, 
whence he came to Brookline in the first years 
of the present century. He purchased land in 
Brookline, and thereafter was engaged in gen- 
eral farminsr and market gardenins; as long as 



324 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



he was able to work. He also purchased a 
house, which is now occupied by one of his 
grandsons, Charles H. Stearns. He spent his 
last days in Brookline, passing away at the 
venerable age of ninety-three years. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Flagg, 
born and bred in Ashby, Mas.s., died in Brook- 
line at the age of fourscore years. They had 
a family of seven children, none of whom are 
now living. Both parents were highly re- 
spected throughout the community, and were 
active members of the Unitarian, or First 
Parish, Church. 

Marshall Stearns succeeded to the owner- 
ship of a portion of the old homestead farm. 
After erecting the house now owned and occu- 
pied by his son William, he made it his per- 
manent residence. He devoted much of his 
time to tilling the soil, meeting with especial 
success in raising early vegetables and fruit for 
the home markets. He took a deep interest in 
the welfare of the town, and served his towns- 
men as Selectman, Assessor, and Overseer of 
the Poor, and was Brookline's Representative 
in the State legislature for two terms. He 
was a Whig in his early years, but after the 
formation of the Republican party was one of 
its firmest adherents. At his death he was 
si.xty-eight years of age. He married Su- 
sanna C. Jones, who was born in Brookline, 
March 5, 1807. -She was one of the two chil- 
dren of Joseph and Hannah (Clark) Jones. 
Joseph Jones, a well-known farmer, died Sep- 
tember 14, 1822, aged forty-nine years; while 
his wife, who was born February 2, 1778, died 
February 28, 1826. Susanna C. Stearns died 
July 26, 1873, aged sixty-six years, leaving 
two children, namely: William, the subject of 
this sketch; and Hannah C, the wife of Will- 
iam J. Swift, formerly of Nantucket, Mass. 
Two other children died in early life. Both 
were connected with the Unitarian church, the 
father having been an ofificial member. 

William Stearns was educated in Brookline, 
attending both the common and high schools, 
and subsequently assisted in the care of the 
home farm, which came into his possession on 
the death of his parents. He afterward en- 
gaged in the real estate business. Having 
divided his land into house lots, he has since 
sold the larger part of it ; and forty or more 



houses occupy the site of his former farm, <jn 
which for so many years he and his father 
raised garden truck. 

Mr. Stearns was married October 6, 1858, 
to Miss Margaret G. Swift. Born in Nan- 
tucket, Mass., she was one of the three chil- 
dren of Henry Swift, who was engaged as a 
whaler in his early life. .She died March 18, 
1869, aged thirty years, having borne her hus- 
band one child — Henry, who lived but four 
years. On October 28, 1874, Mr. Stearns 
married Miss Annie Russell, daughter of 
Thomas V. Russell, a lawyer of St. Lawrence 
County, New York. By this marriage there 
are three children — Elsie R., Marshall, and 
Russell. In politics Mr. Stearns votes for 
the men he deems best qualified for the posi- 
tions to be filled, irrespective of party affilia- 
tions. He is a member of the Brookline 
Club and of the Casino. His religious creed 
is liberal, and he attends the Unitarian 
church. 




ENJAMIN KENRICK, a thriving 
dairy farmer of Dover, was born in 
this town, April 25, 1850, son of 
John and Abigail (Ingalls) Kenrick. 
His grandfather was a native of Newton, Mass. 
The father, who was also born in Newton, fol- 
lowed the trade of blacksmith in that place 
until 1848, when he moved to FJover, and set- 
tled upon the farm which is now owned by his 
son. The rest of his active life was devoted 
to agricultural pursuits; and he died June 2, 
1892. His wife, Abigail, who was a native of 
Fitzwilliam, N.H., became the mother of 
seven children, as follows: Caroline R., born 
November 30, 1842, who died young; Althea, 
born March 2, 1845, who died March 31, 
1893; Mary Caroline, born September 4, 
1848, who died May 8, 1891; Benjamin, the 
subject of this sketch; Luella Gertrude, born 
July 19, 1854, who died December 7, 1875; 
Abbie Ann, born March 8, 1857, who is now 
residing in Dorchester, Mass. ; and Theodocia, 
born June 23, i860, who died March 8, 1863. 
Mrs. John Kenrick died July i, 1888. 

Benjamin Kenrick received his education in 
the common schools of Dover. At the age of 
eighteen he went to Lawrence, Mass., and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



325 



afterward employed in the woollen-mills of 
that city for twenty years. In 1888 he re- 
turned to Dover, and took charge of the home 
farm, which came into his possession after his 
father's death. The property contains one 
hundred and ten acres of fertile land, with new 
and substantial buildings. The land is mainly 
ilevoted to dairy pur[)oses. 

The first of Mr. Kenrick's three marriages 
was contracted on February 9, 1874, with 
Evangeline .St. Clair Archer, of Lawrence. 
Born in Charlotte, Me., daughter of Henry 
Archer, who was a prosperous farmer, she died 
September 25, 1876, leaving one daughter. 
This daughter, Emma May, born June 16, 
1876, died November 2, 1893. Mr. Ken- 
rick's second wife, Charlotte Victoria, was 
born in Maine, daughter of Samuel Scammon, 
who was a lumberman and a farmer. They 
were wedded in Lawrence, June 30, 1881. 
She died September 25, 1887, leaving no chil- 
dren. The third marriage, which was per- 
formed September 9, 1S93, united him to Mrs. 
Margaret Maud (Clark) Webster, who was 
born on Prince Edward Island, May 5, 1859, 
daughter of William and Annie (Ling) Clark, 
both now deceased. Her father, who was an 
Englishman, and who emigrated to Prince Ed- 
ward Island when young, was later engaged 
in the shoe business and farming. By her 
first husband, Charles F. Webster, of Law- 
rence, Mrs. Kenrick has one daughter — Helen 
Miriam, born January 16, 1885. Mr. Ken- 
rick's happy faculty for adapting himself to 
circumstances is probably the secret of his suc- 
cess in life. His farm occupies a desirable 
location, within easy reach of the Boston 
market. In politics he is a Rejiublican. 



SNOCH WAITE, a prosperous manufact- 
urer of Franklin, Mass., one of the sons 
■ of the late Joseph and Anna Waite, 
was born in England in 1835. His father was 
a manufacturer of felt for King George in 
England, but came to this country when quite 
a young man and established himself in the 
same business. He was the first felt manu- 
facturer in America; and when he had estab- 
lished himself he sent for his wife and chil- 
dren, and made his home in Massachusetts. 



He died in 1888, at the age of seventy-seven; 
and his wife, Anna, died in 1892, at the age of 
ninety-one. They had ten children. 

After a brief term of schooling in New- 
market, England, Enoch Waite at eight years 
of age began to work at the felting trade. He 
came to America when he was fifteen years 
old, and first found employment in the old Bay 
State Mills, Lawrence, Mass. In 1856 he 
went to Johnson, R.I., and, starting a mill for 
Judge Pitman's son for the manufacture of felt 
carpet, remained there two years. Then he 
removed to Lowell and worked in the Middle- 
sex Mills until 1861, when he went to Win- 
chester and started a mill for S. M. Allen, 
where they manufactured fibrilla, an article 
made from tow and used during the war in the 
place of cotton. When peace was declared, 
there was no more use for their product, and 
the mill was closed. Mr. Waite ne.xt had 
charge of a mill in Charlestown for the manu- 
facture of felt carpets. He stayed there but 
two years, however, and then went to Law- 
rence again and engaged in the manufacture of 
glove linings. After a short time he pro- 
ceeded to Wrentham, where he managed a mill 
run by the Elliot Felting Company for the 
manufacture of felt table and piano covers as 
well as all other kinds of felt goods. 

In 1874 Mr. Waite came to P'ranklin and 
started in business for himself again, manu- 
facturing felt cloth, and in two years took a 
partner by the name of A. H. Morse. They 
worked together until 18S1, when the partner- 
ship was dissolved, and Mr. Waite started 
what is now known as the City Mills, which 
he managed for three years. He next started 
a felt-mill for F. B. Ray, called the Union 
Mill, and also went into business with Mr. 
Bannigon, known as the "rubber king," in 
Lawrence, Mass. They ran the Lawrence 
Felting Mills together until 1888, when Mr. 
Waite sold out his interest to his partner, and 
then conducted his own mill exclusively. He 
also bought a privilege in the Rockville Mill 
from Mr. Richardson, of Medway. He 
turned this into a felt-n)ill, and placed his 
son in charge. The mill is running at pres- 
ent to its full capacity. Mr. Waite is him- 
self president, treasurer, and manager of the 
Waite Felting Company, of Franklin, a posi- 



326 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



tion he has held for a number of years. He 
has been a very successful man in his busi- 
ness, and is counted one of the representative 
citizens of Franklin. 




'REDERICK P. DRAKE, an engineer 
and prominent citizen of Canton, was 
born here, March 16, 185 1, son of An- 
drew and Lucy (Gray) Drake. His grand- 
father, Ziba Drake, was the first one of the 
family to reside in the town. Andrew Drake, 
a native of Sharon, was in the coal business 
for many years in Boston, and was also en- 
gaged in the carpenter's trade. In politics he 
was a Republican. He married Lucy T. 
Gray, of Sandwich, and they had five children, 
as follows: Laura J., Sarah E., Harriett A., 
Mary E., and Frederick P. Mary, who is 
now deceased, was the wife of Fred Belcher; 
Laura J. is the widow of James L. Shepard ; 
Sarah E. is the widow of N. H. Lord; and 
Harriett A. is the wife of Isaac Capen. The 
father died in Canton at the age of seventy 
years. 

Frederick P. Drake received his education 
in the common schools of his native town and 
at the private school of Sanford \V. Billings in 
Sharon. When he was nineteen years of age 
he learned the carpenter's trade, and has fol- 
lowed it since. He has been in the employ- 
ment of the Revere Copper Company as car- 
penter for tvventy-si.x years. In politics he is 
a Republican. He was Constable for some 
years. In 1886 he formed the fire company, 
and has been chief of the board of fire en- 
gineers. He has been Selectman since 1892, 
when he was first elected to that ofifice. On 
November 2, 1897, on the Republican ticket, 
he was elected a member of the General Court 
from the Fourth Norfolk District. Mr. Drake 
is a member of the Blue Hill Lodge of Odd 
Fellows, of which he is Past Noble Grand. 
He is also Past Chief Patriarch of Mount He- 
bron Encampment, of Stoughton ; and he is 
also connected with the Knights of Honor, 
Richard Gridley Lodge, having passed all the 
chairs. He married Ellen Jones, a daughter 
of David Jones, of Stoughton. They have no 
family. Mr. Drake is a member of the Bap- 
tist church. 



JSAAC HILLS HAZELTON, M.D., a 
highly respected physician of Wellesley, 
was born in Boston, May 17, 1838. A 
son of Isaac and Susan (Pickard) Hazel- 
ton, he is a direct descendant of the Robert 
Hazelton who, with his brother John, was 
one of the first settlers of Rowley in about 
1639. His grandfather, Thomas Hazelton, 
was born in Chester, N.H., in 1776, and, 
having spent his life there engaged in farm- 
ing, died in 1847. Thomas married Lucretia 
Hills in June, 1800. Their son, Isaac Hills 
Hazelton, Sr., who was born in Chester, 
N.H., June 8, 1805, and followed the occupa- 
tion of builder, married Susan, a daughter of 
Jere Pickard, of Dresden, Me., and died in 
September, 1863. The Pickard family came 
to this country from England in 1630, and 
settled in Massachusetts. 

Isaac Hills Hazelton, the subject of this 
biography, received his elementary education 
in the public schools of Boston. He was sub- 
sequently a member of the class of i860 at 
Harvard College. He left college, however, 
to join the undergraduate department of the 
Medical School, and afterward, in i86i, grad- 
uated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
In April of the same year he was appointed 
assistant physician at the Concord Asylum. 
He passed the examinations for admission to 
the navy in the following September, and 
on the 17th received his appointment as 
assistant surgeon from Gideon Wells, then 
the Secretary of the Navy. This position 
he held until September 11, 1865, when 
he resigned. In December, 1861, he was 
sent on the United States recruiting -ship 
"Ohio," and in January of 1S62 on the "Ver- 
mont." He sailed for Port Royal, S.C., Feb- 
ruary 24, 1862, and arrived April 16, after a 
perilous voyage. He was ordered to the 
"Paul Jones" on December 31, and afterward 
took part in several expeditions through 
South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. From 
July 10 to July 18, 1863, he was engaged in 
the attack on Charleston. He was with the 
army temporarily during the bombardment of 
Fort Wagner and at Beaufort, S.C., where he 
was in charge of three hospitals from July 19 
to August 19, 1863. After leaving Beaufort, 
he came to Boston, but was ordered to the 




ISAAC H. HAZELTON. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



329 



Boston yard in September, and to the Pacific 
Squadron on the 14th of December, 1864, serv- 
ing on the United States flag-ship "Lancas- 
ter." He returned East, July 10, 1865. On 
September 12, 1865, after resigning from the 
naval service, he was appointed associate phy- 
sician at the McLean Asylum, where he prac- 
tised for two years. He is now a member of 
the Wellesley Board of Health, and is the 
local medical examiner for a number of insur- 
ance companies. For many years he has been 
the State Medical Examiner of Lunacy. He 
is a member of the Massachusetts Medical So- 
ciety, Norfolii County Medical Society, of the 
Loyal Legion, of the Charles Ward Grand 
Army Post of Newton, and of the Kearsarge 
Association of Naval Veterans, and of ' the 
Regular Army and Navy Union, of which he 
was surgeon -general on the staff of the Com- 
mander-in-Chief. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican; and he served on the Republican Town 
Committee, of which he was chairman for sev- 
eral years. He attends the Congregational 
church. 

Dr. Hazelton was married in Newburyport, 
Mass., on November 23, 1867, to Mary Allen 
Brewster, a daughter of William H. Brewster, 
who was a lineal descendant of Elder Brews- 
ter. Dr. and Mrs. Hazelton have had four 
children: Mary Brewster, born in November, 
1868; Isaac Brewster, born in December, 
1870, now studying at the Institute of Tech- 
nology; Olivia B., born in January, 1873, 
now at home; and Margaret P., born in Marcli, 
1876, also living at home. The eldest daugh- 
ter studied at the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts, where she has been a teacher for the 
last four years. She took the Halgarten prize 
in 1896, the first time it was ever awarded to 
a woman. 



YpT^AYMOND S. BYAM, an enterprising 
I ^-^ and prosperous business man of Can- 
|b\ ton, was born November 15, 1839, 

^"^ in Chelmsford, Mass., son of Otis 
Byam. The family was first represented in 
America by the traditional three brothers from 
England, one of whom settled in Chelmsford, 
near Robbins Hill, where some of his descend- 
ants have since lived. Otis Byam was born 



and reared on the old home farm in Chelms- 
ford. When a young man he went to Boston, 
where he was for some years a merchant, and 
also kept the old hotel called the Hanover 
House. He subsequently returned to the 
scenes of his childhood, and, purchasing the 
Byam homestead, carried on general farming 
until his death in 1858, at the age of sixty- 
four years. He was a man of unblemished 
character, honest and uprigiit, and a strcjng 
Democrat in politics, although he never cared 
to hold office. He married Miss Lavina 
Boomer, of Keene, N. H. Of their four chil- 
dren, George O. , of Chelmsford, and Ray- 
mond S. are living. 

Raymond S. Byam was an attentlant of the 
Chelmsford common schools until seventeen 
years old. Then he went into the milk busi- 
ness in Lowell, Mass., and was engaged in it 
for two years. During the following twelve 
months he conducted a livery stable on tiie 
corner of Middlesex and Howard Streets in 
that city. In July, i86i, he enlisted in Com- 
pany G of the Sixteenth Massachusetts Volun- 
teer Infantry, known as the Butler Rifles, and 
afterward served for three years in the Civil 
War, being promoted to the rank of Corporal 
of the color guards, and assigned to the pio- 
neer corps. He saw much of the roughest 
part of army life, and was an active partici- 
pant in many of the hardest fought battles of 
the war. He was in the engagement at F'or- 
tress Monroe, under General Wolf; saw the 
"Monitor" sink the "Merrimac, " March 9, 
1862; was at Gosport Navy Yard. Having 
joined General Hooker at Fair Oaks, he took 
part in the Seven Days' Plight ; was ne.xt at 
Harrison's Landing; stood beside the gallant 
Genera] Sickles when he lost his leg at the 
battle of Gettysburg; was later at Hanover 
Court-house, the second Bull Run, Peters- 
burg, and Chancellorsville. In the last- 
named battle he received a slight wound. He 
completed his term of service at Petersburg in 
July, 1864. After his return to Chelmsford, 
Mr. Byam remained at home for a short time. 
In the fall of 1864, he went to Roxbury, 
Mass., where he was for two years engaged 
in driving an express wagon to Boston. In 
1866 he came to Canton as messenger for 
Crummett's Express Company, a position 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



which he held for two years. In 1868 he es- 
tablished his present express business between 
here and Boston, forming a partnership with 
his brother, S. L. Byam, who is now deceased. 
The express is conducted under the name of 
Byam & Co. He also deals in coal, ice, lime, 
cejiient, drain pipe, hay, and other merchan- 
dise; and he does a large business in moving 
furniture, employing several men and keeping 
twenty-seven horses. 

Mr. Byam takes a genuine interest in all 
matters pertaining to the town's welfare and 
prosperity, and for five years did efficient ser- 
vice as Selectman and Overseer of the Poor. 
In politics he is identified with the Republi- 
can party. He is a member of the New Eng- 
land Railroad Agency and of the Boston E.\- 
press League, and is the National Color Bearer 
in the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Com- 
pany of Boston. He was made a Mason in the 
Blue Hill Lodge; and he belongs to Mount 
Zion Chapter, R. A. M., and to the Joseph 
Warren Commandery, K. T. , of Ro.xbury. 
He is also a member of Revere Post, No. 94, 
G. A. R., of which he has been chaplain for 
some time. 

On November 6, 1S67, he married Miss 
Helen S. Bailey, who, born and reared in 
Philadelphia, died May 8, 1S97. Their three 
children are: Ella S., Harry S., and Alice 
M. Mr. Byam and his family attend the 
Universalist church. 



rmo 



EORGE V. RICHARDSON, a re- 
\ 3 I tired business man of Needham, was 
born in 1825 in Canton, Mass., son 
of John and Sally (Tufts) Richardson. The 
father, who was born in Quincy, Mass., in 
1799, and was a hatter by trade, died in 1859. 
The mother, a daughter of Joseph Tufts, was 
born in 1796, and died in 1884. 

George Richardson was eight years of age 
when he was withdrawn from the common 
schools and sent to work for Joseph Fisher, a 
machinist. He lived with Mr. Fisher for two 
years, doing chores and working around the 
house, and attending school in winter for a few 
weeks. Subsequently he was employed in 
several different families in the same way 
until 1S35, when he went to Dedham to live 



with Eben Wight and his sister. After stay- 
ing in Dedham two years, he went to live with 
Joseph Briggs on Federal Hill, where he re- 
mained one year. In 1842 he began to learn 
the carpenter's trade with William Eaton. 
With Mr. Eaton he stayed four years, and then 
worked at the trade for about twenty-five years. 
He had worked in his brother's sash and blind 
factory in Boston for three years when his 
brother sold out. Then Mr. Richardson en- 
gaged in the business of making oil tanks, 
forming a partnership with Edwin Irvine, 
under the firm name of Richardson & Irvine. 
After four years he bought out his partner's 
interest, and continued in the business with 
his son as partner, under the name of Richard- 
son & Son, until 1891, when he sold out and 
retired. He is now living in Needham. In 
the Baptist Church of Needham he is a 
Deacon, a member of the Standing Committee 
and of most of the other committees. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican. 

Mr. Richardson was married in 1850 to Ann 
Jane, daughter of John Davis, of Needham, 
now Wellesley. She died in 1866. They 
had seven children, namely: Ann Elizabeth, 
who married Zadock Bradford, and lives in 
Somerville; Emma Louisa, who married 
Charles Thorpe, and lives at Highlandville; 
George Davis, who died aged nine years; 
Frank Bowman, who married Margaret Mor- 
gan, of Salem, was his father's partner, and is 
now doing business in Boston; Eben Henry, 
who married Carrie L. Tuttle, of Hyde Park ; 
Clara Veazie, who died when four years old ; 
and Mary F'rances, who married Augustus 
Zirngiebel, and lives in Needham. Mr. Rich- 
ardson was married a second time in 1878 to 
Sarah, daughter of Moses Alden, of Newton 
Upper Falls. Her father belongs to the third 
generation of the Aldens who have lived on 
the old estate in Needham, and is a direct de- 
scendant of John Alden, of the Plymouth 
Colony. 



^-IT^ROF. WILLIAM RUSSELL SMITH 
lk»/ was for many years prominent as a 
ll g) musician in Medfield and the adjoin- 
ing towns. Born here September 1 1, 

1S38, he was a son of Jeremiah Russell and 




WILLIAM R. SMITH. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIFAV 



333 



Eliza (Mason) Smith, both natives of Med- 
field. The paternal grandfather, also named 
Jeremiah, settled in the southern part of the 
town on what is now known as Nelson farm, 
and was there engaged in farming for many 
years. The father, who also followed agricult- 
ure here for a time, is now living in Provi- 
dence, R.I., with his daughter. His first 
wife, Eliza, died at the age of thirty. After 
her death he married Christiana Bigelow, of 
Charlton, Mass., who is now also deceased. 
By the first marriage there were two children 
— William R. and Eliza M. Mary A., a 
child of the second wife, is now the wife of 
Melvin Willard, of Providence, a salesman of 
carriages. 

William Russell Smith attended the com- 
mon schools for the usual period. Afterward 
he was sent to Reading Academy and then to 
Boston, where he made a special study of 
music. He began as a teacher of music by 
instructing pupils in Medfield, Norwood, 
Millis, Mansfield, and other towns, while he 
resided in Medfield. Subsequently, in addi- 
tion to his many private pupils, he had charge 
of the music training in Dean Academy. In 
1872 he came to the farm where his family 
now reside. Here he made many improve- 
ments, and added to the original twenty-seven 
acres by the purchase of woodlands. His time 
being entirely occupied by his professional 
duties, he was obliged to hire a foreman to 
manage the farm work; but all work done upon 
the place has been carried on under his instruc- 
tions. His evenings were occupied in direct- 
ing classes, bands, or orchestras, or in conduct- 
ing sundry choirs, of which he was the leader. 
For fourteen years he was the organist and 
choir leader at the Unitarian church; and for 
the eight years preceding his death, which oc- 
curred on April 25, 1896, he held a like posi- 
tion in the Second Congregational Church. 
His interest in this department of his work 
was strong, and the fine discrimination with 
which the anthems or hymns were selected and 
rendered clearly betokened his musical ability, 
knowledge, and taste. His patience in con- 
ducting rehearsals was remarkable. Pie was 
ever ready to give extra time when needed, and 
he had the happy faculty of keeping the mem- 
bers of his choir in harmonious comradeship. 



He was an expert performer on the piano, 
organ, cornet, and various stringed instru- 
ments. While possessed in so full a degree 
with the artistic temperament, he was in every 
respect a manly man. In politics he voted the 
Republican ticket. He was a member of the 
Royal Arcanum and of the A. O. of U. W. 
of Medfield. None knew him who did not 
grieve for his loss when he died. 

On September 5, 1865, Professor Smith 
married Julia A. Hamant, of Medfield, who 
died August 9, 1869. On June 30, 1872, he 
married Mary Jane Hamant, a sister of the 
first Mrs. Smith. By the second marriage 
there were thiee children : I^llis Russell, born 
May 2, 1873, who died April 5, 1874; Will- 
iam Bernard, born December 28, 1874, who 
died July 15, 1892; and Bertram Hamant, 
born I-'ebruary 10, 1879, now attending school. 
William B. Smith was a most promising young 
man and a talented musician. With his nat- 
ural ability and the early instruction given 
him by his father, a brilliant career seemed 
before him. He was a member of the Med- 
field Utopian Club and a great favorite 
throughout the town. His early death was 
greatly lamented, and his parents had the sym- 
pathy of a wide circle of friends. 



RANCIS H. COWING, formerly for 
many years railroad station agent in 
Weymouth and a member of the present 
Board of Assessors, was born in this town De- 
cember 17, 1834, son of Joshua B. and Deb- 
orah (Cushing) Cowing. He is a descendant 
on both sides of well-known W'eymouth fami- 
lies. His great-uncle, Joshua Bates, a native 
of Boston, but long a resident of London and a 
member of the firm of the Messrs. Baring of 
that city, in 1852 founded the Boston Public 
Library by donating fifty thonsand dollars for 
the erection of a suitable building, subse- 
quently increasing his benefactions by a like 
sum for the purchase of books. This was the 
building on Boylston Street, near Tremont 
Street, which continued in use for library pur- 
poses until 1895. Donations of money and 
books for the purpose had previouslv been 
made, beginning in 1843, when M. Vattemare 
secured a gift of books from the city of Paris; 



534 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



but Mr. Bates was the one who made the 
library an accomplished fact. His name was 
given to the main hall in commemoration of 
his munificence, and has been i)erpetuated in 
the main hall of the present magnificent 
structure in Copley Square. Joshua B. Cow- 
ing, father of the subject of this sketch, was 
a lifelong resident of Weymouth and for many 
years a custom boot and shoe maker by trade. 
He died in 1S85. Seven of his children now 
survive, and of these Francis H. is the eldest. 
Francis II. Cowing acquired a common- 
school education. At the age of eighteen he 
obtained employment as clerk in a general 
store, in which capacity he served some five 
years, on June i, 1857, being appointed sta- 
tion agent of the old South Shore Railway. 
He also ably and faithfully discharged the 
duties of telegraph operator for thirty-three 
■years, or until i8go, when he resigned. Hav- 
ing invested his savings to good advantage, he 
is at the present time in easy circumstances. 
For a number of years he has been a trustee 
of the Weymouth Savings Bank. In politics 
he is a Republican, and he has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Assessors since 1895. 
His long service as station agent gained for 
him a wide circle of friends and acquaint- 
ances, and he is respected and esteemed by all 
who know him. 



Ji 



ANIKL WARREN, a prosperous 
merchant of Wellesley, born in. 
1826, is a native of Cork County, 
Ireland, which has been the birth- 
place of nine generations of his family; for the 
Warrens are an old and prominent family in 
Ireland. Daniel Warren was educated in the 
public schools in Cork County. At the age of 
fifteen he went to learn the carpenter's trade. 
He worked at his trade for three years, after 
which he spent one year at home. Another 
year was passed in working at his trade, and 
then, having made up his mind to come to 
America, he set to work to earn the money 
for his passage. He came to this country in 
the year 1852, landing in New York with one 
dollar and twelve cents in his pocket. By the 
time he reached Hartford, Conn., he had but 
twelve cents left. However, he soon found 



employment with a contractor, building 
bridges. After working for him one year, he 
spent another in the employment of C(jllins & 
Cushing at the same business, and then came 
to that part of Needham which is now Welles- 
ley, and worked in a machine shop for thir- 
teen years. In 1S69 he went into the coal 
business, and has been engaged in it ever 
since, He has increased his business each 
year; and he now has an extensive trade in 
coal, hay, grain, etc. Mr. Warren is a public- 
spirited citizen, and has been in many public 
positions. He was a member of the board of 
Town Assessors, and he was serving on the 
Town Committee when Wellesley was set off 
from Needham. He was for many years a 
member of the Improvement Society, and was 
the first Irishman from Needham to sit upon a 
jury. That was over thirty years ago, and 
since then he has served many times, and also 
on the grand jury. Mr. Warren is a member 
of the Newton branch of the Irish Land 
League. In religious belief he is a Roman 
Catholic and an earnest supporter of his 
church. He bought the land where the church 
now stands, and had charge of the construction 
of the building. He has always done a great 
deal toward building up church property and 
making improvements generally. 

Mr. Warren was married in W'atertown in 
1S56 to Ann Reynolds, who was born in 
Lei trim County, Ireland, and came to this 
country in 184S. Mr. and Mrs. Warren have 
had six children, namely: Margaret, born in 
1857, who married James Caley, and is now 
living in Canada; Fannie, born in 1859, who 
was educated at Notre Dame Academy, Rox- 
bury, and at Boston University, and is now the 
principal of the Wellesley North School ; 
Jeremiah, born in 1861, who died in 1862; 
Mary, living at home; Daniel, born in 1867, 
now in the e.xpress business at Wellesley 
Lower Falls; and John, born in 1873, with 
his father in the coal business. 



BEN HIGGINS, the proprietor of Elm- 
wood Farm, Dover, was born in 
Gloucester, Mass., March 31, 1845, 
son of Eben and Lydia (Tucker) Higgins. 
His grandparents, Eben and Susan (Sears) 




FREDERICK H. KIXGSBUKV. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



337 



Higgins, both natives of Brewster, Mass., 
spent their last years in Newtonville. 

Eben Higgins (second), the father of the 
subject of this sketch, was a native of ]?rews- 
ter. At an early age he went to sea, and 
eventually became master of a vessel. After 
acquiring considerable wealth he retired from 
active occupation. For several years he re- 
sided in Gloucester. In 1866 he settled upon 
a farm in Dover, where he resided for seven 
years. Then he moved to Newtonville, where 
be passed the rest of his life. He died in 
18S0. His wife, Lydia, whose father was a 
native of Gloucester, became the mother of 
five children — Lydia Ann, Eben, Willard 
Sears, Susan Abbey, and Howard Holbrook. 
Lydia, now deceased, was the wife of Abram 
Bigelow, of Dover, who is now residing in 
Wellesley, Mass. Willard Sears is now a 
member of the firm of Higgins & Nickerson, 
carpenters and builders of Newtonville. He 
wedded Maria James, of Gloucester, who died 
some time ago. Susan Abbey married Roger 
Bartelle, a native of Dover. .She is dead, and 
her husband is now in California. Howard 
Holbrook died at the age of three months. 
The mother resides in Newtonville. 

Eben Higgins, the subject of this sketch, 
was educated in the common and high schools 
of Gloucester. Subsequently he went to sea 
a year with his father, and then learned the 
carpenter's trade in Watertown, Mass. Hav- 
ing spent two years in Watertown, he worked 
in Dover for a time. After his marriage he 
went to Newtonville, where he was engaged in 
the building business until 1877, when failing 
health compelled him to relinquish laborious 
employment. The Elmwood Farm was pur- 
chased by him later. This property, which 
consists of twenty-seven acres, he has greatly 
improved by the erection of new buildings; 
and he continues to cultivate it. At the pres- 
ent time he is engaged at his trade of car- 
penter. Politically, he is an active supporter 
of the Republican party. He has served as 
Town Treasurer since 1889, has been Town 
Clerk since 1890, was an Assessor for four 
years, is a Justice of the Peace, and he is 
secretary of the Republican Town Committee. 

On September 15, 1868, Mr. Higgins was 
joined in marriage with Sarah A. Goulding. 



She was born in Garland, Me., daughter of 
Lewis and Maria (Holbrook) Goulding. Her 
father, who was a native of Worcester, Mass., 
settled upon a farm in Garland, and resided 
there until his death. His widow, now also 
deceased, came to Dover and married Josiah 
Battelle. After Mr. Battellc's death she 
wedded Caleb Haskell, who has since died. 
Mr. and Mrs. Higgins have three children, 
namely : Eben Edward, born November 2, 
1871; Charles Herbert, born February 23, 
1875; ''i"f' Lydia A., born January 27, 1884. 
Eben E. is now a machinist in Boston, Mass. 
Charles Herbert, D. V. S. , is a graduate of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College and 
of the Magill University, Montreal. He has 
already acquired a high reputation as a veteri- 
nary surgeon, and is now practising in Dover, 
with headquarters at Elmwood Farm. J^ydia 
A. is residing at home. Mr. Higgins is con- 
nected with Medfield Lodge, No. 1 16, 
I. O. O. F. ; Natick Council, No. 126, Royal 
Arcanum; John Elliott Lodge, No. 149, An- 
cient Order of United Workmen, of West 
Newton; the Dover Grange, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry; and with the Wildey Casualty Com- 
pany. Both he and Mrs. Higgins are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, and take 
an active interest in religious work. 




REDERICK H. KINGSBURY, the 
popular Town Clerk and Collector of 
Ta.xes of Wellesley, was born in Need- 
ham, now Wellesley, in 1854. A son of De.x- 
ter and Mary Ann (Dewing) Kingsbury, he 
belongs to an old and highly respected family 
of the county. His grandfather, Luther Kings- 
bury, a native of Needham, and a farmer and 
large land-owner, married Elmira Morse, of 
Natick. Their son, Dexter, who was born 
May II, 1 814, became a farmer. De.xter was 
the foreman of the Bussey farm, Jamaica 
Plain, for eight years; the warden of the 
Wellesley town farm for the same length of 
time, and at a later date the foreman of the 
Dr. Morton farm in this town. Pie died in 
1892. His wife, Mary, a daughter of Seth 
and Olive (Haven) Dewing, late of Needham, 
is still living at the age of sevent\'-eight years. 
The early life of Frederick H. Kingsbury 



338 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



was spent at home, and he attended the com- 
mon schools and later the high school. At 
the age of eighteen he became a clerk in the 
grocery store of Mansfield & Bigelow, where 
he remained for four years. During this time 
also he was Deputy Postmaster. Subse- 
quently, until 1882, he was associated with his 
father in farming. Then he was elected Col- 
lector of Ta.xes for the town of Wellesley, 
which office he has held for every term since 
except one. He has been Town Clerk since 
1888, discharging the duties of that office also 
in a manner satisfactory to all concerned. He 
is the administrator of his father's estate, is 
the secretary of the Wellesley Land Improve- 
ment Association, and is still engaged in 
farming. 

In 1885 Mr, Kingsbury married Edith A., 
daughter of George and Catherine Nelson, of 
Milford, N.H. He has two children: Dexter 
Nelson, born in March, 1887; and Elizabeth 
Louise, born September 15, i8go. Both chil- 
dren are attending school. In politics Mr. 
Kingsbury is a zealous Republican. He is a 
Past Grand of Sincerity Lodge, No. 173, 
I. O. O. F. ; a member of Welcome Lodge, 
Daughters of Rebecca, at Natick; and the sec- 
retary and treasurer of Wellesley Grange, Pa- 
trons of Husbandry. 




(ALVIN FAIRBANKS, one of the 
, leading farmers and mill-owners of 

\ ^ Caryville, Bellingham, Mass., the 
son of Elijah and Nancy (Adams) 
Fairbanks, was born in the house where he 
now lives, October 25, 1825. His paternal 
grandfather, Joseph Fairbanks, who was the 
first of the family to own and occupy the home- 
stead, was an e.\tensive farmer and the owner 
of a great deal of mill property. He married 
Mary Metcalf, by whom he had four children 
— Elijah, Jonas M., Emery, and Lucy. 

Their son Elijah followed his father's busi- 
ness. He was a prominent and public- 
spirited citizen, and filled most of the town 
offices at different times. He died in 1871, 
aged eighty-three. His wife was Nancy 
Adams, of Medway. They had eight children, 
as follows: Rufus, who died in March, 1838, 
at the age of twenty-four; Edwin, deceased; 



William; George, born December 29, 1819, 1 
who died February i, i860; Joseph, born No- 
vember 25, 1823, now dead; Calvin, the sub- 
ject of our sketch; Jemima, born April 9, 
1829, now the widow of Asa Patridge, living 
in Jamaica Plain, Mass. ; and Nancy, born 
January 8, 1835, who died when a young girl. 

Calvin l'"airbanks obtained his elementary 
education in the jjublic schools of Bellingijiam, 
pursued more advanced studies at the high 
school in Medway, where he was graduated, 
and afterward attended the academy at Warren, 
Mass., while teaching school evenings. With 
the exception of three years that were passed 
in Kennebunk, Me., where he and his brother 
owned a saw-mill, his active life has been 
spent in his native town. After returning 
from Maine, he and his brother went into the 
shoe business together, and were very success- 
ful in the undertaking. In 1879 Mr. Fair- 
banks came to the farm where he now lives 
engaged in general farming and dairying. 
The estate contains about one hundred and 
seventy-five acres, and is well managed. 

A man of good judgment and practical abil- 
ity, fair-minded and honorable, Mr. Fairbanks 
enjoys the respect and confidence of the towns- 
people. He has held the office of Tax Collec- 
tor for twelve years, and has also served as 
Assessor, besides filling other minor offices. 
In politics he is a Republican. He has been 
a member of the Congregational church in 
West Medway for a number of years. 

He was first married in i860 to Almira 
Storer, of Kennebunk, Me., who died leaving 
no children. He was again married in 1861 
to Jane E. , a daughter of Samuel and Eudotia 
(Hall) Young, of Orwell, Vt. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fairbanks have one son — Highland C, born 
January 5, 1867, now living at home with his 
parents. 



OSEPH TAILBY, the well-known florist 
and horticulturist of Wellesley, was 
born in Leicestershire, England, and 
received his early education from the 
free schools of that county. When only thir- 
teen years of age he began to work in a nursery 
and greenhouse; and five years later he became 
foreman in a private greenhouse in Knowle, 




JOHN F. WALL. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



341 



near liirminyham, Enf^land. J-'or two and one- 
half years he remained in this position, anil 
then became special <;ar(lener and steward for 
William I). Dewier, a prominent manufact- 
urer of the same town. At the end of another 
two and one-half years he went to work in a 
similar position for Carter & Co., of London; 
and in 1865 he crossed the Atlantic and landed 
at New York City. He came to South Fram- 
ingham to take charge of the nursery and 
greenhouses of E. J. Powers, and had re- 
mained with him some two years and a half 
when he settled in VVellesleyand established a 
business for himself in a small way near where 
he is at present located. His buildings now 
cover si.xteen thousand, five hundred square 
feet of land. 

Mr. Tailby and his son, who is in partner- 
ship with him, make a specialty of hybridizing 
and producing new varieties of plants and 
yowers, and also do a large retail business in 
cut flowers and plants. Mr. Tailby is the 
originator of the American types of carnations. 
In 1880 the Massachusetts Horticultural So- 
ciety gave him the prospective prize of forty 
dollars for the best seedling carnation. He 
was obliged to compete for three years against 
all comers, but finally carried off the prize, and 
is the only person to whom it has ever been 
awarded. The variety of carnation that won 
this proud honor was known as the "Grace 
Wilder." In 1S95 Mr. Tailby received the 
silver medal from the Massachusetts Horticult- 
ural Society for a yellow calla lily, the 
"Elliotana. " He is now producing hybrids 
between the Elliotana and the common Arum, 
or Jack-in-the-pulpit, that quaintest of flowers, 
which grows wild in New England and is 
known to every school boy and school girl. 
Mr. Tailby has taken many medals and certifi- 
cates of merit from the Massachusetts and 
New York Horticultural Societies, and is the 
originator of the Tailby hybrid cucumber, of 
which the seed sold the first year for eighty 
dollars per pound. This was also awarded a 
silver medal. When the Bruse seedling pota- 
toes were first introduced, Mr. Tailby propa- 
gated them in the hot-house from clippings, 
and sold the plants at eighteen dollars per 
dozen, realizing over five hundred dollars. 

He married, in 1865, Eliza, daughter of 



James Allen, of 15irmingham, ICngland, and 
has two sons — Joseph A. and William W. 
Josejih A. Tailby was born in 1866. He was 
educated in the grammar school of WelJesley, 
in Chauncy Hall .School, Boston, and at the 
College of I'harmacy in that city. He worked 
as an assistant at Clark University in Worces- 
ter for two years, and then became teacher fif 
chemistry in the College of Pharmacy from 
which he had been graduated. He now has 
charge for Conner & Co., manufacturing chem- 
ists, Boston. The younger son, William W., 
was instrumental in organizing the New P2ng- 
land Flower Growers' Association, of which he 
has been from the beginning secretary and 
treasurer. He is a prominent Mason, having 
taken the Knight Templar degree. 

Mr. Tailby is a communicant of the ]{pis- 
copal church, and belongs to the parish here in 
Wellesley, at the organization of which he was 
one of the original signers. Fraternally, he 
is a member of Sincerity Lodge, No. 173, 
I. O. O. F., is now Its treasurer, as he has 
been for twelve years, and has passed all the 
chairs in both the subordinate lodge and en- 
campment. He is also a member of the 
R. A., of Natick ; member and secretary of the 
Massachusetts Horticultural Society; member 
of the Florists' Club of Boston and of the 
American Florists' Society. At the time of 
the great Peace Jubilee in Boston in 1872, Mr. 
Tailby was delegated as a conimittee of one 
from British subjects in Boston, to wait on 
Colonel F'lugier, of the British Grenadiers, to 
solicit his permission for the famous Grenadier 
Guards Band to play outside the building, it 
having been announced, authoritatively or not, 
that they would play only in the Coliseum. 
Mr. Tailby, assisted by the Hfirticultural F"ra- 
ternity, presented each member of the band, 
also each member of Gilmore's Band, with a 
hand bouquet, a button- hole bouquet of moss 
roses, and a rosette of red, white, and blue 
ribbons. 



OHN F. WALL, the chairman of Nor- 
folk's Board of Selectmen, and an en- 
terprising paper manufacturer, was born 
in Dover, Mass., September 11, 1854. 
His parents, Patrick and Eliza (Nash) Wall, 



342 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



were natives of Killarney, Ireland. The 
father, who emigrated to the United States at 
the age of twenty years, settled upon a farm 
in Dover, and there followed agriculture with 
prosperity for many years. His last days were 
spent in Boston, where he died in February, 



189- 



He served in the Civil War with the 



Twenty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteer In- 
fantry, sustaining the loss of a limb. His 
widow, who is now residing in Boston, has 
been the mother of thirteen children, of whom 
William H., John F., Joseph J., James E., 
Lizzie E., Francis, and Philip are living. 
James E. is a stock-broker in Boston; Joseph 
J. is in the provision business in South Bos- 
ton; William H., Francis, and Philip follow 
the same business in other parts of that city ; 
and Lizzie E. is a book-keeper. The others 
were: Martin, Edward, and Mary, who reached 
maturity; and three who died in infancy. 

John F. Wall was educated in the common 
schools of Dover. At the age of thirteen he 
went to work as a farm assistant for a Mr. 
Otis, and was later advanced to the position 
of foreman. After his marriage he engaged 
in the manufacture of paper with his father-in- 
law, the late William Hill, of Dover; and 
some five or six years later he established 
himself in the same business in Norfolk. He 
manufactures several kinds of paper, which 
find a ready market in Boston and other 
places, and has a thriving business. His 
factory, the Campbell Mill, located in the 
eastern part of the town, was destroyed by 
fire, December 28, 1896, causing him con- 
siderable loss. He resides upon a good farm 
of sixty acres, which he has greatly improved, 
and is now devoting his spare time to its 
cultivation. 

Mr. Wall was elected as a Democrat to the 
Board of Selectmen three years ago, and he 
has been its chairman for the past two years. 
At one time he served as Constable. As an 
able and industrious business man he has 
gained the confidence of his fellow-townsmen, 
and the efficiency he displays in public office 
is heartily appreciated. He is a member of 
King David Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; of Wonewok 
Tribe, No. 83, Improved Order of Red Men, 
of Franklin; and of the Sons of Veterans of 
Franklin, Mass. On January 28, 1872, he 



was united in marriage with Jennie C. Hill, 
daughter of William and Kittie (Chamless) 
Hill, late of Dover. Mrs. Wall is the mother 
of two children — Kittie C. and Ayana L. — 
both of whom are residing at home. 




^^^/^'MLLARD W. turner, an es- 
teemed and highly respected citizen 
of Foxboro, was born in this town, 
January 30, 1839, son of the late Willard P. 
Turner. His father, who was born in Stough- 
ton, this county, was educated in Foxboro, 
having come here when a little lad to make 
his home with his uncle, the Rev. Willard 
Pierce. Willard P. Turner learned the tail- 
or's trade in Foxboro, afterward working here 
for some years. He was also for a time con- 
nected with the straw shops, and largely in- 
terested in their improvements. From the 
organization of the party, in 1856, he was a 
loyal Republican until his death, which oc- 
curred October 18, 1896, at the age of eighty- 
two years. For two years he was Selectman 
of the town, serving faithfully and ably. He 
married Miss Catherine Bird, a daughter of 
Warren and Esther (Belcher) Bird, and with 
her reared two children — Kate and Willard 
W. Kate is now the widow of the late Cal- 
vin French. She kept house for her father in 
his declining years. 

Willard W. Turner completed his education 
in the public schools of Foxboro. Subse- 
quently he worked in the shops of the Union 
Straw Company for some years. In April, 
1861, he enlisted with a company of three 
months' men in the Fourth Massachusetts 
Volunteer Infantry, and was afterward at the 
battle of Big Bethel. On returning to Fox- 
boro, Mr. Turner resumed work in the straw 
shops, where he was employed until he re- 
tired in 1885. He has since devoted a good 
deal of time and attention to the raising of 
cranberries for the market, having been asso- 
ciated with his father in this industry for 
many years, his average annual crop being 
from five hundred to eight hundred barrels. 
He is a stanch Republican in politics, and 
voted for Abraham Lincoln in i860, that being 
his first Presidential vote. He was a Tax 
Collector for a year. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



343 



Mr. Turner's first wife, whose maiden name 
was Annie Barker, was born in New Bedford. 
She died a few years after her marriage, leav- 
ing one child, Mabel F. , who resides with her 
aunt, Mrs. French. Mr. Turner subsequently 
married Miss Jane A. Locke, of Lexington, 
Mass. They have three children — Roy L. , 
Henry VV., and Anne W. Mr. Turner is 
much interested in Masonry, and is a member 
of St. Alban's Lodge, F. & A. M. ; and of 
Keystone Chapter, R. A. M. Both he and 
Mrs. Turner arc Universal ists. 




LLEN COLBURN, a well-to-do farmer 
and dairyman, who has contributed his 
full share toward advancing the 
agricultural interests of Norfolk 
County, was born October 38, 1832, in West 
Dedham, in the house in which he now re- 
sides. He is a son of the late Thatcher Col- 
burn, and is descended from a i)ioneer family 
of this part of Massachusetts. 

Nathaniel Colburn emigrated from England, 
August II, 1637, and received a grant of land 
in the town of Dedham. He married Pris- 
cilla Clark in 1639. The line of descent is 
as follows: Samuel, son of Nathaniel, born 
January 25, 1654-5; Plphraim, born Novem- 
ber 6, 1687; Ephraim, born December 31, 
1716; Ichabod, born February 26, 1754; and 
Thatcher, born February 20, 1787. 

Thatcher Colburn was brought up on the 
home farm that afterward came into his pos- 
session. He was an energetic, industrious 
man, and in the course of his seventy-eight 
years of life made excellent improvements on 
his place. He married Hitty Cleveland, who 
was born in Dover, this county, and died at 
the old homestead, at the venerable age of 
eighty-eight years. They reared a family of 
five children, of whom Allen, above named, 
and Howard, Deputy Sheriff of Norfolk 
County, are the only survivors. The eldest 
son, Waldo Colburn, who was graduated from 
Phillips Academy at Andover and from the 
Harvard Law School, and became one of the 
leading lawyers of the State, was for a time a 
Judge of the Superior Court and later of the 
Supreme Court. He was prominent in local 
affairs, serving as Selectman of the town for 



many years. He lived to the age of sixty 
years. 

Allen Colburn received a good common- 
school education, and under the tuition of his 
father became as familiar with the theory and 
practice of agriculture as with the contents of 
his text-books. Choosing the free and inde- 
pendent occupation to which he was trained as 
his life work, he remained with his parents, 
and succeeded to the ownership of the farm. 
He has fifty acres of arable land, on which he 
carries on general farming with success, and 
makes somewhat of a specialty of dairying, 
selling the milk from his twenty cows in the 
Dedham markets. 

Mr. Colburn was married December 18, 
1856, to Miss Nancy Colburn, daughter of 
Walter Colburn, of this town, a well-known 
farmer and butcher. Mrs. Colburn lived but 
a short time after their union, dying at the 
age of twenty-one years, and leaving one child, 
Nancy E. She was a woman of fine character, 
highly respected, and was a regular attendant 
of the Unitarian church. Mr. Colburn is a 
decided Republican, but takes no active part 
in political affairs. He well sustains the rep- 
utation of his ancestors for sterling traits of 
character and useful citizenship. He is an 
attendant of the Baptist church and a liberal 
contributor toward its sup]5ort. 



(5 I HOMAS A. GEORGE, a merchant of 

' I Wrentham, was born here, July 23, 
1815, son of Artemus and Annie 
(Grant) George. The great-grandfather, 
Richard George, who was one of the earl}' set- 
tlers of the town, married Jerusha Hancock on 
February 9, 173S. His children were: Han- 
nah, born November 30, 1738; Jerusha, born 
May 8, 1740; Thomas, born December 12, 
1742; John, born October 28, 1744; Sarah, 
born July 15, 1746; and Elizabeth, born Au- 
gust 15, 174S. Thomas George, the grand- 
father of Thomas A., resided all his lifetime 
in his native town, and served as a Lieutenant 
in the Revolutionary War. He married Han- 
nah Brastow, and they had thirteen children. 
His son Artemus, father of the subject of 
this sketch, carried on general farming, living 
on the old homestead during the whole of his 



344 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



life. Artemus married Annie Grant, of 
Rhode Island; and they had six children — 
Artemus A., Thomas A., William H., Sarah 
Ann, Hannah M., and Eleanor S. 

After receiving his education in the dis- 
trict schools of the town and at Day's Academy, 
Thomas A. George taught school in different 
districts for about seven years. He then en- 
gaged in the manufacture of straw goods in 
his native town, and later opened a dry-goods 
store, which he has since carried on, a period 
of about thirty-eight years. His political 
views are those of the Republicans, and he 
cast his first Presidential vote for the Whig 
candidate in 1836. Mr. George has never 
married. 




'REDERICK HARRISON WIGHT, a 
prosperous farmer and marketman of 
Dover, was born in this town, Decem- 
ber 4, 1827, son of Asa and Sibyl (Holbrook) 
Wight. His grandfather, Seth Wight, who 
came here from Medfield, Mass., was engaged 
in farming and sheep-raising for the rest of 
his life. 

Asa Wight, born in Dover, was reared to 
agricultural pursuits. He succeeded to his 
father's farm, which he cultivated during his 
active years. A profitable business in wood 
and charcoal was also carried on by him. He 
died December 13, i86g. Sibyl Holbrook, 
who became his wife, was a native of Sherman, 
Mass. Their children were: James H., born 
July 21, 1816; Harrison, born April 5, 1818, 
who died September 15, 1825; Henry, born 
November 24, 1819, who died September 28, 
1825; Frederick, born July 13, 1821, who 
died September 10, 1825; Sibyl Augusta, 
born June 13, 1823, who died October 2, 
1825; and Frederick H., the subject of this 
sketch. James H. Wight, who married Caro- 
line Whitney, died in May, 1896. His wife 
is now residing in Newton Highlands, Mass. 
Mrs. Sibyl Wight died in May, 1871. 

Frederick Harrison Wight attended the 
common schools. At the age of seventeen he 
began to learn the shoemaker's trade. He 
continued to reside at home, and woi-ked at his 
trade until 185 1, at which time he engaged in 
farming at the homestead, and began to run a 



market wagon through Dover, Needham, 
Brighton, and Boston. In 1871 he moved to 
the village, where he has since carried on 
business as a marketman. He owns a well- 
improved farm, containing twenty-six acres: 
and he still continues to till the soil with ac- 
tivity. 

On June 3, 185 i, Mr. Wight married Susan 
E. Ware. She was born in Wrentham, Mass., 
September 18, 1829, daughter of Herman and 
Ruth (Whiting) Ware, both natives of 
Wrentham, Mass. Herman Ware settled in 
Medfield in 1843, and was engaged in farming 
and butchering there for many years. He 
died in Dover, July 7, 1883, aged eighty-two 
years; and his wife died June 15, 1871. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wight have three children, namely: 
Ellen Augusta, born January 14, 1858; Ade- 
laide Evora, born June 28, 1863; and Fred- 
erick Leslie, born May 5, 1869. Ellen 
Augusta married Lewis W. Chandler, a car- 
penter and contractor of Needham, Mass. 
Adelaide Evora is the wife of George H. 
Thompson, a prosperous farmer of New Brain- 
tree, Mass. Frederick Leslie, who is in the 
antique furniture business in Washington, 
D.C., married Lottie Louise Bacon, of New 
Braintree. Mr. Wight supports the Republi- 
can party, but has never aspired to public 
office. He takes much interest in all meas- 
ures calculated to advance the welfare of the 
community. Both he and Mrs. Wight are 
members of the Congregational church. 




RVILLE C. RHODES, a Selectman 
of Bellingham township and a promi- 
nent farmer there, was born Novem- 
ber I, 1843, son of William O. and 
Waity (Cooke) Rhodes, both natives of Bell- 
ingham. John Rhodes, the paternal grand- 
father, a native of Bristol, R. I., was the 
first of the family to come to Bellingham, 
where he and his sister resided all their lives. 
William O. Rhodes, son of John, is a boot- 
maker by trade. The greater part of Will- 
iam's life, however, has been devoted to agri- 
culture on his farm on Blackstone Street, 
where he still resides, at the age of eighty- 
one. His wife died in 1886, leaving three 
children. These are: Mary J., the wife of 




FREDERICK H. WIGHT. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



347 



George H. Thayer, of Bellingham village; 
Irvin O., who married Etta Talcott, and re- 
sides in Mendon, Mass., where he is a suc- 
cessful butcher; and Orville C, the subject 
of this sketch. 

Mr. Rhodes received a common-school edu- 
cation, and remained at home until twenty- 
four years of age. In 1865 he moved to the 
farm of seven acres on which he now lives. 
He has much enhanced the value of the place 
by erecting new buildings and making other 
improvements. Here he raises poultry exten- 
sively for the market. His is chiefly occu- 
pied as a meat dealer, doing his own butcher- 
ing, and running a retail cart through Belling- 
ham and Mendon, where he has a large trade. 
Mr. Rhodes is much interested in the public 
affairs of the town, and votes the Independent 
ticket. He was Assessor for about ten years, 
and he has been Selectman for the past three 
years. In the Bellingham Grange, No. 190, 
P. H., he is Master. 

His wife, in maidenhood Charlotte M. 
Cook, was born May 10, 1840, in VVrentham, 
this county, daughter of Avery and Charlotte 
(Barney) Cook. Her mother was a native of 
Rhode Island; and her father was born in 
Wrentham, where he resided until his death. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes have two children : 
Clara A., born November 29, 1868, who re- 
sides at home; and Frederick M., born Janu- 
ary 13, 1874, who married Lottie Clarke, and 
resides with his wife and parents at the old 
farm. Mr. Rhodes has earned his success in 
life by close application to work and by mak- 
ing a constant endeavor to please his cus- 
tomers. He is well known and liked through- 
out the town and county. 



AMES WILLARD DANIELS, one of 
the prosperous farmers of Millis, was 
born in this town when it was a part of 
Medway, April 2, 1817. Also natives 
place were his parents, James and 
(Richardson) Daniels; his paternal 
grandparents, Lemuel and Priscilla (Penni- 
man) Daniels; and his maternal grandparents, 
Simeon and Elizabeth (Jones) Richardson. 
Lemuel Daniels, who was a shoemaker by 
trade, settled upon the farm where his grand- 



of the 
Rhoda 



son now resides, and occupied it for the rest 
of his life. He was the father of two children 
— - Jasper and James — both now deceased. 
Jasper wedded Mehitable Partridge, and re- 
sided in Rockville. 

James Daniels settled at the homestead 
after his marriage, and was there engaged in 
farming until October 2, 18 16, when the acci- 
dental discharge of a gun totally destroyed 
the sight of both eyes. He died July 29, 
1882, aged eighty-eight years, and his wife 
on February 24 of the same year. Their chil- 
dren were: James W., the subject of this 
sketch; Rhoda R., born August 31, 1821, 
who died at the age of ten years; and Abigail 
P., born March 16, 1829, who died December 
3, 1831- 

James Willard Daniels acquired a common- 
school education, and was reared to agricult- 
ural pursuits at the homestead. He has al- 
ways resided here, and since 1842 has man- 
aged the farm, which he inherited after his 
father's death. On the property, containing 
ninety acres, twenty acres of which is wood- 
land, he has made various improvements. 
Prior to 1887 he was for many years engaged 
in driving a team between this town and Bos- 
ton. He has been a Republican since the for- 
mation of his party, and he cast his first Pres- 
idential ballot for William Henry Harrison. 
Valuable public services were rendered by 
him in the capacity of Road Surveyor. 

On February 24, 1842, Mr. Daniels married 
for his first wife Marion Adams. Her par- 
ents, Aaron and Catherine Adams, both now 
deceased, were prosperous farming people of 
West Medway. She died March 24, 1849, 
leaving two children: Rhoda A., born Decem- 
ber 4, 1842, who died April 2, i860; and 
Marion Jane, born February 23, 1849, who 
married Sewell H. Bullard, and lives in 
Florida. On October 30, 1850, Mr. Daniels 
wedded Mrs. Mary (Morse) Bullard. She is a 
daughter of Andrew and Margaret (Metcalf) 
Morse, who were natives respectively of Sher- 
born, Mass., and Franklin, and resided upon a 
farm in the district now called Millis. The 
father died here at the age of ninety-four, and 
the mother at that of eighty-seven. By her 
union with her first husband, Sylvanus Bul- 
lard, who died here in 1836, Mrs. Daniels had 



348 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



one son, Frederick Francis, who, born Novem- 
ber 30, 1836, died September 15, 1838. By 
her second marriage she had one daughter, 
Mary Abbott, born October i, 1851, who died 
February 21, 1856. She is a member of the 
Congregational church. 



J-\ DENYS ZIRNGIEBEL, a leading 
— \ florist of Massachusetts, was born 
SV. in Neufchatel, one of the French- 
speaking cantons of Switzerland, in 
the year 1829. He was educated in the Col- 
lege of Neufchatel, under Professor Louis 
Agassiz, graduating in 1848, and then becom- 
ing an apprentice in the Neufchatel Botanical 
Gardens, where he remained for three years. 
The next eight years he spent in Paris, en- 
gaged in the floral business. He then took 
charge of the Gardens of Shadau in Thun, 
Switzerland, for three years; and in 1854 he 
came to America, landing at New Orleans. 
He was in Louisiana for two years; and at the 
end of that time he came to Cambridge, Mass., 
and took charge of the Harvard Botanic 
Gardens. In this position as curator he re- 
mained for twelve years, associated with Pro- 
fessor Asa Gray, the distinguished botanist 
and author. In 1864 Mr. Zirngiebel came to 
Needham, and purchased the property where 
he is now extensively engaged in floriculture, 
raising many plants and flowers for the Boston 
markets. At present he has about thirty-five 
thousand feet under glass and about eight 
acres devoted to the raising of flowers. He 
makes a specialty of producing new varieties 
of plants, flowers, and seeds, particularly of 
pansies, and in this respect has a national rep- 
utation, having originated many new and 
choice varieties. He also does a large busi- 
ness in ornamental and landscape gardening, 
and is greatly interested in the subject of 
heating greenhouses. He has made a study 
of this important question, and is the origina- 
tor and introducer of the system of heating by 
under pressure of hot water. For this he re- 
ceived the first prize offered for the best essay 
on heating, there being fifty-eight competitors 
from different parts of the United States and 
Canada. 

In 1854, shortly before coming to the 



United States, Mr. Zirngiebel was married in 
Switzerland to Henriette Zeller. The three 
children born of this union are: Denys, Jr., 
Hattie, and Augustus. Denys, Jr., born in 
Switzerland in 1855, is now living in Need- 
ham. He was educated in the common 
schools and the high school of this town, and 
learned the electrical business with IModgett 
Brothers, of Boston. Hattie was born in 
Cambridge in 1859, ^"^ ^^^ educated in the 
public schools of Needham, including the high 
school. She married Mr. A. N. VVyeth, of 
Cambridge, and lives in Needham. Augus- 
tus, who was born in 1862, and is now en- 
gaged in business with his father, married 
Mary Richardson. In politics Mr. Zirngiebel 
is a Republican, and he is a faithful supporter 
of Republican principles and American insti- 
tutions. 




ORACH BAXTER SPEAR, a prom- 
inent and highly esteemed citizen of 
Quincy, Mass., where he is now 
living retired from active pursuits, 
was born in this town, October 7, 1822. His 
father, Elijah Spear, was born here, January 
27, 1775- He was a son of Seth and Judith 
(Adams) Spear, and a descendant of old Nor- 
folk County families. Seth Spear was a sol- 
dier in the Revolution, and later was known 
as Lieutenant Spear. He, son of John Spear, 
was born in 1742 in this town, then a part of 
old Braintree, and died here, August 26, i8i8. 
That he was active in local affairs is evinced 
by the mention of his name as a town officer in 
the early records of Quincy. He w^as three 
times married. Judith Adams, of Milton, to 
whom he was united in 1764, died July 10, 
1787, aged forty years. In 1788 he married 
Abigail Marsh, and after her death he married 
Fanny Nightingale. 

Elijah Spear learned the currier's trade in 
his early days, but, instead of following it after 
becoming of age, turned his attention then to 
freighting stone on sloops from Quincy to 
Boston. In this occupation he saved consid- 
erable money, which he invested in land; and 
during his later years he was prosperously 
engaged in the pursuit of agriculture, his 
death occurring in 1833. He served as Se- 



r^ W^' 




HORACE li. Sl'EAR 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



351 



lectman of the town two years, and was a 
member of the School Committee for some 
time. In the first year of the present century 
he married Susanna Baxter (born 1780, died 
1863), daughter of Jonathan Baxter, of 
Quincy. They reared eight children, as fol- 
lows: Seth, born January 9, 1801, died in 
April, 1888; Susanna, born August 31, 1802, 
who married Thomas M. Marsh, and died in 
1891 ; Elizabeth, born January 4, 1805, now 
the widow of Seth Jillson, formerly of Willi- 
mantic, but later of Norwich, Conn., where 
she is now spending her declining years; Abi- 
gail, born April 29, 1807, died unmarried at 
the age of twenty-five years; Judith, born Jan- 
uary 24, 1812, now residing in Quincy; 
Elijah, born in 1813, who died at the age 
of twenty-five years, unmarried ; Lucy, born 
March 31, 1817, who married Charles Marsh, 
and died in 1862; and Horace Baxter, the 
special subject of this sketch. The parents 
were active members of the First Church of 
Quincy (Unitarian), whose house of worship 
is the Stone Temple, sometimes called the 
"Adams Temple, " built at the request of ex- 
President John Adams, mostly of stone from a 
quarry presented by him late in his life to the 
town. 

Horace Baxter Spear completed his educa- 
tion at Derby Academy in Hingham, Mass., 
and was then employed for several years as 
clerk by Josiah Brigham & Co., in a general 
country store in Quincy. Subsequently, form- 
ing a partnership with his brother-in-law, 
Charles Marsh, under the name of Marsh & 
Spear, he was engaged in the wholesale leather 
trade in Boston for ten years. The following 
three years he had no permanent business, but 
in 1868 he was appointed cashier of the 
National Granite Bank and treasurer of the 
Quincy Savings Bank. These positions he 
resigned in 1871, when he became cashier of 
the National Mount Wollaston Bank. In 
1887, after sixteen years of efficient service, he 
resigned his position as cashier of the last 
named bank, and was succeeded by his son, 
Horace Frederick. Since then Mr. Spear has 
not been confined to any active business. He 
is a director of the National Mount Wollaston 
Bank and a trustee of the Quincy Savings 
Bank, where he served for several years on the 



board of investment, and also as vice-president 
and president. For seventeen years he was 
Town Treasurer of Quincy, and he served in 
the same capacity the first year after the adop- 
tion of the city charter. He has served for 
about thirty years as the local agent of the 
Norfolk and Dedham Insurance Companies, 
and this position he still retains. In jiolitics 
he is a straight Republican. He holds a 
commission as Justice of the Peace, having 
received his first appointment from Governor 
Claflin. 

Mr. Spear was married October 25, 1S60, 
to Mary Maria, daughter of lileazer and Mary 
(Gould) F"rederick, of Quincy. The three 
children born of their union are: Horace Fred- 
erick, cashier of the National Mount Wollas- 
ton Bank; Lucy Maria; and Joseph Gould. 
Mr. and Mrs. Spear are members of the First 
Congregational Society (Unitarian), of which 
he has been treasurer and also one of the Parish 
Committee. His more than ordinary capacity 
as a business man and financier, as exemplified 
in his career as a banker and in his public 
service as Town Treasurer, is recognized by 
his fellow-townsmen; and he is rightly re- 
garded as one who has done bis full share in 
promoting the best interests of the town. He 
and his wife and family form a part of the best 
social element of Quincy. 




EV. DWIGHT M. HODGE was born 
in Salisbury, Herkimer County, 
N.Y., about fifty years ago. While 
young, his parents removed to 
Northern New York, settling in Adams 
Centre, Jefferson County. Mr. Hodge was 
educated in the public and private schools, 
Lowville Academy, and St. Lawrence Univer- 
sity. He attributes the better part of his ed- 
ucation, however, to his tutoring by an ex- 
]5rofessor of Oxford, who served as an officer 
in the rebel army, and remained in this coun- 
try some years after the close of the war. 
Leaving college, Mr. Hodge settled in North 
Adams. After a pastorate of two years, he 
continued the study of medicine, which he had 
taken up before entering college. During the 
interval between his years of study at Low- 
ville and his entering college he also taught 



352 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



school, holding the position of principal of 
the village school in Rodman, N. Y. 

After his completion of his course of medi- 
cal study he was settled for ten years in Dan- 
bury, Conn.; and for nine of those years he 
was a member of the Board of Education in 
that city. During this time a committee, ap- 
pointed by the Pennsylvania legislature to re- 
vise the school system of that State, took 
counsel of leading educators, and were referred 
by the Connecticut State Board of Education 
to Mr. Hodge as one of the persons most com- 
petent to advise them in their work. Most of 
his suggestions were embodied in the com- 
mittee's report. During his residence in 
Danbury Mr. Hodge also became a candi- 
date for Congress in William H. Barnum's 
district. Of course, the contest was a hope- 
less one in Mr. Barnum's time. Neverthless, 
Mr. Hodge's vote was one of which he has no 
reason to be ashamed. He had the support of 
independent newspapers, the Springfield Re- 
publican^ though outside the State, advising 
voters desiring better political conditions to 
vote for Mr. Hodge. In 1880 Mr. Hodge was 
invited to become pastor of the Second Uni- 
versalist Church in the city of New York, and 
accepted, remaining in New York ten years, 
accepting a call to his present charge in 
P"ranklin in 1891 . 

Mr. Hodge travelled in Europe in the sum- 
mer of 1886 and again in the summer of 1890, 
visiting nearly all the continental countries 
except Russia. As a writer Mr. Hodge has 
achieved some distinction, and especially as a 
writer of poetry. It is felt that, were he to 
live a less busy and more contemplative life, 
he would make a mark in literature. He has 
contributed poetry and prose to the Univer- 
salist Quarleyl]\ Christian Leader, the Inde- 
pendent^ and various other periodicals. Mr. 
Hodge's tastes, however, incline him to an 
active life; and he holds various positions of 
influence in his denomination, being at the 
present time a trustee of the Universalist 
Publishing House, a trustee of the Massachu- 
setts Universalist Convention, and a member 
of its Advisory Committee. 

Mr. Hodge is an honorary member of the 
Harlem Club, New York City, and was for 
two terms president of the Universalist Club 



of New York City. While visiting Europe in 
1890, Mr. Hodge received the freedom of the 
royal castle of Nuremberg through the cour- 
tesy of the Regent of Bavaria. He was also a 
guest of the Carlton Club, one of the most 
exclusive clubs of London. 




RTHUR W. STETSON, printer, son 
of the late David Brainard Stetson, (jf 
Quincy, is a lineal descendant, in 
the eighth generation, of Robert 
Stetson, who in 1658 was cornet of the first 
troop of horsemen raised in Plymouth Colony. 
Cornet Robert Stetson was born in 161 3 and 
died February i, 1703. From him the line of 
descent is as follows: Joseph, born June, 1639, 
who resided in Scituate, and died in 1724; 
Robert, born December 9, 1670, who married 
Mary Collamore, of Scituate; Amos, who was 
born June 18, 1703, married Margaret Thayer, 
of Braintree, May 9, 1727, and died in Brain- 
tree in 1777; Rufus, born December 8, 1735; 
Jeremiah, born September i, 1776, who mar- 
ried Hannah White, December i, 1803, died 
October 20, 1862; and David Brainard, who 
was born in Weymouth, Mass., P'ebruary i, 
1817. 

Two of Mr. Stetson's near kinsmen were 
soldiers of the Revolutionary War, namely: 
Amos Stetson, his father's great-uncle, who 
died of sickness soon after the surrender of 
Burgoyne; and Gideon Stetson, his grand- 
father's cousin, who enlisted when but four- 
teen years old. 

David Brainard Stetson on attaining his 
majority came to Quincy to work as a clerk in 
Fitz's store. He subsequently applied him- 
self for a few years to the trade of a shoe- 
maker, which he had previously learned, fol- 
lowing that occupation until 1848. Going 
then to North Weymouth, he had charge of 
the store of Henry Newton for about eigh- 
teen months, when he returned to Quincy to 
assume the management of the Union Store, 
Division No. 179, a style of mercantile busi- 
ness quite prominent in many parts of the 
State at that time. He was successful in this 
undertaking, and, investing his earnings in 
shares of the corporation, soon had a control- 
ling interest in its stock, the store, which was 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



353 



one of general merchandise, eventually falling 
into his hands. After carrying it on for a 
brief period, he closed out all departments 
excepting that of shoes, to which he afterward 
devoted his attention, becoming one of the 
foremost boot and shoe dealers of the town. 
At the time of his death, from a shock of 
paralysis received four days before, which 
occurred August 17, 1894, he was the oldest 
merchant as regards actual engagement in 
trade of any in Quincy. This long-estab- 
lished business, which is still in a flourishing 
condition, is continued by his daughter, Miss 
Ella L. Stetson. 

In his earlier years Mr. David H. Stetson 
was connected with the Free Soil party, and 
was a strong anti-slavery worker, being a 
faithful friend and follower of Garrison and 
Phillips. He was one of the original mem- 
bers of the Republican party, was an earnest 
advocate of the temperance cause, and he took 
a deep interest in local and national politics, 
but never aspired to public office. He was a 
member of the Congregational church, and 
each Sunday found him in his accustomed 
pew. His remains are laid to rest in the cem- 
etery at Mount Wollaston, where a beautiful 
sarcophagus has been erected to his memory 
by his loving children. 

On April 25, 1841, he married Abigail 
Spear, daughter of Jedediah Spear, of Quincy. 
She died December 10, 1864, having borne 
him five children — Warren B., Abbie E., 
Lorin A., Ella L., and Arthur W. His sec- 
ond wife, Mrs. H. B. D. Fitz, died Septem- 
ber 27, 1887. Warren B. Stetson, the eldest 
son, born September 26, 1842, is a shoe man- 
ufacturer in Middleboro, Mass. ; Abbie E., 
born in Quincy, February 14, 1844, married 
Henry O. Studley; Lorin A., born April 11, 
1847, died October 11, 185 1 ; Ella L. Stetson 
was born November 4, 1853. Mrs. Studley, 
Ella L., and Arthur W. live at the old home- 
stead in Quincy. 

While still a pupil in the public schools 
Arthur W. Stetson laid the foundation for his 
present prosperous enterprise by printing visit- 
ing and business cards with a small hand-press. 
In his earlier mature years he worked for a 
while in his father's store; but as his printing 
activities increased he decided to turn his 



entire energies in this direction, the result 
being that by his artistic and superior work- 
manship, combined with a close and prompt 
attention to the wants of his customers, he has 
built up a large and lucrative business. 

Mr. Stetson is a Mason of prominence in 
Eastern Massachusetts, being a member of the 
following organizations of that order: Rural 
Lodge, F. & A. M., and St. Stephen's Chap- 
ter, R. A. M., of Quincy, of which he is 
High Priest; South Shore Commandery, K.'I'., 
of East Weymouth; Boston Council of Royal 
and Select Masters ; Boston Lafayette Lodge 
of Perfection; Giles F. Yates Council, 
Princes of Jerusalem; Mount Olivet Chap- 
ter, Rose Croix; Massachusetts Consistory, 
Thirty-second Degree; and Aleppo Temple, 
A. A. O. N. M. S., of Boston. He was also 
one of the board of Grand Officers of the 
Grand Encampment of Odd T'ellows in 1894, 
1895, and i8g6, and is a member of the fol- 
lowing bodies belonging to that order: Mount 
Wollaston Lodge, No. 80, I. O. O. F., of 
which he is P. G. ; Manet Encampment, No. 
75, of Quincy, of which he is P. C. P. ; Grand 
Canton Shawmut, No. i, of Boston, of which 
he is Past Captain ; and of Amana Rebekah 
Lodge, No. 96, of South Braintree. 



-I^TON. FRANCIS W. DARLING, of 

L^-l Hyde Park, Mass., dealer in wood 

|[ g I and coal, was born in Boston on 

— December i6, 1852. His father 

George Darling, and his grandfather, Samuel 

Darling, were both natives of that city. The 

latter was a lumber dealer, and had a wharf at 

Charles Street. He accumulated considerable 

property, and died a wealthy man. 

George Darling was one of a number of 
children born to his parents, and was educated 
in the public schools of Boston, including the 
high school. He early went into the grocery 
business, at first as clerk and later for himself, 
and was in the wholesale trade during the 
greater part of his active life. He was a 
well-known man in Boston, and enjoyed wide- 
spread confidence. His wife, whose name be- 
fore marriage was Eliza A. Duncan, and who 
also was of Boston, bore him four children, 
of whom two lived to reach adult age. George 



3S4 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Darling, Jr., who was in the drug business in 
Boston, died at the age of twenty-five years. 
Mrs. Darling died at the age of fifty-seven. 
Both parents for a time were connected with 
the Bowdoin Square Baptist Church, and later 
were Unitarians. Mr. George Darling was a 
Mason and an Odd Fellow. He had charge of 
his sister's estate for some years, acting as 
guardian. 

Francis W. Darling spent his early life in 
Boston. After his graduation from the Eng- 
lish High School he entered the grocery store 
of Stedman, Thayer & Co., one of the best 
known firms in the city, as clerk, and was with 
them for four years. He then began the study 
of law in the Boston University Law School, 
but before completing the course was obliged 
to give it up on account of failing health. 
He next went into the employ of the Cobb 
Lime Company with their Boston agent, and 
becoming intimately associated with Governor 
Bodwell, of Maine, and the Hon. Francis 
Cobb, of Rockland, Me., men of much promi- 
nence, was with them until 1878, when he 
formed the company of Darling & Stebbins, 
and controlled two wharves in Boston, doing 
a retail business. Later this firm dissolved; 
and in 1890 Mr. Darling established the busi- 
ness now conducted under the name of F. W. 
Darling & Co. in Hyde Park, with a Boston 
office at 17 Exchange Place. 

In 1879 Mr. Darling was united in mar- 
riage with Anna E. Keene, of Rockland, Me., 
daughter of Horatio N. Keene, a boot and shoe 
dealer of that city. Two children have been 
born to them — Harold D. and Laura K. 

In politics Mr. Darling is a Republican, 
and in 1892 he was elected to represent the 
town of Hyde Park in the State legislature. 
He was re-elected in 1893 by three times the 
majority received in 1892, and in 1894 he was 
unanimously nominated from the First Norfolk 
District as the Republican candidate for Sen- 
ator. He carried the election by five times 
the majority ever before given, and was re- 
elected to the Senate in 1895 by a still greater 
majority. In 1896 he sent a letter to the con- 
vention refusing, although strongly urged, to 
be a candidate for a third term. Mr. Darling 
was brought into prominence by his advocacy 
of the anti-stock-watering bills passed in 1893 



and 1894, and by his demand for a statement 
of the American Sugar Refining Trust, which 
had diligently evaded the law for several years. 
He was prominent in the Senate by his work 
in getting through the Metropolitan Sewer 
Construction Bill for the Neponset valley. 
During his last year in the House he was a 
candidate for the speakership, and during his 
second year in the Senate he was a prominent 
candidate for the presidency. He has always 
taken an active interest in the public affairs of 
the town, and has delivered patriotic and other 
addresses upon many occasions, notably one on 
May 30, 1896, at Hyde Park. He is the only 
Senator ever sent from Hyde Park. Mr. Dar- 
ling is a member of the Masonic Lodge of 
Hyde Park, also of the I. O. O. F. ; is vice- 
president of the First Unitarian Society of 
this place; and was a member of the Hyde 
Park Club, of which he was an organizer and 
the first president. 




AMUEL R. MOSELEY, of Hyde 
Park, the publisher of the Norfolk 
County Gazette, was born in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, November 6, 1846, son 
of Thomas W. H. and Mary A. (Beckner) 
Moseley. The paternal grandfather, Daniel 
P. Moseley, who was born near Culpeper 
Court-house, Va., owned the farm where the 
battle of Cedar Mountain was fought. A law- 
yer with an extensive practice in Eastern 
Kentucky, he was a prominent man in the dis- 
trict. He died near Greenup, Ky. , at the age 
of seventy years. 

Thomas W. H. Moseley, born in Mont- 
gomery County, Kentucky; one of the many 
children of Daniel, became a civil engineer, 
and built many bridges, which are monuments 
to his skill. He came to Massachusetts in 
1861 and settled in Roxbury. Two years 
later he removed to Hyde Park. During the 
period of the Mexican War he was Adjutant- 
general in Ohio. His work in Massachusetts 
was principally upon iron bridges and iron 
buildings. He died in Scranton, Pa., in 
1S80, while there upon a business engagement. 
Many inventions of his are in the Patent 
Office at Washington and in use throughout 
the country. He married Mary A. Beckner, 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



355 



who was born in Bath County, Kentucky, 
daughter of Jacob L. Beckner by his wife 
Nancy West (Lancaster) Beckner. She was 
a descendant of Benjamin West, the great 
American landscape painter. Of her four 
children, a son died young. The others are: 
Randolph P., Anna M. L., and Samuel R. 
Both parents were members of the Presbyterian 
church. The father was one of Hyde Park's 
most esteemed residents. 

Samuel R. Moseley came to Hyde Park in 
1863, and became a clerk in the office of the 
iron works there until the company dissolved. 
In 1873 he and Randolph C. Getchell became 
the publishers of the Norfolk County Gazette. 
In 1876 he bought out his partner's inter- 
est, and since that time has conducted the 
paper alone. The Gazette is the oldest paper 
in the county. Started at Dedham in 1813, it 
was brought in 1868 to Hyde Park, where it 
has since been published. Mr. Moseley has 
made it one of the finest papers in the State. 
It is highly prized by its subscribers as a pub- 
lication full of the latest local news and al- 
ways abreast of the times. Its circulation, 
which is large and influential, extends to 
many prominent business men of the county 
as regular subscribers. Besides publishing 
his paper, Mr. Moseley does a large business 
in job printing, for which he has a complete 
plant. 

On June 6, 1870, Mr. Moseley married 
Caroline M. Brown, of Andover, Mass., a 
daughter of John D. Brown, who was a drug- 
gist in Andover for forty years. He is a 
member of Hyde Park Lodge, F. & A. M. ; 
of Norfolk Royal Arch Chapter; of Hyde Park 
Council ; of Neponset Tribe, No. 26, of the 
Hyde Park Red Men ; of Forest Lodge, No. 
148, I. O. O. F. ; of the Riverside Lodge, 
No. 33, A. O. U. W. ; of the' Waverly Club; 
and a charter member of the Hyde Park Social 
Club. In politics he has figured prominently 
as one of the active Republicans of the town. 
P'or the past fifteen years he has been a mem- 
ber of the party's town committee, and for 
the last two years he has been the chairman of 
its county committee. He was one of the 
first auditors of accounts of the town. A 
member of the legislature in 1885-87, he 
served on the committee appointed to investi- 



gate the question of child labor in factories; 
and during both years he was on the Railroad 
Committee. He was also the Postmaster of 
the town during Harrison's administration. 
A public spirited man, he has taken a constant 
interest in the affairs of the town and favored 
every measure likely to benefit it. Both he 
and Mrs. Moseley are connected with the 
I^piscopal church. 




KV. GEORGE HILL, who was a 
prominent Universalist minister of 

Is \ Norwood, was born July 8, 1825, 

in Meredith, N.H. His grand- 
father served as a soldier in the war for inde- 
pendence. His father, Parmenas Hill, was 
for many years employed in the paper-mills of 
Meredith. Parmenas Hill had a family of 
eight children, namely: Charles, a resident 
of Haverhill, Mass. ; Dr. Hiram Hill, of Man- 
chester, N.H.; Mrs. Hugh McLeod, of Cam- 
bridge, Mass. ; Dr. Esther Hawkes, of Lynn, 
Mass.; VV. S. Hill, of Hyde Park, Mass.; 
E. O. Hill, of Ansonia, Conn. ; Sylvanus, 
who is residing in Lynn; and George Hill, 
the subject of this sketch. He died before 
any of his children reached maturit)', thus 
leaving them to shape their own course in life; 
but the struggle for existence and education 
was bravely won, and all became worthy mem- 
bers of society. 

George Hill pursued his elementary studies 
in Meredith, where his boyhood was spent. 
Being ambitious to acquire a liberal education, 
he labored diligently upon farms and in cot- 
ton-mills, with a view of accomplishing that 
laudable purpose. By practising the most 
rigid economy he succeeded in saving a sum 
sufficient to pay his expenses at the Pembroke 
Academy; and he afterward taught school in 
New Hampshire and Massachusetts. His 
theological studies were commenced under the 
guidance of the Rev. Uriah Clark, and 
when twenty-si.x years old he was ordained a 
Universalist preacher. His first pastorate 
was at Arlington, Mass., where he remained 
eleven years, at the expiration of which time 
he was called to Milford, Mass. After resid- 
ing there for five years, he was in 1867 in- 
stalled pastor of the church in South Dedham, 



3S6 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



now Norwood. His pastoral labors in this 
town were thoroughly appreciated by the gen- 
eral community. In 1884 he relinquished the 
arduous duties of a regular pastorate, but con- 
tinued to retain his connection with the min- 
istry, and frequently supplied the pulpits in 
East Walpole, Mansfield, Foxboro, and 
Methuen. Much interested in the welfare of 
Norwood, he was one of the organizers of the 
Business Men's Association and the Board of 
Trade, was the secretary of the latter organi- 
zation, was a member of the Board of Health, 
and a trustee of the public library. He was 
a man of strong individuality and superior 
mental force, whose advice was always sound 
and judicious. His noble, unselfish charac- 
ter and kindly disposition are still fresh in 
the memory of his friends and acquaintances, 
who may be said to include the entire com- 
munity. He was chaplain of Orient Lodge, 
F. & A. M. ; and he was officiating in the 
same capacity at the Norfolk County jail, 
when he died at his home in Norwood, Janu- 
ary 22, 1896. 

Mr. Hill married Georgianna Brown, a 
daughter of David Brown, of Sutton, N.H. 
He left four daughters; namely, Florence, 
Alice G., Jessie K., and Mary Grace. Jessie 
K. is the wife of H. F. Walker, of Norwood; 
Mary Grace married Joseph Foss, of this 
town; Florence is a school teacher, and re- 
sides in Norwood. 



/T^HARLES F. KIMBALL, submaster 
I Kr^ of the Rice Training School of Bos- 

\ ^ ^ ton, Mass., and one of the most 
valued teachers of that city, has 
been a resident of Walnut Hill, Dedham, for 
the past thirty years. A man of scholarly 
attainments, keenly alive to the progressive 
methods of instruction now in vogue in 
schools of all grades, he has made his influ- 
ence felt in educational circles, and has wor- 
thily contributed his full share in maintaining 
the high standard of the special school with 
which he is connected. He was born Decem- 
ber 3, 1830, in Temple, Hillsboro County, 
N.H. His paternal ancestors for at least 
three generations back were natives of the 
Granite State, and each bore the name of 



Isaac. The last years of hi.s great-grandfather 
Kimball, who was a farmer, and who attained 
a venerable age, were passed in the town of 
Temple. Isaac Kimball, second, was like- 
wise a sturdy and industrious tiller of the 
soil, pursuing his occupation throughout his 
active years either in Vermont or New Hamp- 
shire, a part of his life being spent in each 
State. 

Isaac Kimball, third, father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in New Ipswich, 
N. H., April 19, 1789, just eleven days prior 
to the inauguration of George Washington as 
the first President of the United States. He 
early learned the trade of blacksmith, and, 
settling in Mason village, N.H., lived there 
until 1829. During that year he removed to 
the neighboring town of Temple, where he 
engaged in farming in conjunction with his 
trade, making his home there until his death, 
which occurred at the advanced age of ninety- 
two years. He was a skilful and thorough- 
going farmer, familiar with all branches of 
agriculture. He was held in high regard as a 
man of intelligence, integrity, and honor, and 
wielded strong influence in local affairs, serv- 
ing in different town offices, and in 1846, 1847, 
and 1848 as a Representative to the New 
Hampshire legislature. In his early years he 
was a Whig, although in 1844 he cast his vote 
for James G. Birney, the anti-slavery candidate 
for president. On the formation of the Re- 
publican party he joined its ranks, and until 
the day of his death he was a stanch supporter 
of its principles. He retained both his physi- 
cal and mental vigor to within two years of 
the end of his life, when he met with an 
accident which caused him thereafter to be 
bed-ridden. But a short time before the 
accident he had picked the apples from his 
orchard by hand, climbing to the tops of the 
highest trees. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Lucinda Tenney, was born in Hollis, 
N. H., the daughter of William Tenney, a 
prominent farmer. She died at the age of 
seventy years, having borne him twelve chil- 
dren, eight of whom grew to maturity, four 
being yet alive, namely: Charles F. ; Sarah F., 
widow of Luther C. Clement; Henry H. ; and 
Mrs. Hattie M. Haynes. Both parents united 
with the Congregational church while living 




ROBERT \V. CAKrJiNTKR. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



359 



in Mason village, and the father was for 
some years a Deacon in the church. 

Charles F. Kimball was brought up on the 
home farm in Temple, obtaining the rudi- 
ments of his education in the district school, 
and at the age of twenty-two was preparing to 
enter college; but his eyes failing him he was 
forced to relinquish the design. He taught 
school in the years 1849, 1850, 185 1, and 
1852, afterward remaining on the farm four 
years. In 1857 he resumed his professional 
labors, teaching in Townsend, Fitchburg, and 
Attleboro, being principal of grammar schools 
in the two last named towns, and continuing 
as principal in different schools until 1863. 
Going then to West Dedham, Mr. Kimball 
taught there three years, and afterward had 
charge of the Avery School in Dedham two 
years. In 1868 he was elected usher in the 
Rice School, Boston; and in 1878, two years 
after it was made a training-school in connec- 
tion with the Boston Normal School for Girls, 
he was made submaster of the school, a posi- 
tion which he has since held. Mr. Kimball 
has a long and honorable record as an instruc- 
tor, having first taught in New Hampshire in 
1849, and for the past twenty-nine years hav- 
ing been connected with the Rice Training 
School, being now the oldest teacher in the 
building. He served one term as a member 
of the School Board of Attleboro, Mass., and 
for nine years was one of the members of the 
Dedham School Board. In politics he is a 
stanch Republican. 

Mr. Kimball was married August 25, 1859, 
to Juliet A. Stanley, of Attleboro, a daughter 
of Deacon Seneca M. Stanley, a man of high 
character and standing in the town. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kimball are the parents of six children, 
two of whom have passed away: Elsie M., the 
eldest, having died June 7, 1885; and Mabel 
F., the third child, on May 29, 1887. Their 
natural gifts and eminent Christian virtues 
had led their friends to anticipate for them a 
career of great usefulness. The four now 
living are: Evelyn S., a graduate of the Ded- 
ham High School, who is at present at home; 
Anna M., who is attending the Massachusetts 
Normal Art School; Charles H. J., who is in 
the insurance business in Boston ; and Frank , 
W. , who is a graduate of Boston University, 



1894, and now the principal of the high 
school and director of music in all the schools 
of Hardwick, Mass. All of the family are 
greatly interested in music, and Mr. Kimball 
has been chorister in various churches much of 
the time since twenty years of age. Both of 
the sons are now occupying similar positions. 
The family are all members of the l-'irst 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Dedham, e.\ce|it 
Frank W. , who has transferred his church 
relations to Hardwick. They are active in all 
departments of church work, the youngest 
daughter being primary superintendent in the 
Sunday-school, of which the elder of her 
brothers is superintendent. The son Charles 
is likewise active in town affairs, and he has 
for the last two years been president of the 
Dedham No-license League. 




^|OBKRT WINTHROP CARPENTER, 
of Foxboro, Mass., a lawyer with a 
large and important practice, and an 
extensive dealer in real estate and 
mortgages, was born June 4, 1853, in South 
Walpole, Norfolk County, a son of James K. 
Carpenter. In his veins is mingled the blood 
of several of the ancient and honored families 
of New England, including the Carpenters, 
Sweets, and Boydens. The emigrant ancestor 
on the paternal side was William Carpenter, 
who was born in England in 1576, and died in 
Weymouth, Mass., in 1659. His son Will- 
iam, born in 1606, was the next progenitor, 
the line of descent being continued through 
William, third, born in 1631; Obadiah, Sr., 
born March 12, 1678; Obadiah, Jr., born 
February 16, 1707; Nehemiah, born October 
20, 1731; Peter, born September 24, 1771, 
and his son Edson, born December 5, 1802, in 
Foxboro, who was the father of James E. Car- 
penter. 

Nehemiah Carpenter, of the sixth genera- 
tion, was the very first settler of P'oxboro vil- 
lage, coming here from Attleboro in 1749. 
On a ledge near the centre of the town he 
built a rude cabin on the site of the present 
residence of John T. Carpenter; and the land 
of which he took possession has since been 
owned by his descendants, who have preserved 
the building spot in its original state. In 



360 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



1750 he erected a frame house, which for sev- 
eral generations was known as the Carpenter 
Tavern. This building stood until 1880, 
when it was taken down and the frame re- 
moved to Carpenter Street, where it was in- 
corporated into the lumber shed of Joseph 
W. Carpenter. Nehemiah Carpenter married 
Elizabeth Sweet, a member of a noted family, 
whose genealogy may be found in the histori- 
cal novel, "One Thousand and One," recently 
published. 

James E. Carpenter was born and reared in 
Fo.xboro; and there he died, the date of his 
birth being January 30, 1829, and that of his 
death January 30, 1880. He obtained the 
rudiments of his education in the district 
schools, later attending Day's Academy at 
Wrentham and the old Pierce Academy in 
Middleboro. He subsequently read law with 
the late Judge Maine, and after his admission 
to the bar, in 1857, was successfully engaged 
in the practice of his profession in this town 
with offices in Washington, New York, and 
Boston. J-le married Aliss Kowena A. Boy- 
den, the daughter of Jeremiah Boyden, the 
representative of an old Medfield family of 
prominence, which originated in the north of 
England. They reared four children, as fol- 
lows: Robert W., the subject of this sketch; 
Charles E. , a resident of Campello, a suburb 
of Brockton; Eugene M., who died May 13, 
1886, aged twenty-seven years; and Anna 
Isabel, wife of Edwin A. Booth, of Mansfield, 
Mass. 

Robert W. Carpenter was educated in the 
public schools, completing his course of study 
in the high school, and at the age of eighteen 
entered his father's office as a law student. 
He was admitted to the bar of the Supreme 
Judicial Court of Massachusetts on the twenty- 
first anniversary of his birth, June 4, 1874, 
and, going into law partnership with his 
father, the firm being James E. Carpenter & 
Son, with offices in Fo.xboro and Boston, prac- 
tised law with him until December, 1877, 
when the firm was dissolved. Mr. Carpenter 
is a man of superior abilities, natural and ac- 
quired, and has often been called to serve in 
official positions. He has been Justice of the 
Peace and Commissioner of Insolvency for the 
county of Norfolk; presiding officer of the 



local Masonic and Odd Fellows Lodges, 
town council ; clerk of the Board of Select- 
men ; chief engineer of the P'ire Department; 
and clerk of several fund and building associa- 
tions. He was clerk of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the P'o.xboro Centennial Celebration, 
and jniblished a record of the same in 1879. 
He compiled the town history, which was pub- 
lished in 1890; and he was also editor, at dif- 
ferent times, of the Foxboro Journal, Coiii-ier, 
Gazette, and Times. In recent years he has 
been one of the foremost in securing the loca- 
tion of business industries in the town. He 
also takes a leading part in town and county 
politics. At present he holds the offices of 
Justice of the Peace and Notary Public. 

Mr. Carpenter and Miss Etta M. Chandler, 
of P'oxboro, daughter of Isaac G. Chandler, 
a veteran of the late war, and Amelia A. 
(Pills) Chandler, were united in marriage on 
June 10, 1877. They have one son — Frank 
C. , born May 9, 1878, now in the employ of a 
local electric light company of P"oxboro. 

In religious belief Mr. Carpenter is liberal. 
He is actively identified with the Republican 
party, having been secretary of the Norfolk 
County Republican Convention a number of 
years, and in 1896 its chairman. He is a 
member of St. Albaw's Lodge, F. & A. M., 
and Keystone Chapter, R. A. M., both of 
P'oxboro; Bristol Commandery, K. T. , of 
North Attleboro, Mass., in which he has held 
the office of Senior Warden ; and he also 
belongs to Excelsior Lodge, I. O. O. F. , and 
Victory Lodge, K. of H., both of Foxboro. 
He is an active and able business man, and at 
the present time is secretary of the Fo.xboro 
Board of Trade. 



WALTER BRADLEE, of Milton, an 
auctioneer and a dealer in real estate 
and mortgages, was born here, January 
27, 1867. A son of J. Walter and 
Nellie M. (Morse) Bradlee, he comes of Eng- 
lish origin. On the paternal side he is a de- 
scendant in the seventh generation of Captain 
John Bradlee, who commanded a Dorchester 
regiment in the Revolutionary army, and 
fought in the battle of Bunker Hill. From 
Captain John the line of descent comes 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



361 



through Stephen Bradlee, of Dorchester; 
Stephen's son John, the first of the family 
born in Milton; and John's son, John D., 
who also was a native of Milton. John D. 
Bradlee was an auctioneer and nurseryman. 
In 1S58 he founded the business now managed 
by his grandson, the subject of this sketch. 
He was one of the originators of the F'air- 
mount Land and Improvement Company, the 
promoters of the town of Hyde Park, and for 
a number of years was Deputy Sheriff of Nor- 
folk County. 

J. Walter Bradlee, Sr., was a lifelong resi- 
dent of Milton. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of this town and at Milton Acad- 
emy. Subsequently, taken into partnership 
by his father, he was for some time a member 
of the firm of J. D. Bradlee & Co. In 1881 
he became sole proprietor of the business, 
which since that time has been conducted 
under the name of J. Walter Bradlee. A 
prominent resident of Milton and a stanch 
Republican, he held a number of important 
offices. He was Deputy Sheriff of Norfolk 
County for ten years, chairman of the Milton 
School Committee for the same length of time, 
and chairman of the Selectmen for thirteen 
years. He represented Milton and Canton in 
the General Court of Massachusetts two terms. 
In the Civil War he served for nine months as 
Corporal in Company I, Thirty-eighth Massa- 
chusetts Volunteer Infantry, with General 
Banks's division. He died in December, 
1892. His wife, who is also a native of 
Milton, is still residing in this town. Of 
their children six are living; namely, J. 
Walter, Charles, N. Marion, Eva M., Leonard 
M., and Roger W. 

J. Walter Bradlee, the subject of this 
sketch, attended the public schools of Milton, 
and graduated at Bryant & .Stratton's Com- 
mercial College, Boston. For some six 
years he was employed as travelling salesman 
for Hosmer, Codding & Co., wholesale boot 
and shoe jobbers of Boston. His connection 
with this firm ended when he accepted the 
position of Assistant Superintendent of Police 
in Milton. This office he held for a number 
of years. At the death of his father he took 
charge of the real estate business, and the en- 
terprise started in 1858 still continues to pros- 



per. Mr. Bradlee deals in city and suburban 
property, negotiates mortgages, and takes full 
charge of estates when desired. His office is 
Room 201, Adams Building, 23 Court Street, 
Boston. 

Mr. Bradlee was married in 1S88 to Miss 
Clara F. Lyons, of Milton. They have a 
family of three children — John B., Robert 
S., and Ernest A. Like his father, Mr. 
Bradlee is a Republican. He served for three 
years as Assessor of Milton; and in March, 
1897, he was elected Selectman. 



6Tylf 



YLER THAYER, a retired builder of 
ll Norwood and an ex-member of the 
Massachusetts legislature, was born in 
Mendon, Mass., October 2, 1822, son of Otis 
Wales and Sena (Thayer) Thayer. A repre- 
sentative of an old Norfolk County family, he 
is a direct descendant of Fernando Thayer, 
who settled in Mendon in 1698. His great- 
grandparents were Benjamin and .Sarah 
Thayer; and his grandparents were Amos and 
Millie Thayer, all residents of Mendon. Otis 
Wales Thayer was a native of Mendon. 
When a young man he engaged in farming and 
butchering in Medfield, Mass. His wife, 
Sena, whom he married in 1820, was a daugh- 
ter of Dexter and Esther Thayer, of Mendon. 
She became the mother of six children; 
namely, Emily M., Tyler, Emeline, Harri- 
son, Sena E., and P^sther H. 

Tyler Thayer was two years old when his 
parents moved from Mendon to Medfield, and 
he acquired a common-school education in the 
last-named town. At the age of fifteen he 
began to learn the carpenter's trade, serving 
about half of his apprenticeship in Medfield 
and the remainder in Boston, to which city 
he went when eighteen years old. In 1847 
he commenced business as a carpenter and 
builder in West Dedham (now Westwood). 
In 1855 he removed to South Dedham. For 
over thirty years he was the principal builder 
in this town. He erected many of its finest 
edifices, including the Everett school, the 
Baptist church, and the Universal ist church, 
that was afterward destroyed by fire. In 
1886, he sold his business, and retired from 
active pursuits. In 1872, when the town of 



362 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



Norwood was incorporated, its name was 
adopted by the committee at Mr. Thayer's 
suggestion. He was Selectman for thirteen 
years, a member of the Board of Assessors 
for sixteen years, and he represented the 
town in the legislature in 1879 and 1885. 
His public services have been very beneficial 
to the community. During his last term in 
the legislature the charter for the Norwood 
Water Works was obtained. For eight years 
he was a director of the Norwood Co-operative 
Bank and the chairman of its .Security Com- 
mittee, and he acts as a Justice of the Peace. 
Since his first vote was cast for General Fre- 
mont, he has been an active supporter of the 
Republican party. 

Mr. Thayer has been twice married. The' 
first marriage was contracted in 1847 with 
Nancy L. .Shattuck, who died in 185 i, leaving 
no children. His present wife, Lucy E. 
Adams, a daughter of John Adams, of An- 
dover, Vt., has had si.x children, three of 
whom are living. These are: Alice E., the 
wife of James A. Hartshorn; Norman A. 
Thayer, of Norwood; and Nettie, the wife of 
Donald B. Smith, of Provincetown, Mass. 



fOSKPH SMITH, a retired farmer living 
at Unionville, in the town of Franklin, 
Mass., a son of Joseph and Mary Ann 
(Wallace) Smith, was born in Smith- 
field, now Lincoln, R.L, January 5, 1830. 

P2dwin Smith, progenitor of this branch of 
the Smith family, was a member of the Rhode 
Island Colony; and his son Benjamin was 
born in Smithfield. Benjamin Smith, Sr. , 
had four children, namely: Sarah, born April 
9, 1743, who died February 23, 1751; Ben- 
jamin, Jr., born October .14, 1744: Ruth, 
born September 7, 1746; and Amy, born Sep- 
tember 7, 1748. The son was the grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch. 

He was married in 1771 to Mary, a daugh- 
ter of Colonel Daniel Tillinghast. The fol- 
lowing is a brief record of their thirteen chil- 
dren: Sarah, born in 1773, died in 177S; 
George, born September 20, 1775, died 
April 29, 1859; Daniel, born August 10, 
1777, died in Cuba, November 25, 1805; 
Benjamin, born August 2, 1779, died Au- 



gust 8, 1806; Joseph, born June 11, 1781, died 
on his si.xty-si.vth birthday; Annie, born Jan- 
uary 3, 1783, died February 9, 1855; Stephen 
Hopkins, born August 30, 1784, died May 
28, 1858; Hopkins, born August 4, 1786, 
died October 13, 1791; Amy, born August 
17, 1788, died January 28, 1802; Robert, 
born April 6, 1791, died March 22, 1871; 
Lydia, born December 22, 1792, died April 
17, 1806; William, born December 6, 1793, 
died in 1893; and Mary, born September ig, 
1795, died in March, 1888. 

Joseph Smith, Sr., the fourth son of Ben- 
jamin, Jr., was a prosperous farmer and one of 
the prominent men of Smithfield. He served 
in the war of 18 12, and was in his later years 
a Quaker preacher. His wife, Mary Ann, 
daughter of Matthew Wallace, was born in 
Ireland, April 30, 1791, and was a descendant 
of William Wallace. By her first husband, a 
Mr. Lannon, she had four children, of whom 
the only one now living is Margaret, the 
widow of James Pilkington, of California. 
The others were: Mary A., who married a 
Mr. McDonald; Elizabeth, who married Dan- 
iel McDonald: and John, who married Mar- 
garet Veitch. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smith, Sr. , 
had four children : Mary Ann, born June 6, 
1824, who died October 18, 1855; Benjamin, 
born .September 12, 1826; Ruth Hopkins, 
born F"ebruary 2, 1S28, now dead; and 
Joseph, of whom we shall speak further be- 
low. Mrs. Smith died on the ninetieth anni- 
versary of her husband's birthday. 

Joseph Smith, the youngest-born, received 
but a limited education, attending a select 
school for a short time, as did also his 
brothers and sisters. He was brought up as a 
Quaker; and he lived at the parental home 
until his father's death, when he went to Illi- 
nois, where he remained ten years. In 1857 
he went to Indiana, and worked as baggage- 
master on a railroad for two years. Then he 
removed to Northern Missouri, where he car- 
ried on farming, and taught school at the same 
time. When the war broke out, he enlisted in 
Company H of the Second Missouri Cavalry, 
and for one year had charge of a drug store, 
was employed as a clerk in the Provost Mar- 
shal's office, and was detailed to enroll the 
militia. Being then taken sick, for three 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



3(^3 



years he was unfit for work. On his recovery 
from his illness he bought a sorghum-mill, 
and carried it on while working at harness- 
making. After a few years his health broke 
down again; and he was obliged to leave his 
work in Missouri, and turn his attention to 
farming. Going to Kansas in 1X71, he took 
up a homestead at White Rock, which he car- 
ried on for seven years. While there he held 
the positions of Town Assessor and Justice of 
the Peace; but early in 1878, finding his 
health much improved, he sold out, and re- 
turned to his native town of Lincoln, R.I., 
where he was married June 2, 1878. 

After his marriage he bought his present 
homestead at Unionville, known as the "Ind- 
ian Island Farm," formerly owned by Charles 
Rowell. Being a progressive man and an in- 
telligent farmer, Mr. Smith has made many 
improvements on his place, which now con- 
tains one hundred acres of good land. He was 
the first Postmaster and station agent at 
Unionville; and he still holds the former po- 
sition, although he is retired from outdoor 
labor, and rents his farm. Mr. Smith has 
been a successful man in business, and owns 
considerable property in real estate, includ- 
ing several buildings in Gary village. He is 
a stanch Republican in jjolitics, and has been 
a member of the I. O. O. F. He is a man of 
quiet and studious habits, and is somewhat of 
an antiquary, being the owner of many rare 
and valuable relics. 

Mr. Smith's wife was before marriage Eliz- 
abeth H. Meader. Her father, P^phraim 
Meader, a farmer and blacksmith of Sandwich, 
N.H., died there, April 21, 1871 ; and her 
mother, Hannah Gook Meader, died May 21, 
1878. Mrs. Smith is a member of the 
Friends' Meeting of Providence, R.I., and 
Mr. Smith is liberal in religious belief. 




JAMES H. FLINT, the present 
Senator for the First Norfolk Dis- 
trict, is a native of Middleton, 
Essex County, born Jwne 25, 1S52. 
He is a descendant of Thomas Flint, who 
came from England in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, and settled in PIssex County. James 
Flint, his father, who was a native of Middle- 



ton, and an agriculturist by occupation, mar- 
ried Almira Batchelder, of North Reading, 
Mass. 

After attending the common schools for the 
usual period, James H. P'lint in 1872 giadn- 
ated from Phillips Academy at Andover, 
Mass., carrying off the highest honors of his 
class. Then he entered Harvard University, 
from which he graduated with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in the class of 1876. He 
was at once appointed principal of the Marble- 
head High School, where he remained for 
nearly four years. Subsequently he spent six 
months in the office of Charles L. P'lint, then 
the secretary of the State Board of Agricult- 
ure. In 1 88 I he received the degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws from the Boston University Law 
School; and, going to New York City, he 
spent one year in the office of Stanley, Clarke 
& Smith, a prominent law firm of that city. 
Returning to Boston, he was admitted to the 
Suffolk County bar in 1882, and began his law 
practice in Boston, subsequently opening an 
office in Weymouth, Mass. In i88g he was 
appointed by Governor Brackett Special Jus- 
tice of the District Court of Itastern Norfolk 
held at Ouincy, in which capacity he offici- 
ated for several years. In politics he is a Re- 
publican, and he is now serving his third term 
as chairman of the Republican Town Commit- 
tee of Weymouth. In 1887 and 1888 he was 
the secretary of the Republican League of the 
State of Massachusetts. During the legislat- 
ures of 1894, 1895, and 1896 he served as 
Representative from the Fifth Norfolk Dis- 
trict, comprising Weymouth and Ouincy, and 
during these three years was a member of the 
Probate and Insolvency Committee, the Com- 
mittee on Street Railways; and he was House 
chairman. In the fall of 1896 he was elected 
State Senator from the P'irst Norfolk District 
by a majority of forty-five hundred votes. At 
the present time he is chairman of the Insur- 
ance Committee and a member of the Com- 
mittee on Ways and Means, and on Probate 
and Insolvency. 

Mr. Flint is a trustee of the Weymouth 
Savings Bank and a director of the South 
Shore Co-operative Bank. He belongs to the 
Phi Beta Kappa, one of the leading secret so- 
cieties of Harvard University; to the Masonic 



364 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



order; to the Knights of Pythias, in which he 
was the State Grand Chancellor in 1895 and 
1896; and to the New England Order of Pro- 
tection. An able writer, he is the author of 
the book entitled "The Law of Trusts and 
Trustees," and was the editor of the well- 
known American edition of "Lewin on 
Trusts," in two volumes. Mr. Flint has also 
been engaged in literary work unconnected 
with law. In 1889 he married Abbie E. 
Pratt, of Ouincy, Mass. 




vORTER S. BOYDEN, a well-known 
and prosperous carpenter and builder 
of Walpole, was born in this town, 
September 2i, 1838, son of Maynard 
Boyden. His paternal grandfather, Harvey 
Boyden, who was born in the southern part of 
Walpole about the time of the Revolution, 
served as a soldier in the War of 181 2, al- 
though no definite record of his service therein 
has been preserved. 

Maynard Boyden was born in Walpole in 
1 8 10. In his earlier years he was employed 
as a carder and spinner in this and neighbor- 
ing towns. Afterward he worked at the trades 
of carpenter and millwright in Walpole until 
his death, which occurred in 1885, at the age 
of seventy-five years. A man of sound judg- 
ment, honorable and upright in all his trans- 
actions, he became one of the foremost men of 
the place, and took an active part in town 
matters. For six years he was Selectman, 
being elected on- the Republican ticket, which 
he invariably supported. By his wife, Mary, 
who was born in Bedford, N.H., he became 
the father of four children, of whom Porter S. 
and Susan E. are living. 

Porter S. Boyden received his education in 
the district schools of Walpole, in which he 
was a pupil until nearly seventeen years old. 
He then learned the carpenter's trade of his 
father, with whom he worked for five years. 
Afterward he spent an equal length of time 
with the firm of Willard, Everett & Co., 
cabinet-makers of Norwood. In 1867 he re- 
turned to Walpole to begin carpentering on 
his own account; and he has since continued 
here, having for the past thirty years assisted 
in erecting some of the largest and finest resi- 



dences and business buildings of the vicinity. 
A strong Republican in politics, he is much 
interested in local affairs, and has served his 
fellow-townsmen as Assessor for six years. 

Mr. Boyden was married December 30, 
1866, to Julia, daughter of Asa Hartshorn, of 
this town. She died after a comparatively 
brief wedded life, leaving one daughter. 
Bertha 1*2. Boyden. On July 22, 1875, ^I"". 
Boyden married Miss Julia Ella Hale, of 
Lowell, Mass., who has borne him three chil- 
dren — Maynard H., Ella B., and Dana E. 
He is a member of Orient Lodge, F. & 
A. M., of Norwood, in which he was Junior 
Warden for two years ; of Keystone Chapter, 
R. A. M., of Foxboro; and of the A. O. U. W. 
He is also a member of the Unitarian parish, 
of which he was the treasurer for twelve 
years, taking a great interest in the work of 
that denomination. His family also attend 
the Unitarian church, and are active workers 
therein and faithful contributors toward its 
support. 




HARLES G. CHICK, attorney-at- 
lavv, having his office at 28 State 
Street, Boston, and his residence at 
Hyde Park, was born June 7, 1846, 
in Lebanon, York County, Me. His father 
was Simon F. Chick; and his ancestry is 
traced back to Thomas Chick, who probably 
came from England as early as 1652. 

Prior to 1674 Thomas Chick married Eliza- 
beth Spenser, grand-daughter of William 
Chadbourne, one of the founders of the La- 
conia Company's settlement at Newichawanick, 
now Berwick, Me. Thomas Chick, Jr., father 
of Aaron Chick, first, was a son of this mar- 
riage. He held lands at Kittery in 1703, and 
afterward in Berwick. Aaron Chick, first, 
was settled at Berwick as early as 1733 on 
lands formerly of his father Thomas. His 
wife was Elizabeth Clark, daughter of Samuel 
Clark, of Portsmouth, N. H. She became a 
member of the Berwick church in 1755. 
Aaron Chick, second, who was one of the lead- 
ing citizens of his time, was born in Berwick 
in 1742. He served in the war of the Ameri- 
can Revolution as First Lieutenant in the 
Fifth Berwick Company of the Second York 




CHARLES G. CHICK. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



367 



County Regiment. In 1763 he married Mary 
Keays, of Salmon Falls, N. H. Among their 
children was Aaron Chick, third, grandfather 
of Charles G. Chick. 

He was born in Berwick, and there grew to 
man's estate. In 1791 he took up a tract of 
wild land in the adjoining town of Lebanon, 
and, clearing a s]jace in the forest, erected a 
log cabin for himself and little family, and 
began the pioneer labor of redeeming a farm 
from the wilderness. He bore all the priva- 
tions and hardships of his rough life with 
brave fortitude, and in course of years had a 
well - improved and comfortable homestead, 
and was surrounded with pleasant and pros- 
perous neighbors. He with others erected a 
mill, and in addition to general farming was 
for some years engaged in the manufacture of 
lumber, continuing in active pursuits until a 
short time prior to his death, which occurred 
at the age of eighty-four years. He reared 
eight children, Simon F. being the next in 
line of descent. 

Simon F. Chick was born in Lebanon, prob- 
ably in the log house in which his parents 
began housekeeping, and spent his long and 
busy life oh the homestead, dying in 1862, at 
the age of sixty-five years. He succeeded to 
the ownership of the parental acres and to his 
father's occupation, carrying on lumbering 
and farming successfully. His second wife, 
whose maiden name was Ann B. Pray, was 
born in Lebanon in 18 10, a daughter of Chad- 
bourne Fray, a farmer, who died in that town 
when Ann was about six years of age. She 
became the mother of five children, of whom 
three sons are still living, namely; Ansel; 
Almon H., who owns and occupies the old 
homestead in I,ebanon ; and Charles G., the 
special subject of this sketch. The mother, a 
woman of strong Christian character and an 
active member of the Free Will Baptist 
church, died at the age of sixty-seven years. 
The father was for many years a town official, 
serving as Selectman and Tax Collector. 

Charles G. Chick was brought up on the 
home farm, and until eighteen years old 
attended the winter terms of the district 
school. He then worked for a time at the 
carpenter's trade with his brother Freeman 
(now deceased), but at the end of two years 



gave it up, and, entering the J'"armington Nor- 
mal .School, pursued the course of study and 
was graduated in i 868. He was then engaged 
for two years in teaching and reading law, and 
it was during this time that he established and 
opened the East Lebanon Academy, which he 
conducted for a year. Going thence to 
Somersworth, N.H., for two terms he had 
charge of the grammar school there, at the 
same time being a student in the law office of 
Wells & I'lastman, with which office he be- 
came connected in i86g, and also working as 
he found leisure at the carpenter's trade. Mr. 
Chick subsequently pursued his studies at the 
Harvard Law School in Cambridge until May, 
1871, when he entered the office of Judge 
Charles Levi Woodbury, of Boston, with whom 
he read law until admitted to the bar in De- 
cember, 1871, and since that time has been 
associated with the Judge, who is one of the 
most distinguished members of the legal pro- 
fession. Mr. Chick has been connected with 
a great many corporation cases since he began 
practising, and has done a good deal of Probate 
work. He has been the attorney in the set- 
tling of many extensive estates, among others 
worthy of note being the estate of Thomas W. 
Peirce, who left over ten million dollars' worth 
of property, and the million and a quarter 
estate of the late Harvey D. Parker. In 1871 
Mr. Chick removed to Hyde Park, and has 
since been actively identified with the highest 
and best interests of this town. 

He has been one of the warmest supporters 
of the various beneficial enterprises inaugu- 
rated in the town, and has served as one of the 
committee in nearly every movement of note 
for the past twenty-five years, often being 
chairman or secretary. For nine years he was 
chairman of the Board of School Committee 
and its secretary four years, and during the 
period of his seventeen years of consecutive 
service was absent from but four regular meet- 
ings, a record scarcely equalled in any city or 
town of the Commonwealth. He has often 
been called to serve as Moderator of town 
meetings. He assisted in organizing the 
Hyde Park Historical Society, of which he is 
curator, and has for eight years been its presi- 
dent. This is a rapidly growing society, hav- 
ing now a library of fifteen hundred books 



368 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



and a membership of over two hundred. Mr. 
Chick is a member of various fraternal organi- 
zations, including the Hyde Park Lodge, F. & 
A. M. ; Norfolk Chapter, R. A. M. ; Hyde 
Park Council; Cypress Commandery, K. T. ; 
Allon Lodge, L O. O. F ; Knights of Honor, 
in whose lodge he has passed all the chairs; 
and the Society of Good Fellows, of Boston. 

On December i6, 1874, Mr. Chick married 
Miss Eliza A., daughter of Edward and Jiliza 
A. (Mayo) Marshall. Her father was a native 
of Milton, Mass., and lived there until 1840, 
when he removed to Dedham, where his death 
occurred in 1895, at the age of seventy-seven 
years. Mrs. Marshall was born in Dorchester. 
Her daughter, Eliza A., was born in Dedham, 
May 7, 1848, and was there reared and edu- 
cated. After her graduation from the high 
school Miss Marshall taught in Hyde Park 
seven years, resigning the principaJship of one 
of the largest schools of the town to become 
the wife of Mr. Chick. Of the two children 
born to them, but one is now living; namely, 
Francis Marshall. 

Mrs. Chick is a working member of the 
Congregational church, being actively engaged 
in missionary and Sunday-school work. Mr. 
Chick, though not a member of this church, 
takes an active interest in its welfare, and is 
a regular attendant at its services. 

The attractive home of Mr. and Mrs. Chick 
is ever open to receive their many friends, who 
are welcomed with a generous and genial hos- 
pitality. 



/§> 



KORGE FREDERICK BAGLEY, a 
V •) I successful contractor and builder of 
Norwood, and a Civil War veteran, 
was born in Boston, July 29, 1843. His 
father, Perkins H. Bagley, a native of Belfast, 
Me., and a carpenter by trade, spent his last 
years in Boston, where he died at the age of 
seventy-three. Mr. Bagley's maternal grand- 
mother was a lifelong resident of Maine, at- 
taining the age of nearly one hundred years. 

George Frederick Bagley acquired his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Boston. When 
his studies were completed, he learned the 
carpenter's trade. On May 25, 1861, he en- 
listed as a private in Company E, First Regi- 



ment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. 
The regiment arrived at Georgetown, D.C., on 
July 15 following, and participated in the first 
battle of ]5ull Run. Afterward Mr. Bagley 
was at the battle of Williamsburg, through the 
Peninsular Campaign, in the battle of Fair 
Oaks, the Seven Days' P'ight, second Bull 
Run, and Chantilly, and, having arrived at 
Gettysburg on the night of July i, 1863, par- 
ticipated in the memorable struggle that en- 
sued on the following day. P"rom July to 
September his regiment was on duty in New 
York City to quell disturbances caused by the 
draft. In the spring of 1864 the First Mas- 
sachusetts joined the Army of the Potomac 
under General Grant, passed through the 
battle of the Wilderness, and followed Gen- 
eral Lee until after the battle of Spottsyl- 
vania, when, on account of the expiration of 
its term of service, it was ordered to Massa- 
chusetts, and mustered out on Boston Com- 
mon, May 25, 1864. Mr. Bagley followed 
his trade in Boston until May 9, 1872, when 
he came to Norviood. Here, after acting as 
foreman in the employment of a Mr. Robbins 
for a time, he was engaged by Tyler Thayer, 
for whom he worked during the ensuing four- 
teen years. For nearly ten years he has very 
successfully conducted business as a contractor 
and builder upon his own account. In 1889 
he erected a pleasantly located residence for 
his own occupancy, and his shop is situated 
upon an adjoining lot. 

In 1866 Mr. Bagley married Lydia L. De- 
Luce, a daughter of Reuben G. DeLuce, of 
South Boston. Of his six children, George 
F., Jr., Cora, and Lottie Frances are living. 
Cora is the wife of Lee Warren; and Lottie 
Frances is the wife of J. E. May, Jr. Mr. 
Bagley is a Republican in politics. He is a 
member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, and he attends the Lfniversalisl 
church. 






ATTS H. BOWKER, a prominent 

lilder and contractor of Norfolk 
County, residing at 224 Aspinw^all 
Avenue, Brookline, was born December 29, 
1826, in Machias, Me., which was also the 
birthplace of his father, Watts Bowker. 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



369 



The emigrant ancestor came to Massachu- 
setts in Colonial days, locating not far from 
the coast. A James Bowker was living in 
Scituate in 1680. Levi Bowker, the grand- 
father of Watts H., was born and brought up 
in Scituate, and served as Major in the Revo- 
lutionary War. He subsequently removed to 
Machias, Me., where he carried on a success- 
ful business as carpenter and joiner for many 
years, living there until his death, at the age 
of eighty-eight. He married Betsey Watts, 
whose sister Hannah assisted in the first naval 
engagement of the Revolution by carrying 
ammunition to the soldiers when all others re- 
fused the perilous undertaking, and later re- 
ceived a pension from the government for her 
brave services. Hannah Watts married Levi 
Weston, and lived to the age of one hundred 
and two years. The grandparents reared five 
daughters and three sons. Both were firm be- 
lievers in the doctrines of Universalism ; and 
both lived to be quite old, the grandfather 
passing away at the age of eighty-six years. 
He was a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and took an active interest in the lodge to 
which he belonged. 

Watts Bowker spent the greater portion of 
his life in Machias, where for a good many 
years he was extensively engaged as a lumber 
dealer and manufacturer. Afterward remov- 
ing to Nova Scotia, he died there at the age 
of seventy-five. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Lydia L. Stickney, was born and 
reared in St. John, N.B. She survived him, 
living to the venerable age of ninety-four 
years, retaining to a notable degree her mental 
and physical vigor. Of her six children, all 
of whom lived to be more than sixty years of 
age. Watts H., the subject of this sketch, is 
now the only survivor. 

Watts H. Bowker worked at the carpenter's 
trade with his brother from the age of fourteen 
years until he was twenty-one, and then was 
emploj^ed as a journeyman a year or so. 
From 1858 until 1861 he carried on business 
for himself in Machias, giving it up when he 
became a member of Company C, Sixth Maine 
Volunteer Infantry, in which he served as a 
private a short time. He subsequently joined 
the band of the Sixth Maine Regiment, with 
which he was connected two years, being hon- 



orably discharged at the expiration of his term 
of enlistment. Resuming work at his trade, 
he was engaged as a carpenter in Machias 
until 1869, when he came to Massachusetts. 
After spending a few months in Boston, he 
settled in Brookline, then a village of six 
thousand inhabitants, and has since built up 
an extensive and lucrative business in this 
vicinity. He has erected a large number of 
dwelling-houses in Brookline, Newton, Ja- 
maica Plain, and Boston, and many of the 
large public buildings, including school- 
houses, a portion of the public library of this 
town, the Harvard Veterinary College in Bos- 
ton, Keith's palatial residence, and the 
Charles Williams Building in lirookline, also 
the fine plant of the Brookline Gas Company. 

Mr. Bowker is a Republican in politics, 
and takes an active part in the management of 
town and county affairs, rendering efficient 
service to the public. He was elected a mem- 
ber of the Board of Selectmen in 1889, re- 
elected the following three years, and in 1894 
was elected County Commissioner for a term 
of three years. While he was Commissioner, 
the beautiful county court-house in Dedham, 
which is one of the finest buildings of the 
kind in New England, was erected under his 
supervision at a cost of four hundred thou- 
sand dollars. Mr. Bowker is a member of the 
Brookline Lodge, F. & A. M. ; of the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Mechanic Association; 
and I'ost No. 143, G. A. R. 

In 1S56 Mr. Bowker married Miss Julia M. 
Lyon, who was born in Machias, Me., a 
daughter of James Lyon, a well-known lum- 
berman of that place. Her grandfather, 
James Lyon, who was known as Parson Lyon, 
was a soldier of the Revolution. Of the six 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bowker, two 
died in infancy, and the eldest son, Philip, at 
the age of twenty-one years. The three living 
are: Edwin P., Arthur, and Everett. Edwin 
P., who is in business with his father, mar- 
ried Miss Caroline Howe. Their only child 
died when young. Arthur, a druggist in 
Brookline, married Edna Crane, of Machias, 
and they have two children — Elizabeth and 
Julia. Everett, a prosperous physician in this 
town, married Miss Lulu, daughter of William 
J. Griggs, of whom a brief sketch appears 



37° 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



elsewhere in this volume. Their only child, 
William Henry Bowker, was graduated from 
the Harvard Medical College, and has been 
engaged in the jiractice of his profession four 
years. Mrs. Bowker attends the Baptist 
church. 



ULIUS GUILD, a prosperous and well- 
known farmer and dairyman of Wal- 
])()le, was born in this town, March 30, 
1850. A son of Samuel Guild, he is a 
grandson of Aaron Guild and a descendant of 
John Guild, the first member of the family to 
locate in this section of Norfolk County. 
Reared to agricultural pursuits, Samuel Guild 
spent his active life in farming and dairying. 
In his later years he lived in retirement, and 
died on the old homestead in 1892, at the 
venerable age of eighty-six years. He was a 
strong advocate of the principles of the Re- 
publican party, and for some years served as 
Highway Surveyor. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Orra Fisher, was born in Walpole. 
She bore him six children, of whom five are 
living, as follows: Samuel E., residing in 
Walpole; William, of Medfield; Mary J., the 
wife of George H. Ware; Frederick, a resi- 
dent of Walpole; and Julius, the subject of 
this biography. 

Julius Guild grew to manhood on the old 
home farm, acquiring a good common-school 
education, and becoming familiar with agri- 
culture. He received the entire management 
of the farm at the age of twenty-five years. 
On the property, which contains one hundred 
acres of land, he has since carried on general 
farming, making a specialty of dairying. His 
regular crops include oats and hay. That of 
the latter averages about forty tons. While 
keeping fifteen cows, he collects milk in the 
neighborhood, and sells it, together with the 
product of his own dairy, by wholesale in Bos- 
ton. For three years he was engaged in the 
ice business, but gave that up, preferring to 
attend to his dairying. 

In politics Mr. Guild is an adherent of the 
Republican party and an active worker in 
local affairs. His first town office was that of 
Superintendent of the Streets, after which he 
was Selectman for eight years, serving as 



chairman of the board for two years. At the 
present time he is a member of the Walpole 
School Board. He is a member of Reliance 
Lodge and King Mount Lncampment, 
I. O. O. F. ; of the Royal Arcanum, Spring 
Brook Council, No. 732, in which he has 
passed all the chairs, and is now chaplain; ol 
the A. O. U. W., in which he has filled all 
the ofifices; and of the Walpole Grange, 
P. of H., of which he is Master. In each of 
these organizations he is a helpful brother, 
and contributes much to the advancement of 
their interests. He is a member of the Con- 
gregational church, of which he and his fam- 
ily are regular attendants. On September 9, 
1875, he married Mary Ella Pillsbury, of 
Nashua, N.H. They have two sons — Henry 
E. and Waldo J. 



M 



AVID PERKINS was born at Hamp- 
ton, N.H., December 27, 1827, son 
of David and Asenath (Batchelder) 
Perkins. The family is of l^nglish 
descent. The first Abraham was in Hampton 
in 1640 at the first division of land of that 
town. He was noted for his fine penmanship, 
and was employed on public documents. The 
maternal ancestors were direct descendants of 
the Rev. Stephen Bachiler, the first settled 
minister in Hampton, and the Rev. Seaborn 
Cotton, the fourth minister of the town. 

Mr. Perkins, having acquired his education 
in the public schools of Hampton and at 
Hampton Academy, came to Massachusetts at 
the age of eighteen, and learned the carpen- 
ter's trade in Boston. He went into business 
in 1854, and remained a contractor until 1S86, 
when he retired on account of poor health. 
In 1865 he moved to Hyde Park, where he 
still resides. 

He was an active member of the First Con- 
gregational Society for many years, and was a 
member of the Building Committee for the 
parsonage and church. He has been a trustee 
and one of the Board of Investment of the 
Hyde Park Savings Bank since 1873. He 
served on the Board of Selectmen two years, 
the Board of Assessors three years, and on the 
Board of Sinking Fund Commissioners, also 
serving on many other important committees 



BIOGRAPHICAL REVIEW 



371 



of the town. He has been a director of the 
Water Board since its organization, and at 
present he is serving as one of the Sewer Com- 
missioners. 

He has been a member of Mount Lebanon 
Lodge of Masons of Boston since 1862, was a 
member of Siloam Lodge of Odd Fellows for 
many years, and is now a member of Forrest 
Lodge of Odd Fellows of Hyde Park. When 
engaged in business, he was a member of the 
Mechanics' Exchange and Master Builders' 
Association of Boston. 

He married in 1858 Hannah S. Dunn, of 
Dixfield, Me., and has had four children, three 
of whom are now living: Dr. John Walter 
Perkins, of Kansas City, Mo. ; Sarah J. John- 
son, of Hyde Park; and William D. Perkins, 
of Seattle, Wash. 



/^Xo 



EORGE H. WIGHT, a well-known 
I '*) I farmer and an esteemed resident of 
^ — ^ Medfield, was born here, June 18, 
1832, son of Orin and Charlotte (Adams) 
Wight. The father, who was also born in 
Medfield, always made his home in this town, 
carrying on the farm that his father settled in 
1760. He was a man of influence, and he 
served his town as Selectman and in other 
offices. He died in 1869. The mother died 
in 1879. They had thirteen children, of 
whom eight are living in Massachusetts. 
These are: Mary J., the widow of William 
H. Colburn, in Newton; Eliza, the widow of 
Emery A. Wheeler, in Worcester; George 
H., the subject of this sketch; Margaret, the 
widow of William B. Hewins, in Medfield; 
Sarah, also in Medfield; Jonathan G., now in 
Medfield; Harriet H., in Wayland; and Fred- 
erick, in Natick. Some of the children were 
educated in the schools of Bridgewater, Mass. 
George H. Wight attended the common 
schools of Medfield. He lived at home for 
several years after coming of age, and worked 
with his father. In August, 1862, he enlisted 
for one year in Company D, Forty-second 
Regiment, Roxbury City Guards. He was 
captured in the engagement at Galveston, 
Tex., and kept in prison for two months. 
After his discharge, at the expiration of his 
term of enlistment in August, 1863, he re- 



turned to Medfield. In the following year he 
took charge of the homestead farm, which is 
still his home. Besides this place, which 
contains about eighty acres, he owns other 
land. He carries on general farming with 
success. For several years he was employed 
as a land surveyor. 

On January 11, 1866, Mr. Wight was 
joined in marriage with Miss Mary R. Adams, 
of Millis, Mass. She was born October 24, 
1838, daughter of Edward and Keziah L. 
(Clark) Adams. Mr. Adams, who was born 
in Millis, and died September 23, 1870, fol- 
lowed farming as an occupation. Mrs. Adams, 
who was born in Milford, Mass., died January 
15, 1 89 1. Mr. and Mrs. Wight have one 
child, Anna M., living at home. They are 
attendants of the Unitarian church. Mr. 
Wight has always voted the Republican ticket. 
He belongs to Moses Ellis Post, No. 117, 
G. A. R. 




RANCIS EUGENE EVERETT, an 
enterprising provision dealer in Nor- 
wood, was born in Walpole, Mass., 
January 24, 1855, son of Charles Francis and 
Hannah Maria (Pierce) Everett. He traces 
his descent through a long line of ancestors to 
the first of them, who arrived in Massachu- 
s